EEPROM Programmer Arduino Shield

From the The Oddbloke Geek Blog, an EEPROM programmer shield designed for Arduino Mega:

EEPROM_Programmer_And_Arduino_Mega.jpg

Simple EEPROM Programmer … revisited

Some time ago, I wrote about my DIY EEPROM programmer driven by an Arduino Mega. It’s a very simple, low-tech project … but has attracted a consistently-high number of visitors to the site and is something I use several times a week.

EEPROM Programmer Arduino Shield

E-Ink controller with ice40 FPGA

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writes on Hackaday:

E-ink Display Driven DIY

E-ink displays are awesome. Humans spent centuries reading non-backlit devices, and frankly it’s a lot easier on the eyes. But have you looked into driving one of these critters yourself? It’s a nightmare. So chapeau! to [Julien] for his FPGA-based implementation that not only uses our favorite open-source FPGA toolchain, and serves as an open reference implementation for anyone else who’s interested.

Watch the E-Ink controller in action:

Design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smalljulbouln/ice40_eink_controller

julbouln has shared the board on OSH Park:

eink controller

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Order from OSH Park

E-Ink controller with ice40 FPGA

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Bob Baddeley writes on Hackaday:

Giant Solderless LEGO NES Controller Gives Everyone Tiny Hands

[BrownDogGadgets] built a giant NES controller out of LEGO. The controller is designed in LEGO Digital Designer, which lets you create a virtual model, then get a full list of parts which can be ordered online.

The electronics are based on a Teensy LC programmed to appear as a USB keyboard, and the buttons are standard push buttons. The insides are wired together with nylon conductive tape. LEGO was an appropriate choice because the Teensy and switches are built on top of LEGO compatible PCBs, so components are just snapped in place. The system is called Crazy Circuits and is a pretty neat way to turn electronics into a universal and reusable system.

Here is the controller in action:

Design files and source code for Crazy Circuits modules and projects are available on GitHub:

github-smallBrownDogGadgets/CrazyCircuits

Find out more in our previous blog post:

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Manual assembly of KiCad PocketBone

We’re excited to see that Michael Welling of QWERTY Embedded Design has completed manual assembly of his KiCad-designed PocketBone with the Octavo Systems OSD3358 SiP (System-in-Package):

BGA achievement unlocked

Michael used vacuum pickup tool to manually place the components:

Here is a video of him placing the components:

Michael then used Reflowster to reflow the solder paste:

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Here is a video of the reflow process:

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Check out the Hackaday.io project for more info:

Pocketbone KiCAD
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The KiCad design files are available in the GitHub repo:

github-smallmwelling/pocketbone-kicad

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mwelling has shared the board on OSH Park:

PocketBone KiCAD (OSHPark Edition)

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Order from OSH Park

Manual assembly of KiCad PocketBone

Hackaday: Call for Hack Chat Hosts

Every week Hackaday.io features an AMA of sorts. This is the Hack Chat, a chatroom where we sit down with the best in the business to talk about manufacturing techniques, engineering, and how to build the best hardware around. Over the last few months, we’ve hosted a few hardware celebrities, from [Sprite_TM] talking about the ESP32,…

via Call for Hack Chat Hosts — Hackaday

Hackaday: Call for Hack Chat Hosts

SIS-2 Universal Remote Receiver

Jeremy Cook writes on the Tindie blog about this IR receiver board by Atomsofttech:

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SIS-2 Universal Remote Receiver

When you think of a “universal remote,” you generally picture an infrared (IR) emitter that can be setup to control your TV, AV receiver, and any other number of devices that work using IR signals. On the other hand, what’s to keep someone from doing the opposite, and having a universal receiver that can be programmed to accept codes from a remote that you just have lying around?

Watch the receiver board in action:

SIS-2 Universal Remote Receiver