Essential Equipment For Your Soldering Workbench

From  on the Tindie blog:

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Essential Equipment For Your Soldering Workbench

Soldering is the perfect hobby for anyone who wants to make their own electrical equipment – you’ll learn how it operates, teach yourself to diagnose faults and even save money on buying completed products!

This is the core skill in assembling your own electronics. It requires a slowly-paced, methodical approach which becomes equally relaxing as it is engrossing. You’ll love the feeling of plugging in a device you’ve just put together from intriguing and seemingly magical components – one of the great little pleasures of soldering, especially when it works first time!

Even the most long-standing electrician was once in a position of not knowing what was required or involved in soldering, so don’t fret if it’s new to you. We’re going to look at what’s needed to get started in soldering and what each item does, so you’ll know exactly what to put on your soldering workbench and get started in making exciting electrical gadgets!

Essential Equipment For Your Soldering Workbench

Open Source Hardware User Group (OSHUG) in London on January 17th

The Open Source Hardware User Group (OSHUG) is meeting tomorrow, Thursday, January 17th, in London, UK:

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OSHUG Event #71 — Machines and systems of past, present, future

To start off the year, we have a series of talks around the theme of
Acorn computers, RISC OS, RISC-V toolchain.

  • Brief history of Unix-like operating systems on Acorn hardware
  • RISC OS : What’s Next
  • Embedded FreeBSD on a five-core RISC-V processor using LLVM
  • Using Buildroot to create embedded Linux systems for 64-bit RISC-V
Open Source Hardware User Group (OSHUG) in London on January 17th

Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on January 15th

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The next Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago is tomorrow, Tuesday, January 15th:

January 3H Chicago Meetup

Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019, 6:30 PM

Ballast Point Brewing Chicago
212 N Green St Chicago, il

17 Members Attending

Bring all of your holiday gadgets and gizmos! Did you build a blinky Christmas tree ornament? Did you get a new scope from Santa? Did you take apart some toys? Bring it all to the meetup! We’re trying out a new location for the new year! Come have a pint, show off your latest project and get to know your fellow Chicago tinkerers. (Updated invite on…

Check out this Meetup →

Bring all of your holiday gadgets and gizmos! Did you build a blinky Christmas tree ornament? Did you get a new scope from Santa? Did you take apart some toys? Bring it all to the meetup!

We’re trying out a new location for the new year! Come have a pint, show off your latest project and get to know your fellow Chicago tinkerers.

Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on January 15th

Giant Board packs Linux into the size of an Adafruit Feather

@groguard designed the Giant Board which runs Linux in the form factor of the Adafruit Feather:

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The Giant Board is a super tiny single-board computer based on the Adafruit Feather form factor. We always want more power in a smaller package and the Giant Board delivers!

There are always those couple of projects that just need a little more power, or a different software stack. With the release of the ATSAMA5D27C-D1G, its made linux possible in such a small form factor. Listed below are the specs and current pinout of the board.

Follow @groguard on Twitter to learn more about the project:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giant Board packs Linux into the size of an Adafruit Feather

35C3: Biggest Communication Congress, Yet Little Chaos

Every year for the past 35 years, the German Chaos Computer Club has met just after Christmas for a few days of “Spaß am Gerät” — having fun with the machines. And that’s everything from trying to bring an old PDP-8 back into running condition to forging new software to replace the old and busted social media platforms that permeate our lives. The sum total of around 17,000 people doing the nerdy stuff that they love, and sharing it together, is both amazing and inspiring. Four days of little sleep and much socializing later, I bet there was still another four days’ worth of stuff to see.
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[Dave Darko] had a slew of his custom badges on hand, including one that he made for the conference. In true Chaos spirit, it didn’t have any firmware written yet — it was just a blank, multi-radio slate. So he handed a bunch out to [SpaceHuhn] and the rest of the Insecure crew for them to hack on. Let’s see what they come up with. [Alex] was working on layout and parts sourcing for even tinier LED matrixes!
via 35C3: Biggest Communication Congress, Yet Little Chaos — Hackaday
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Modular Feeders For SMD Component Tape

Making one of something is pretty easy, and making ten ain’t too bad. But what if you find yourself trying to make a couple of hundred of something on your home workbench? Suddenly, small timesavers start to pay dividends. For just such a situation, you may find these modular SMD tape feeders remarkably useful.

The tape feeders come in a variety of widths, to suit different size tapes. You’ve probably seen if you’ve ever ordered SMD components in quantity from Mouser, Digikey, et al. SMD components typically ship on large tape reels, which are machine fed into automated pick and place machines. However, if you’re doing it yourself in smaller quantities, having these manual tape feeders on your desk can be a huge help. Rather than having scraps of tapes scattered across the working surface, you can instead have them neatly managed at the edge of your bench, providing components as required

via Modular Feeders For SMD Component Tape — Hackaday

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Jar of Fireflies on Tindie

From  on the Tindie blog:

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Jar O’ Fireflies Kit or Assembly

Relaxing outside on a hot summer evening you might catch a glimpse of fireflies as they perform an ethereal bioluminescent dance. Maybe you even been able to catch a few, trapping them in a jar for your entertainment. Recreate a bit of that magic with a DIY electronics project.

This FireFly Jar Kit presents a different, and much longer-lasting, bottle of blinkies. Instead of actual fireflies blinking, is emulates the bugs’ effect with tiny 0603 LEDs and 38 AWG wire. An ATtiny85V provides lighting control, and it should be able to function on its CR123A battery for 6 months or more.

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While you can build this type of contraption yourself, the item listed here is available fully-assembled, as a kit, or a PCB only. In either case, you don’t have to mess about with making your own PCB or perf board assembly, which could be well worth the $30, $20, or $10 price tag. Personally, I much prefer to avoid soldering as much as possible, especially if the terms “0603” and “38 AWG” are involved. Soldering concerns aside, be sure to check out the representative video of this type of faux firefly effect below:

 

Jar of Fireflies on Tindie