Finishing the IN-9/IN-13 Nixie Tube Driver for the Raspberry Pi (Part 2)

Mark Smith writes on the Surf ‘n Circuits blog about a Nixie Tube project:

Finishing the IN-9/IN-13 Nixie Tube Driver for the Raspberry Pi (Part 2)

Rarely during product development do you get it correct on the first design iteration. Something always goes wrong or just isn’t perfect. However, like trying for a hole-in-one on a par 3, you always try for perfection but expect to need a few extra strokes. So, while I almost hit a hole in one in the first version of the Nixie Tube HAT (Part 1), a few improvements were required. In this blog, I describe the few improvements found from Part 1 and complete the design to reach stage 6 of the surfncircuits defined development flow. As with the other projects in the blog, the complete design files in Kicad, schematics, layout, BOM, are available at GitHub for use in your own projects. You can build it yourself and the PCB can also be ordered directly from Oshpark.

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BadgeLove meetup in SF on October 18

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Hackster.io is hosting a BadgeLove meetup in San Francisco on Friday, October 18th:

Have you ever created a badge? Are you currently working on a badge? You are invited as a guest of honor to Hackster’s BadgeLove! Meetup. We want to take an evening to appreciate the hardware heroes who do the often thankless and frequently futile task of creating PCB artwork, shitty add-ons, and PCB badges. 

We are excited to toast the winners of last winter’s BadgeLove! contest on Hackster. Come in person, record a video or join via YouTube Live, and show us what you’ve built.

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BadgeLove meetup in SF on October 18

Replicating a Secure Phone Key

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Check out this entertaining talk by John McMaster from HDDG at Supplyframe SF: “Replicating a Secure Phone Key”:

 

For this month’s meetup, we’re going to be joined by John McMaster (@johndmcmaster). John is the Bay Area expert on decapsulating chips and disintegrating circuits. For this Meetup, he’ll be speaking about The Secrets of the NSA Phone Revealed! Actually, it’s more about reproducing a secure phone key with x-rays, micrometers, KiCad and a 3D printer.
Replicating a Secure Phone Key

Introducing our “After Dark” black FR-4 service

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Our new 2 layer “After Dark” service features black FR-4 substrate with clear soldermask to show off all those beautiful copper traces.

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Our “After Dark” service is the same cost as our 2 layer purple PCBs: $5 per square inch, which includes three copies of your design. For example, a 2 square inch board would cost $10 and you’d get three copies of your board. You can order as many copies as you want, as long as they’re in multiples of three.

Aaron (@TwinkleTwinkie) wrote a nice post on Hackaday.io about making:

PCB Art with OSHPark After Dark

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Here are some examples of “After Dark” from Twitter:

Introducing our “After Dark” black FR-4 service

Open Hardware Month this October

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October is Open Hardware Month and OSHWA wants to encourage locally organized events around the world.

Interested in hosting an Open Source Hardware themed meetup or workshop?

Please add it to the list here:
http://ohm.oshwa.org/

It is okay for some details of your event to be announced later.  OSHWA is trying to get an initial list published on September 4th so people will have some sense of which cities are participating.

Open Hardware Month this October

Micro-Sized Flex for Commercial Quality Bodging

We love watching the creativity unleashed by the democratization of once-exotic technologies. The casualness by which one can order a cheap, small run of PCBs has unlocked a flood of fine pitch components and projects which look commercial quality even with a total build volume of one. Now the once mythical flex PCB has been falling from it’s stratospheric pricing and with OSHPark’s offering it feels like we’re at the inflection point. [qwertymodo] leveraged this by creating a beautifully twisted flex to add link port support to the Super Game Boy

In the mid-90’s Nintendo released the Super Game Boy, a cartridge for the SNES which allowed you to play Game Boy games on the big screen. Each cartridge was in fact an entire Game Boy with the appropriate hardware to present it in a way the host console could interface with, but missing some of the hardware a standalone Game Boy would include like a link port to connect it to another system. This mod fixes this limitation by bridging the correct pins out from the CPU to a breakout board which includes the link port connector. For general background on what’s going on here, check out [Brian]’s article from Aprildescribing a different mod [qwertymodo] executed to the same system.

What’s fascinating is how elegant the mod is. Using a a flex here to create a completely custom, strangely shaped, one-of-a-kind adapter for this random IC, in low volume is an awesome example of the use of advanced manufacturing techniques to take our hacks to the next level.

via Micro-Sized Flex for Commercial Quality Bodging — Hackaday

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