Hackaday: What Actually Happens At A Hardware Hacking Con

 

The Hackaday Superconference was last weekend, and it was the greatest hardware con on the planet. What can you build out of a conference badge? If you answered “a resin-based 3D printer” you would have won a prize. If you decided to put your badge in a conference water bottle and make a stun gun…

via What Actually Happens At A Hardware Hacking Con — Hackaday

Hackaday: What Actually Happens At A Hardware Hacking Con

Vectrex cartridge board

From Frank Buss on hackaday.io:

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Vectrex cartridge

This is my first version of a PCB for building a Vectrex cartridge. I used this for my Kickstarter project for the Bloxorz game. The PCB was manufactured by @oshpark , you can order your board here.

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It fits in this 3D printed case from Thingiverse (you can order it here in my Shapeways shop), or in one of the nice new injection molded cartridge shells from Sean Kelly

Frank has launched a Kickstarter campaign:

FrankBuss has shared the board on OSH Park:

vectrex.brd

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Order from OSH Park

Vectrex cartridge board

SoftRF LoRa

SoftRF is an open project for aircraft collision avoidance avionics and has designed an adapter for RFM9x to fit NRF905 module dimensions and pinout:

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SoftRF

Multifunctional DIY IoT-based general aviation proximity awareness system.

Features:

  • 2-way raw data bridge between 868/915 MHz radio band and Wi-Fi ;
  • standalone, battery powered, compatible proximity awareness instrument that fits typical 2.25 inches hole ;
  • lightweight version to carry onboard of an UAV.

SoftRF has shared the board on OSH Park:

SoftRF-LoRa v1.1
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Order from OSH Park

SoftRF LoRa

LTE NB-IoT Shield for Arduino

From Timothy Woo on Hackaday.io:

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LTE NB-IoT Shield for Arduino

This open-source LTE shield uses SIMCOM’s SIM7000-series modules with the latest LTE CAT-M technology to allow Arduino users to painlessly connect their low-power IoT devices with the next-generation cellular technology!

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NB-IoT is also available for many countries (but sadly not in the USA yet) simply by swapping out to a different SIM7000 module version. Luckily SIMCOM made it super easy to integrate this module because most of the AT commands are identical to previous version, and Adafruit has a wonderful library for their FONA 2G and 3G products. Check it out and help make this happen!

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You can view the latest code and design files here on my Github page: https://github.com/botletics/NB-IoT-Shield. Note: The hardware works great but software is still under development! I plan on launching an Indiegogo campaign when I get a fully-working prototype, so stay tuned for updates!

LTE NB-IoT Shield for Arduino

NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

From on the Hackaday blog:

Real-Life Electronic Neurons

NeruroBytes is not a strange platform for neural nets. It’s physical neurons, rendered in PCBs and Molex connectors. Now, finally, it’s a Kickstarter project, and one of the more exciting educational electronic projects we’ve ever seen.

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Regular Hackaday readers should be very familiar with NeuroBytes. It began as a project for the Hackaday Prize all the way back in 2015. There, it was recognized as a finalist for the Best Product,

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Since then, the team behind NeuroBytes have received an NHS grant, they’re certified Open Source Hardware through OSHWA, and there are now enough NeuroBytes to recreate the connectome of a flatworm. It’s doubtful the team actually has enough patience to recreate the brain of even the simplest organism, but is already an impressive feat.

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The highlights of the NeuroBytes Kickstarter include seven different types of neurons for different sensory systems, kits to test the patellar reflex, and what is probably most interesting to the Hackaday crowd, a Braitenberg Vehicle chassis, meant to test the ideas set forth in Valentino Braitenberg’s book, Vehicles: Experiments in Synthetic Psychology. If that book doesn’t sound familiar, BEAM robots probably do; that’s where the idea for BEAM robots came from.

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NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

The Hacker Village of Supercon

I’m utterly exhausted and still in a state of awe. The Hackaday Superconference has grown in so many ways, but one thing remains the same: the spirit of the Hacker Village — an intangible feeling that grows up around all who attend — is bliss to take part in. There’s really no substitute for having…

via The Hacker Village of Supercon — Hackaday

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The Hacker Village of Supercon

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

RAMPS compatible driver module based on DRV8818 by Dean Gouramanis:

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DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

The goal of this project is to fit the DRV8818 driver circuit onto the standard 0.8″ X 0.6″ PCB size used in RAMPS 3D printers. DRV8825 drivers are a popular choice for desktop 3D printers, because they can provide up to 2.5 amps peak current. The DRV8818 is a similar IC capable of driving up to 3.5 amps, but the circuit is too large to fit on PCB using regular methods. Also, without a propper heatsink it will overheat.

Schematic, gerbers and mechanical CAD files are shared on GitHub:

dgouramanis/T18_driver

 
DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers