Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks and Workshops

From Andrew Back:

OSHCamp2014_Workshop-768x0-c-default

Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks & Workshops

This year’s Open Source Hardware Camp will be hosted at The Blue Room in the historic county town of Lincoln, over the weekend of Sat 30th June & Sun 1st July. Lincoln is home to, amongst others, noted engine builders Ruston & Hornsby — now Siemens, via GEC and English Electric — and is well served by rail, reachable from Leeds and London within 2-2.5 hours, and 4-5 hours from Edinburgh and Southampton.

The call for talks and workshops has now gone out, there is no theme and topics may include, for example:

  • Open source hardware projects
  • Open development practices and principles
  • Novel/interesting/fun projects built using open source hardware
  • Tools (hardware and software)
  • Skills and techniques, e.g. PCB fab, DIY SMT assembly
  • Relevant technologies, e.g. SPI/I2C bus programming
  • …something else relevant to the community

If you would like to give a talk on the Saturday and/or run a workshop on the Sunday, please submit details via the online form.

Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks and Workshops

Hackaday LA meetup tonight

Tonight at Supplyframe DesignLab in Pasadena:

Join us for the first Hackaday LA meetup of 2018 TONIGHT at Supplyframe DesignLab at 6:30pm PST! Watch excellent talks from Carlyn Maw & Nikita Pashenkov and meet with your fellow LA hackers.

Hackaday LA January Meetup

Tuesday, Jan 30, 2018, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe DesignLab
30 East Del Mar Boulevard Pasadena, CA

126 Hackers Attending

Join us for the first Hackaday LA meetup of 2018! We’ll have to two great talks from Carlyn Maw and Nikita Pashenkov, enjoy food & drink, and celebrate with fellow hackers to kick off 2018 right. Featured Speakers Carlyn Maw – “A Social Life for IoT” In mid-19th century England a new middle class streamed into cities. Surrounded by strangers unvett…

Check out this Meetup →

Look for Drew Fustini in purple!

Hackaday LA meetup tonight

LTE Arduino GPS Tracker and IoT Dashboard

Timothy Woo shows how to make a powerful Arduino GPS tracker that posts data to the cloud via LTE and view data graphically on IoT dashboards:
7510911513094940025

LTE Arduino GPS Tracker + IoT Dashboard

Hey guys! In this tutorial we’ll be creating a GPS tracker using the Botletics SIM7000 LTE shield and an Arduino and view the data on two free IoT dashboards. I’ll start off by explaining how to get everything set up and posting data to the cloud, then I’ll move into how to set up the IoT dashboards to view data. The two dashboards we will be looking at are Freeboard.io and ThingsBoard.io.

Since this tutorial is a follow-up of my first Instructable on using the Botletics LTE/NB-IoT shield for Arduino so if you haven’t already, please read it to get a good overview of how to use the shield and what it’s all about. In this tutorial I’ll focus on IoT data logging, and specifically, GPS and temperature tracking and provide you will all the code and guidance you’ll need to hit the road and test it out! It’ll be a decently lengthy tutorial so sit tight and grab some coffee!

Although I’ll be mainly focusing on the LTE shield that I personally designed and built, everything here (including the Github Arduino library) should work on SIMCom’s 2G and 3G modules like the SIM800/808/900/5320 as well since it’s just an updated version of the Adafruit FONA library. Regardless of hardware the concept is exactly the same and you can do lots of cool stuff with this, including sensor data logging, remote weather monitoring, auto theft karma GPS tracking, etc… so read on!

LTE Arduino GPS Tracker and IoT Dashboard

Shah Selbe: Science in the World’s Wildest Places

When we think of building research hardware, lab coats and pristine workbenches come to mind. Shah Selbe used to do something kind of like that when he was engineering satellite propulsion systems. But after putting twelve of them into space, he ditched the office gig and took his gear to some of the wildest places on…

via Shah Selbe: Science in the World’s Wildest Places — Hackaday

Shah Selbe: Science in the World’s Wildest Places

PocketBeagle USB breakout board

PocketBeagle USB breakout board by Sai Yamanoor:

The hardware design files are shared on GitHub:

sai-y/pocket_beagle_adapter

PocketBeagle USB breakout board

Shmoocon: Delightful Doppler Direction Finding With Software Defined Radio

When it comes to finding what direction a radio signal is coming from, the best and cheapest way to accomplish the task is usually a Yagi and getting dizzy. There are other methods, and at Shmoocon this last weekend, [Michael Ossmann] and [Schuyler St. Leger] demonstrated pseudo-doppler direction finding using cheap, off-the-shelf software defined radio…

via Shmoocon: Delightful Doppler Direction Finding With Software Defined Radio — Hackaday

Shmoocon: Delightful Doppler Direction Finding With Software Defined Radio