SparkleCon 2019: day 2 recap by Roger Cheng

From Roger Cheng’s New Screwdriver blog:

SparkleCon Day 2

A great part of SparkCon is its atmosphere. It is basically a block party held by 23b Shop and friends in the same business park. Located in Fullerton, CA, the venue’s neighborhood is a mix of residential, retail, and commercial properties. As a practical matter, this meant good eats like Don Carlos Mexican Restaurant and Monkey Business Cafe were in easy walking distance.

Originally my Day 2 was going to start bright and (too) early for me at 9AM with the KISS Tindies presentation, but the relaxed easygoing nature of the event meant a schedule change was possible and we did it at noon instead. I loved talking to all my fellow people who thought my circuit sculptures were more interesting than a certain football game taking place around the same time.

Emily wants to host a version of Adafruit Hallowing’s default eyeball program on her tiny round CRT. To see how it would look, Emily and Jaren took a video of the Hallowing eyeball and played it back on a Raspberry Pi.

Follow Roger on Twitter for more!

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SparkleCon 2019: day 1 report by Roger Cheng

From Roger Cheng’s blog:

I have arrived at SparkleCon! I had thought this event was just at the hackerspace 23b Shop, but it is actually spread across several venues in the same business park. The original plan also included activity in the parking lot between these venues, but a powerful storm ruined those plans. Given this was in Southern California the locals are not very well equipped to handle any amount rain, never mind the amount that came pouring from the sky today. So people packed into the indoor venues where it was warm and dry. STAGESTheatre is where some talks were held, like.Helen Leigh’s talk From Music Tech Make to Manufacture demonstrating her Mini Mu.

via SparkleCon Day 1 — New Screwdriver


Follow Roger for more from Sparklecon on Twitter. Our Drew Fustini is there too!

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How to Make a USB Laptop Keyboard Controller

This video by Frank Adams shows how to make a USB laptop keyboard controller:

This video and “Instructable” describe how to make a USB controller for a laptop keyboard. I designed a circuit card for a Teensy LC or 3.2 that connects to a keyboard FPC cable with up to 34 pins on a 1mm or 0.8mm pitch.

 writes on Hackaday about the project:

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[Frank Adams] liked the keyboard on his Lenovo ThinkPad T61 so much that he decided to design an adapter so he could use it over USB with the Teensy microcontroller. He got the Trackpoint working, and along the way managed to add support for a number of other laptop boards as well. Before you know it, he had a full-blown open source project on his hands.

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How to Make a USB Laptop Keyboard Controller

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2019

 

Happy Lunar New Year!

We would like to let our customers know that all OSH Park boards are manufactured in the United States, and we will be operating on a normal schedule during Lunar New Year:

Shipping Information and Turnaround Times

There are two periods of time to think about when making your order:

  • Fabrication time between when you place your order and when we receive boards from the fab.
  • Shipping time between when we ship and when the post office delivers your order to you.

All PCBs ship from Lake Oswego, Oregon, and are fully manufactured in the United States.

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2019

Hackaday Podcast: Igloos, Lidar, And The Blinking LED Of RF Hacking

It’s cold outside! So grab a copy of the Hackaday Podcast, and catch up on what you missed this week.

Highlights include a dip into audio processing with sox and FFMPEG, scripting for Gmail, weaving your own carbon fiber tubes, staring into the sharpest color CRT ever, and unlocking the secrets of cheap 433 MHz devices. Plus Elliot talks about his follies in building an igloo while Mike marvels at what’s coming out of passive RFID sensor research.

And what’s that strange noise at the end of the podcast?

via Hackaday Podcast Ep3 – Igloos, Lidar, And The Blinking LED Of RF Hacking — Hackaday

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The SNES Box Go: Perhaps A First for Console Modding

The SNES Box Go is a relatively simple portable Super Nintendo mod, much like the N64 portables I’ve done in the past. The one key difference here is that this is my first time I’ve used a Flashcart in the build to load the games from ROMs instead of the actual cartridge. I’ve had a little experience with Flashcartswhere I updated an old system of mine with an Everdrive 64 at the end of last year.

via The SNES Box Go: Perhaps A First for Console Modding — Downing’s Basement

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