IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

From Dan The Geek‘s blog:
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IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

I wanted to create a few projects interfacing an e-paper display with the Adafruit HUZZAH 8266 and HUZZAH 32. The HUZZAH microcontrollers are a great fit with e-paper displays. In addition to having WiFi connectivity to grab date, weather and calendar information from the internet, they also can power themselves down and wake up at a later time. Since the e-paper displays retain their display without power, this makes for a great symbiotic relationship. Running the HUZZAHs with the e-paper display for just a few minutes each day can allow the device to run for weeks or even months depending on the size of the battery.

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In all, I was very happy with the result. I no longer need to hand solder a dozen or so wires on a small proto board and the final product looks very clean. Having the same board compatible with both the HUZZAH 8266 and HUZZAH 32 is an extra bonus. I am putting the finishing touches on the code for a monthly calendar display and name plate/badge that you can see in the photo at the top of this article. This code will be released to GitHub and described in a future article.

IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on February 20th

Join Chris Gammell, Andrew Sowa, Drew Fustini and many more for the next Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on Wednesday, February 20th:

February 3H Chicago Meetup

Wednesday, Feb 20, 2019, 6:30 PM

Ballast Point Brewing Chicago
212 N Green St Chicago, il

9 Members Attending

Please bring your latest project with you! Anything you’re working on, electrical, mechanical or software works! We want to see the stuff that you’re interested in! Helen Leigh, author of “The Crafty Kids Guide to DIY Electronics” [1] will be in town for this event. She and Drew are setting up the first 3H events outside the US (in Germany and Wal…

Check out this Meetup →

Please bring your latest project with you! Anything you’re working on, electrical, mechanical or software works! We want to see the stuff that you’re interested in!

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Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on February 20th

Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit

Bryan Siepert has published a new Adafruit guide on creating custom circuit boards with EAGLE:

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Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit!

This guide will introduce you to the basic process I use to build PCBs based on Adafruit and other open source designs. We will extract parts of the board files as what Eagle calls “Design Blocks” and then we will use them along with a fundamental workflow in Eagle to create a featherwing-like board for the Trinket M0. This board will allow you to securely attach the Adafruit INA219 current sensor breakout to a Trinket without having to use jumper wires to connect them together. We’re starting with this modest goal to keep things simple as we learn some fundamental concepts, while hopefully also ending up with a useful circuit.

This guide will cover using a Trinket M0 and INA219 breakout, however these same methods can be used to make a PCB to replace the breadboard or protoboard. These techniques can be used to extract useful pieces from open source boards to use in your own completely new circuit boards.

Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit

Hackaday: Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic Call for Talks

Hackaday is known for having the best community around, and we prove this all the time. Every month, we hold meetups across the United States. This, in addition to conferences and mini-cons across the globe mean Hackaday is the premiere venue for technical talks on a wide variety of hardware creation. Everything from Design for Manufacturing, to the implementation of blinky bling is an open topic.

Now, we’re looking for the talk you can give. The Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic is a monthly gathering hosted by Supplyframe, the Overlords of Hackaday. It’s filled with the technical elite of San Francisco, usually held on the last Thursday of the month. We’re looking for a talk you can give, whether it’s about your IoT irrigation system, or that time you created something out of transistors and capacitors.  We’re looking for speakers for all of 2019, and if you have a tale of the trials and tribulations of injection molding or Bluetooth pairing, we want to hear from you.

We have a sign-up form for presenters, and if you have something to present to a group of fantastic, technical people, we want to hear from you. All these talks are streamed and recorded, so if you’d like an idea of what we’re going for, just check out some of the previous talks. We have talks on how to start a decentralized space agencywearable technology and fashionoptics and FPGAs, and System-in-Package tech. We’ve got a speaker travel stipend of up to $300, so there’s no excuse for you not to present your latest work.

There are thousands of people in the Hackaday community that have tons to contribute, and this is your chance. You are the best of the best, and we want to hear what you have to teach the rest of the community.

via Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic Call for Talks — Hackaday

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SparkleCon 2019: day 2 recap by Roger Cheng

From Roger Cheng’s New Screwdriver blog:

SparkleCon Day 2

A great part of SparkCon is its atmosphere. It is basically a block party held by 23b Shop and friends in the same business park. Located in Fullerton, CA, the venue’s neighborhood is a mix of residential, retail, and commercial properties. As a practical matter, this meant good eats like Don Carlos Mexican Restaurant and Monkey Business Cafe were in easy walking distance.

Originally my Day 2 was going to start bright and (too) early for me at 9AM with the KISS Tindies presentation, but the relaxed easygoing nature of the event meant a schedule change was possible and we did it at noon instead. I loved talking to all my fellow people who thought my circuit sculptures were more interesting than a certain football game taking place around the same time.

Emily wants to host a version of Adafruit Hallowing’s default eyeball program on her tiny round CRT. To see how it would look, Emily and Jaren took a video of the Hallowing eyeball and played it back on a Raspberry Pi.

Follow Roger on Twitter for more!

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SparkleCon 2019: day 1 report by Roger Cheng

From Roger Cheng’s blog:

I have arrived at SparkleCon! I had thought this event was just at the hackerspace 23b Shop, but it is actually spread across several venues in the same business park. The original plan also included activity in the parking lot between these venues, but a powerful storm ruined those plans. Given this was in Southern California the locals are not very well equipped to handle any amount rain, never mind the amount that came pouring from the sky today. So people packed into the indoor venues where it was warm and dry. STAGESTheatre is where some talks were held, like.Helen Leigh’s talk From Music Tech Make to Manufacture demonstrating her Mini Mu.

via SparkleCon Day 1 — New Screwdriver


Follow Roger for more from Sparklecon on Twitter. Our Drew Fustini is there too!

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