Micro:Boy – Arcade games for the Micro:bit

ɖҿϝիɟթվ created this project to play arcade games on the Micro:bit:

3938441516919484314.jpg

Micro:Boy

The Micro:bit is a pretty decent platform for teaching kids to program, but you can’t really make arcade-style games for it. You only have two buttons and a 5×5 display. Perhaps enough for a very small snake game, but that’s pretty much it. That’s why I started working on #PewPew FeatherWing as an alternative platform, but at some point I started wondering if it’s really impossible to do it on the micro:bit.

9529311516408706440

When the most recent version of micropython got the ability to use any pins for I2C, I realized that I can finally connect a display easily. I could use a HT16K33 and a 8×8 LED matrix like on the PewPew, but I decided to try something else — a monochrome OLED display, similar to the one used on many Arduino-based game consoles.

Micro:Boy – Arcade games for the Micro:bit

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

 writes on the Tindie blog:

okay2-Medium

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

Take a look at Tindie’s thriving sound section and you’ll see there is no shortage of people making their own electronic music. These devices take many forms, and one interesting take on sound creation is the OKAY 2 Synth DIY Kit. At face value it features 2 octaves of keys, a built-in amplifier along with a 1/4″ line out, and knobs to select the octaves that you’d like to play — but it gets more interesting under the hood.

Oskitone OKAY 2 from oskitone on Vimeo.

What makes it unique by today’s standards is that it doesn’t use any sort of computer or microcontroller, but instead produces sound using an LM555 timer along with other discreet components for monophonic sound. Given its small size, you could use two at once, perhaps combining them via the line out to be further modified in your synth setup!

In case you’re wondering, the original—or nearly so as it’s version 1.1.1—OKAY is also available. It works largely the same as the OKAY 2, but features only a single octave of keys, and doesn’t have an audio output jack.

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

reDot Smart 5×7 LED Matrix

Alex on Hackaday.io is working on a smart miniature (DIP6) 5×7 LED Matrix:

5081641517597723580.JPG

reDOT_smart

This project is based on my #reDOT project. Basicly it is a 5×7 SMD LED Matrix an a microcontroller on one PCB. I started wirh 0201 LEDs (see first project log), but this was not reliable. So a second version with 0402 is in development. 0402 LEDs do have some benefits over 0201:

  • bigger and you can solder them better
  • cheaper
  • more colors availible

The microcontroller (a low coast STM8) drives all LEDs directly with multiplexing. For controlling a UART interface is available. The dimensions are like a DIP-6 package. For easy connection of multiple PCBs, the pads are castellated. Also the supply rails are available on both sides. So multiple of these display can be soldered together to a bigger display without the need of additional wiring.

reDot Smart 5×7 LED Matrix

A Talking Clock For The 21st Century

 writes on the Hackaday blog:

A Talking Clock For The 21st Century

[Nick Sayer] used the USNO Master Clock telephone feed to see in the New Year, but had to make do with a voice from another time zone. It seems that there are no services remaining that provide one in Pacific time. His solution to the problem for a future year? Make his own Talking Clock, one that derives its time reference from GPS.

3078801516333157031.jpg

At its heart is a SkyTraq Venus838LPx miniature GPS module coupled to an ATMega32E5 microcontroller. The speech comes in the form of pre-recorded samples stored on an SD card. There is a small on-board amplifier to drive a single speaker. For extreme authenticity perhaps it could be attached to a GSM mobile phone module to provide a dial-up service, but he’s got everything he needs for a New Years Eve.

 

 

A Talking Clock For The 21st Century

Disintegrated LM3909 LED Flasher by Dillon Nichols

From Dillon on hackaday.io:

2273471514950580143

Disintegrated LM3909 – 1.5V LED Flasher

A clone of National Semiconductor’s LM3909 IC using discrete components on a PCB.

 

Dillon1337 has shared the board on OSH Park:

Disintegrated LM3909

39a02109ee600ff5701817dac92812a0

Order from OSH Park

KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

dwaq/LM3909

Here is a video of the project in action:

Disintegrated LM3909 LED Flasher by Dillon Nichols

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2018

Happy Lunar New Year!

We would like to let our customers know that all OSH Park boards are manufactured in the United States, and we will be operating on a normal schedule during Lunar New Year:

Shipping Information and Turnaround Times

There are two periods of time to think about when making your order:

  • Fabrication time between when you place your order and when we receive boards from the fab.
  • Shipping time between when we ship and when the post office delivers your order to you.

All PCBs ship from Lake Oswego, Oregon, and are fully manufactured in the United States.

Normal schedule during Lunar New Year 2018

Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks and Workshops

From Andrew Back:

OSHCamp2014_Workshop-768x0-c-default

Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks & Workshops

This year’s Open Source Hardware Camp will be hosted at The Blue Room in the historic county town of Lincoln, over the weekend of Sat 30th June & Sun 1st July. Lincoln is home to, amongst others, noted engine builders Ruston & Hornsby — now Siemens, via GEC and English Electric — and is well served by rail, reachable from Leeds and London within 2-2.5 hours, and 4-5 hours from Edinburgh and Southampton.

The call for talks and workshops has now gone out, there is no theme and topics may include, for example:

  • Open source hardware projects
  • Open development practices and principles
  • Novel/interesting/fun projects built using open source hardware
  • Tools (hardware and software)
  • Skills and techniques, e.g. PCB fab, DIY SMT assembly
  • Relevant technologies, e.g. SPI/I2C bus programming
  • …something else relevant to the community

If you would like to give a talk on the Saturday and/or run a workshop on the Sunday, please submit details via the online form.

Open Source Hardware Camp 2018 call for Talks and Workshops