SF Hardware meetup this week with Sarah Petkus

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The next Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic (HDDG) take place at SupplyFrame in San Francisco this Thursday with Sarah Petkus and Ryan Cousins:

HDDG 32: Communicating with the Unseen

Come enjoy yummy snacks and bevs and hear fascinating talks by these kickass engineers.

Sarah Petkus – SHE BON: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Ryan Cousins – How and Why We Failed at Everything (So You Don’t Have To)

HDDG 32: Communicating with the Unseen

Thursday, Jul 12, 2018, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe / Hackaday San Francisco Office
500 3rd Street, Suite 230 San Francisco, CA

54 Hardware Developers Attending

Come enjoy yummy snacks and bevs and hear fascinating talks by these kickass engineers. Sarah Petkus – SHE BON: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen Ryan Cousins – How and Why We Failed at Everything (So You Don’t Have To) Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic an…

Check out this Meetup →

Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic and mechanical devices which encourage reflection regarding the human relationship with technology.

Their talk will be about a series of wearable augments built to facilitate in sensing, tracking, and indicating one’s level of excitement (or arousal)! Each of the wearables uses a variety of sensors as input to influence quirky electronic and mechanical devices of my design as output. The goal in doing so is not only to create a stellar suit of electronic armor (or amour), but also to help facilitate a dialogue about sex and intimacy amongst my peers that is relatable, honest, healthy, and fun.

Ryan Cousins is cofounder and CEO of krtkl inc. Based in Silicon Valley, krtkl (“critical”) makes life easier for companies developing heavily connected and automated products. Ryan earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering – with an emphasis in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics – from UCLA. He has worked in both R&D and business capacities across a variety of markets, including medical and embedded, and has been granted a European patent.

After years of working on embedded systems, product development, manufacturing, and startup-ing, Ryan has had the “pleasure” of experiencing nearly every type of failure a hardware business has to offer. Ryan will share some humorous – and horrifying – anecdotes from his arduous journey, along with some key takeaways that will (hopefully) prevent others from making the same mistakes.

After the talks, there will be demos, community announcements, and socializing. If you’d like to give a 2 minute demo/ community announcement, please see the organizers when you arrive to get set up.

A community announcement includes looking for a project partner, a job, offering a project/ job, the announcement of your startup launch, your Crowdfunding pitch, etc.

We’re looking forward to seeing you Thursday, July 12th, at 6:30pm!

SF Hardware meetup this week with Sarah Petkus

Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 2018

If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

When you can get a decent (but let’s be clear, not great) 3D printer for $200 USD, it’s no surprise that American and European manufacturers are having a hard time staying competitive. But not everyone is seduced by low-cost printers. They know they could buy a decent printer for a couple hundred bucks, but for them that’s not the point. Some hackers are just as (if not more) interested in designing and building the machines than they are churning out little plastic boats with the finished product.

Luckily for us, these are also the type of folks who document their builds and make all their collected information and design files available for others under an open source license. Such builders exemplify the true spirit of the RepRap movement, and we’re happy to report that in a sea of imported printers, there were several interesting home built open source printers.

Whether you want to build your own copy of one of these machines, or simply get inspired by some of the ideas their creators had, these machines are physical proof that just because you can order a cheap 3D printer on eBay right now doesn’t mean you have to.

via Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18 — Hackaday

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Hackaday Journal Completes First Review Process, Seeks More Submissions

Congratulations and thank you go to Theodore Yapo for authoring the first paper to complete the peer review process for the Hackaday Journal. You can read the standalone paper here; it will be included in the first volume of the Hackaday Journal officially released later this year. The Hackaday Journal is an open access, peer…

via Hackaday Journal Completes First Review Process, Seeks More Submissions — Hackaday

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Story of a SparkFun AVC Rover

Multi-year adventure of building JRover from scratch, as told by its creator, Jesse Brockmann, on the SparkFun blog:

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Story of a SparkFun AVC Rover

I first started working on my SparkFun AVC rover back in 2011, but I didn’t have a finished rover until 2014. I first heard about the competition on the SparkFun site and thought AVC would be a great challenge – even then I thought self-driving cars would become mainstream. I hope I can provide some useful information for those of you working on or considering making a rover.

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My latest rover uses the following components:

  • Traxxas Slash 4×4 Platinum LCG Truck
  • Anaconda street tires
  • Traxxas RPM sensor
  • RC4WD 35-turn brushed motor
  • Castle ESC
  • 3S 5400mah LiPo
  • Teensy 3.5
  • 2GB+ micro SD card
  • BNO-055 IMU
  • Headers
  • Various jumper wires
  • Tactile Buttons
  • Custom JRover Baseboard and Button Board
  • Digole 2” LCD display
  • Airplane RC transmitter and receiver with PPM output
  • USB battery bank

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Story of a SparkFun AVC Rover

Video Quick-Bit: The Things That Move Robots

Magenta Strongheart returns for a look at some of the coolest robotic entries from this year’s Hackaday Prize. Each of these answered the challenge for modular designs that will help supercharge new robot projects. We think that cheap and abundant motor designs are poised to revolutionize robotics and several of the entries thought along those…

via Video Quick-Bit: The Things That Move Robots — Hackaday

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