The Incredible Judges Of The Hackaday Prize

The time to enter The Hackaday Prize has ended, but that doesn’t mean we’re done with the world’s greatest hardware competition just yet. Over the past few months, we’ve gotten a sneak peek at over a thousand amazing projects, from Open Hardware to Human Computer Interfaces. This is a contest, though, and to decide the winner,…

via The Incredible Judges Of The Hackaday Prize — Hackaday

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Advanced Assembly factory tour this Thursday (10/25)

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If you’re in the Denver area, join Laen and Drew for an open house at our new assembly partner: Advanced Assembly!

Join us for pizza, beer and tours of our newly remodeled, high-tech facility as we celebrate 14 years in business. Bring your co-workers too!

Please RSVP

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Advanced Assembly factory tour this Thursday (10/25)

OHS18 badge: accelerometer demo, adapter board, Tindie listing

Updates for the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge project:

MicroPython demo app for the Accelerometer

Want to use the KX122-1037 Accelerometer (datasheet) on the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge?

USB-to-Serial adapter board

This adapter board to connects a USB-to-serial cable to the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge.

Extra badges being sold on Tindie

The extra badges from the Summit are being sold here on Tindie as a fundraiser for the Ada Lovelace Fellowship which provides travel assistance to the Open Hardware Summit. All sales revenue will be 100% donated to the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) for this purpose.

OHS18 badge: accelerometer demo, adapter board, Tindie listing

Challenge Your Soldering Skills With Snowy0201

From  on the Tindie blog:

Snowy0201_from_NWMaker_on_Tindie.jpg

The Snowy Owl is the rebel of owls. They live in the north near arctic regions of the world, and unlike other owls, they are active during the day instead of the night. Owls in general are pretty great, which is why this Snowy Owl version of the Surface Mount Device 0201 soldering challenge kit caught my eye.

For this challenge, the resistors on the back of the owl have been changed to a 0201 packages for an additional level of difficulty. These are cellphone-level miniaturization so it will be a challenge. A dual inverter NL27WZ04 is used to implement the ring oscillator, which drives the blinking LEDs.

Think you’re up to the challenge?

 

Challenge Your Soldering Skills With Snowy0201

USB-to-serial adapter board for Open Hardware Summit badge

This adapter board to connects a USB-to-serial cable to the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge.

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The badge features an ESP32 microcontroller running MicroPython firmware.  The firmware provides a Python interpreter prompt (REPL) on the serial port which allows interactive programming of the badge!

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A previous blog post describes how to build and flash new MicroPython firmware to the badge:

 

The KiCad design files are shared on GitHub:

oshwabadge2018/adapter-board

Screenshot from 2018-10-20 02-25-11.pngThe board has been shared on OSH Park:

OSH Park: adapter board for USB-to-serial cable

Screenshot from 2018-10-18 00-02-21

Order from OSH Park

Bill of Materials (BoM)

  • Switch for programming mode
    • E-Switch EG1218
    • Slide Switch SPDT
    • Digi-Key: EG1903-ND
  • Pushbutton for reset
    • Omron B3F-1000
    • Tactile Switch SPST-NO
    • Digi-Key: SW400-ND
  • Header for FTDI usb-to-serial cable
    • TE AMP 9-146282-0-06
    • 1×6 Pin Header 0.1″ pitch
    • Digi-Key: A34253-06-ND
  • Header to connect J1 socket on badge
    • Harwin M20-9720345
    • 2×3 Pin Header 0.1″ pitch
    • Digi-Key: 952-1921-ND
  • J1 header socket on the badge
    • Harwin 952-1781-ND
    • 2×3 Header Socket 0.1″ pitch
    • Digi-Key: M20-7830346

Digi-Key shopping cart

Screenshot from 2018-10-20 02-28-43

Resources:

USB-to-serial adapter board for Open Hardware Summit badge

Packing a Lot Into a Little PCB: Winners of the Square Inch Project on Hackaday

It is mind-boggling when you think about the computing power that fits in the palm of your hand these days. It wasn’t long ago when air-conditioned rooms with raised floors hosted computers far less powerful that filled the whole area. Miniaturization is certainly the order of the day. Things are getting smaller every day, too. We were so impressed with the minuscule entries from the first “Square Inch Project” — a contest challenging designers to use 1 inch2 of PCB or less — that we decided bring it back with the Return of the Square Inch Project. The rules really were simple: build something with a PCB that was a square inch.

via Packing a Lot Into a Little PCB: Winners of the Square Inch Project — Hackaday

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