The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

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Hackaday reports that OnChip launched a Crowd Supply campaign:

mRISC-V: The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

Now, this is finally changing. OnChip, a startup from a group of doctoral students at the Universidad Industrial de Santander in Colombia, have been working on mRISC-V, an open 32-bit microcontroller based on the RISC-V instruction set [..]

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Open-V Chip Specifications

  • Package
    • QFN-32
    • No other packages are planned for the first run
  • Processor
    • RISC-V ISA version 2.1
    • 1.2 V operation
  • Memory
    • 8 KB SRAM
  • Clock
    • 32 KHz – 160 MHz
    • Two PLLs, user-tunable with muxers and frequency dividers
    • includes all clocking and bias circuitry
  • Analog Signals
    • Two 10-bit ADC channels, each running at up to 10 MS/s
    • Two 12-bit DAC channels
  • Timers
    • One general-purpose 16-bit timer
    • One 16-bit watch dog timer (WDT)
  • General Purpose Input/Ouput
    • 16 programmable GPIO pins
    • two external interrupts
  • Interfaces
    • SDIO port (e.g., microSD)
    • Two SPI ports
    • I2C
    • UART
  • Programming and Testing
    • Built-in debug module for use with gdb and JTAG
    • Programmable PRBS-31/15/7 generator and checker for interconnect testing
    • Compatible with the Arduino IDE

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Open-V Dev Board Specifications

The dev board comes completely assembled.

  • USB 2.0 controller
  • 1.2 V and 3.3 V voltage regulators
  • Clock reference
  • Breadboard-compatible breakout header pins
  • microSD receptacle
  • Micro USB connector (power and data)
  • JTAG connector
  • 32 KB EEPROM
  • 32-pin QFN Open-V microcontroller
  • Dimensions: 55 mm x 30 mm (excluding USB receptacle)
The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

Hackaday: The Future Travels Of The Travelling Hackerbox

For the past year, I’ve been organizing a very special project over on hackaday.io. It’s the Travelling Hacker Box, a box full of random electronics junk, sibling to the The Great Internet Migratory Box Of Electronics Junk, and a project that has already traveled more than 25,000 miles. Earlier this month, I said the Hackerbox…

via The Future Travels Of The Travelling Hackerbox — Hackaday

Hackaday: The Future Travels Of The Travelling Hackerbox

1bitsy: Open Source JTAG enabled ARM dev platform

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Piotr Esden-Tempski of 1Bitsquared created this Open Source and Open Hardware debuggable ARM development platform:

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Firmware development with the lights on

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Design files and source code are shared on GitHub:

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Small breadboard friendly STM32 (eventually other mcu’s too) eval boards with exposed JTAG and SWD for the use with Black Magic Probe and others!

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Example projects for the 1BitSy development boards

 

1bitsy: Open Source JTAG enabled ARM dev platform

The MightyWatt: a 70W Electronic Load Kit

of Kaktus Circuits created this programmable electronic load that sits on top of an Arduino:

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The MightyWatt: a 70W Electronic Load Kit

Electronic loads are used to draw power from a source at either a constant current or a constant voltage. This comes in useful for things like battery discharge testing or making sure that PCB you designed can actually power those motors without releasing the all important magic smoke.

The kit is sold on Tindie:

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MightyWatt turns your Arduino Uno R3, Arduino Zero (M0/M0 Pro) or Arduino Due into an electronic load capable of dissipating 70 Watts in a very small form factor. Ideal for testing power supplies, batteries, fuel cells or power amplifiers.

Design files and source are shared on GitHub:

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The MightyWatt: a 70W Electronic Load Kit

Creating A PCB In Everything: KiCad, Part 1

This is the continuation of a series of articles demonstrating how to Create A PCB In Everything. In this series, we take a standard reference circuit and PCB layout — a simple ATtiny85 board — and build it with different PCB design tools. Already, we’ve taken a look at the pre-history of PCB design with…

via Creating A PCB In Everything: KiCad, Part 1 — Hackaday

Creating A PCB In Everything: KiCad, Part 1

HydraESP32: HydraBus and ESP-32S

The Espressif ESP32 features a 32-bit 240 MHz dual core processor with  Wi-Fi and BLE. HydraBus created this shield for ESP-WROOM-32 or ESP-32S.

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HydraESP32 v1.1 Rev1 with ESP-32S is alive

This shield can be used with or without HydraBus board, you can even cut HydraBus specific right side (on the line) to have a tiny ESP-WROOM-32 breakout board.

hydrabus has shared the board on OSH Park:

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Order from OSH Park

HydraESP32: HydraBus and ESP-32S