Review: SMD Tweezer Meter or Tweezer Probes For Your Multimeter?

It’s remarkable how tiny electronics have become. Heaven knows what an old-timer whose experience started with tubes must think, to go from solder tags to SMD in a lifetime is some journey. Even the generation that started with discrete transistors has lived through an incredible shift. But it’s true, SMD components are tiny, and that…

via Review: SMD Tweezer Meter or Tweezer Probes For Your Multimeter? — Hackaday

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Sarah Petkus: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Awesome talk by Sarah Petkus for HDDG last night at Supplyframe in SF:

Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic and mechanical devices which encourage reflection regarding the human relationship with technology.

Their talk will be about a series of wearable augments built to facilitate in sensing, tracking, and indicating one’s level of excitement (or arousal)! Each of the wearables uses a variety of sensors as input to influence quirky electronic and mechanical devices of my design as output. The goal in doing so is not only to create a stellar suit of electronic armor (or amour), but also to help facilitate a dialogue about sex and intimacy amongst my peers that is relatable, honest, healthy, and fun.

Follow Sarah and her projects on Patreon:Screenshot from 2018-07-13 13-00-51.pngSarah Petkus is creating ROBOTS

Sarah Petkus: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Hackaday Superconference: Tickets and Proposal

Get your tickets now for the 2018 Hackaday Superconference. Join us November 2nd-4th in Pasadena, California! This is the ultimate hardware conference. Hackers, designers, and engineers from all over the world converge — from the greenest beginners to those who have made history with their designs. This is the Hackaday community, these are your people,…

via Hackaday Superconference: Tickets and Proposals — Hackaday

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