AXIOM: open source cinema camera at FOSDEM

Sebastian Pichelhofer of Apertus gave an exciting talk at FOSDEM earlier this year and the video is now on YouTube:

AXIOM – open source cinema camera Project Introduction and current state of development

The presentation will give a brief overview of the projects history & lessons learned during the course of developing a high tech camera device as community project. We also want to demo and explain the produced hardware, enclosures and sample footage then look at the challenges still ahead. Last 5 minutes reserved for Q&A

Screenshot from 2020-07-26 16-04-03

AXIOM: open source cinema camera at FOSDEM

The nRF9160 Feather Is Now Served

Jared Wolff has design a Feather form factor board with the nRF9160:

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The nRF9160 Feather Is Now Served

Low-power shutdown, built-in 4FF SIM card slot, flexible power supply, and more.

I was a complete failure. My prototype wasn’t working. I spent at least an hour trying to rework a frustratingly large LTE module on an impossibly small circuit board.

It wasn’t going to work.

So I went back to the drawing board. I poured my years of hardware experience into a tiny form factor.

The end product?

Something smart. Something with LTE, NB-IoT, and GPS. Something anyone could get started with right away.

And thus, the nRF9160 Feather was born.

I need your help! 🙏

To make this campaign a reality, I need your help to meet our minimum order quantity of nRF9160 Feathers. Without that, we’re dead in the water! Head on over to the campaign page to reserve yours.

For those of you who’ve already committed, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. I can’t wait to get the nRF9160 Feather into your hands!

P.S. Huge thanks to Hackster and GroupGets for making this happen. You guys and girls are great. ❤

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The nRF9160 Feather Is Now Served

Ordering from OSH Stencils is now easier

Back in 2019, we added ability to order a stencil for your board design from OSH Stencils:

We have extended that capability so you can order from OSH Stencils based on the paste layers from your past OSH Park orders:
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Ordering from OSH Stencils is now easier

Printed TS100 Case Beats the Heat with a Bearing

As we’ve said many times in the past, the creation of custom cases and enclosures is one of the best and most obvious applications for desktop 3D printing. When armed with even an entry-level printer, your projects will never again have to suffer through the indignity of getting hot glued into a nondescript plastic box. But if you’re printing with basic PLA, you need to be careful that nothing gets too hot inside.

Which was a problem when [Oleg Vint] started work on this 3D printed case for the popular TS100 soldering iron. But with the addition of a standard 608 bearing, the case provides a safe spot for the iron to cool off before it gets buttoned back up for storage. Of course, you can also use the flip-out perch to hold the iron while you’re working.

As [Oleg] explains on the Thingiverse page for the case, he actually blended a few existing projects together to arrive at the final design. Specifically, the idea of using the 608 bearing came from a printable TS100 stand originally designed in 2017 by [MightyNozzle]. Released under Creative Commons, [Oleg] was able to mash the bearing stand together with elements from several other printable TS100 cases to come up with his unique combined solution.

via Printed TS100 Case Beats the Heat with a Bearing — Hackaday

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Custom 16×16 matrix display PCB

Erik van Zijst writes about their latest project made with our “After Dark” service:
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For a previous project I explored what it would take to create a text marquee on an 8×8 LED matrix display without microcontroller, using only 7400 chips, an old EEPROM and breadboard components. Matrix Displays I was interested in using an LED matrix display and I picked up some cheap 8×8 ones on Amazon. medium.com That worked, but 8×8 is very small to do anything interesting and so I wanted to give it another go, create a larger 16×16 panel, design a custom PCB and ultimately hook it up to a microcontroller this time to write some games for it.

View at Medium.com

Custom 16×16 matrix display PCB

iCE Bling: Beautiful LED Earrings with Lattice iCE40 FPGA

has created wondeful LED Earrings with the Lattice iCE40UP5k FPGA and shared the project on our website:

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Screenshot from 2020-07-19 14-10-16

Find out more about the project in this blog post:

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iCE Bling FPGA – Beautiful LED Earrings with Lattice iCE40

It’s the same story every year. At the horizon is a loved one’s birthday, or an anniversary, and I want to make them something special. Buying something won’t do. Oh no, I have to design and build it myself. I would then start with a simple idea, and then complicate it progressively to the point where it would take several anniversaries to finish the project.

This time, I wanted to build a pair of earrings for my wife’s birthday. Since I am learning about FPGAs these days, I wanted to incorporate one into the design. Having gotten older and wiser, I decided to enlist help early on. I would focus on the overall design and the programming part, and leave the PCB design and assembly to my trusted friend and engineer Siva.

 

iCE Bling: Beautiful LED Earrings with Lattice iCE40 FPGA

Jerry Lawson: Father of the Video Game Cartridge

Jerry Lawson was an engineer from New York who had arrived at Fairchild Semiconductor in 1970 after having worked at various companies in the defense electronics industry. Working as part of their customer engagement effort, he achieved prominence in the company by revolutionising the point of contact with the customer using an RV (yes, a camping vehicle) converted as a demonstration lab for Fairchild products. He was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time to be a member of the famous Homebrew Computer Club, cradle of so much of the later microcomputer industry, which put him at the center of a web of contacts covering the games business as it was in the early 1970s.

Though his employer was not involved in gaming, Jerry got his start in that field as a side project. When his friend Allan Alcorn installed the first Pong machine in Andy Capp’s Tavern it suffered from customers interfering with its coin mechanism to score free plays, so Jerry produced a game cabinet of his own called Demolition Derby that had a more robust system. This led to Fairchild Semiconductor International offering him the chance to start their new video game division, and the road to the Channel F was laid.

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There are many names from the annals of computing history who roll off the tongue. People such as Jobs and Wozniak, Bushnell, Dabney, Sinclair, Miyamoto, or Miner. We should also add Jerry Lawson to that list, as his vision to make one console and sell multiple games, done inexpensively with the use of the PCB edge connector, set the standard for decades to come.

via Jerry Lawson And The Fairchild Channel F; Father of the Video Game Cartridge — Hackaday

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RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

We were exited to see this use of a flex PCB to create a backplane for the RC2014:

RC2014 is a simple 8 bit Z80 based modular computer originally built to run Microsoft BASIC. It is inspired by the home built computers of the late 70s and computer revolution of the early 80s. It is not a clone of anything specific, but there are suggestions of the ZX81, UK101, S100, Superboard II and Apple I in here. It nominally has 8K ROM, 32K RAM, runs at 7.3728MHz and communicates over serial at 115,200 baud.

RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

Alvaro Prieto’s Chaac Weather Station

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From Gareth Halfacree on Hackster:

Alvaro Prieto Walks Through a Year of Chaac Weather Station Designs, Upgrades, and Enhancements

Alvaro Prieto has published a write-up of his latest weather station board, the Chaac v4.0, which adds Bluetooth connectivity to his existing XBee-based design.

The Chaac project has been ongoing for some time: Prieto documented his original efforts to build a weather station a year ago, walking through a range of improvements that went from an nRF52-based Bluetooth Low Energy prototype through to a breakout board for the Nucleo development board, and the integrated Chaac board versions 1.0 through 1.2 — the latter adding in solar panel voltage monitoring.

In the year since, Prieto has been working on upgrading the Chaac design — and has gathered all the improvements into a single write-up, beginning with the Chaac v2.0 which combined the existing XBee-based communication system with an nRF52811 for Bluetooth connectivity.

Alvaro Prieto’s Chaac Weather Station