How to Make a USB Laptop Keyboard Controller

This video by Frank Adams shows how to make a USB laptop keyboard controller:

This video and “Instructable” describe how to make a USB controller for a laptop keyboard. I designed a circuit card for a Teensy LC or 3.2 that connects to a keyboard FPC cable with up to 34 pins on a 1mm or 0.8mm pitch.

 writes on Hackaday about the project:

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[Frank Adams] liked the keyboard on his Lenovo ThinkPad T61 so much that he decided to design an adapter so he could use it over USB with the Teensy microcontroller. He got the Trackpoint working, and along the way managed to add support for a number of other laptop boards as well. Before you know it, he had a full-blown open source project on his hands.

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How to Make a USB Laptop Keyboard Controller

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2019

 

Happy Lunar New Year!

We would like to let our customers know that all OSH Park boards are manufactured in the United States, and we will be operating on a normal schedule during Lunar New Year:

Shipping Information and Turnaround Times

There are two periods of time to think about when making your order:

  • Fabrication time between when you place your order and when we receive boards from the fab.
  • Shipping time between when we ship and when the post office delivers your order to you.

All PCBs ship from Lake Oswego, Oregon, and are fully manufactured in the United States.

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2019

Hackaday Podcast: Igloos, Lidar, And The Blinking LED Of RF Hacking

It’s cold outside! So grab a copy of the Hackaday Podcast, and catch up on what you missed this week.

Highlights include a dip into audio processing with sox and FFMPEG, scripting for Gmail, weaving your own carbon fiber tubes, staring into the sharpest color CRT ever, and unlocking the secrets of cheap 433 MHz devices. Plus Elliot talks about his follies in building an igloo while Mike marvels at what’s coming out of passive RFID sensor research.

And what’s that strange noise at the end of the podcast?

via Hackaday Podcast Ep3 – Igloos, Lidar, And The Blinking LED Of RF Hacking — Hackaday

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The SNES Box Go: Perhaps A First for Console Modding

The SNES Box Go is a relatively simple portable Super Nintendo mod, much like the N64 portables I’ve done in the past. The one key difference here is that this is my first time I’ve used a Flashcart in the build to load the games from ROMs instead of the actual cartridge. I’ve had a little experience with Flashcartswhere I updated an old system of mine with an Everdrive 64 at the end of last year.

via The SNES Box Go: Perhaps A First for Console Modding — Downing’s Basement

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Open Source Biomedical meetup in San Francisco

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Supplyframe’s  meetup in San Francisco is back for 2019!

  • Jean Rintoul () – Spectra: Open Source Biomedical Imaging
  • Beau Ambur – EEG: Thoughts and Visions

HDDG 35: Open Source Biomedical

Thursday, Jan 31, 2019, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe / Hackaday San Francisco Office
500 3rd Street, Suite 230 San Francisco, CA

39 Hardware Developers Attending

Supplyframe’s HDDG is back for 2019. Welcome! Join us to enjoy talks about biomedical engineering this month. Plus snacks and bevs! Jean Rintoul – Spectra: Open Source Biomedical Imaging Beau Ambur – EEG: Thoughts and Visions Jean Rintoul (@jeantoul) has high hopes to improve our healthcare system by pushing forward a health technology commons. Pre…

Check out this Meetup →

The live stream will be available on YouTube:

Open Source Biomedical meetup in San Francisco

Hackaday Podcast: Curious Gadgets And The FPGA Brain Trust

In this week’s podcast, editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys look back on favorite hacks and articles from the week. Highlights include a deep dive in barn-door telescope trackers, listening in on mains power, the backstory of a supercomputer inventor, and crazy test practices with new jet engine designs. We discuss some of our favorite circuit sculptures, and look at a new textile-based computer and an old server-based one.

This week, a round table of who’s-who in the Open Source FPGA movement discusses what’s next in 2019. David Shah, Clifford Wolf, Piotr Esden-Tempski, and Tim Ansell spoke with Elliot at 35C3.

via Hackaday Podcast Ep2 – Curious Gadgets And The FPGA Brain Trust — Hackaday

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