Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

I attended the 36th Chaos Communication Congress (36c3) during the last
week of 2019 in Leipzig, Germany.  It was an amazing event and Hackaday has good coverage.  All the talks are available online including my talk:

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Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

Want to run Linux on open hardware? This talk will explore Open Source Hardware projects capable of that task, and explore how RISC-V and free software FPGA projects can be leveraged to create libre systems.

The video is also available on YouTube:

My slides are on SlideShare:

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The slides are also available as a PDF on GitHub.

Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

Open Source Hardware in industry – meet DIN SPEC 3105

Martin Häuer of Open Source Ecology Germany gave a talk at 36c3 about a recent effort to create a standard for Open Source Hardware with DIN (the German Institute for Standardization):
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Open Source Hardware in industry – meet DIN SPEC 3105

Compared to software, the open source approach is relatively new to most actors in the field of (mechanical) hardware.

Plus Open Source Hardware faces some special issues. A yet missing definition of its “source code” is one of them (+ patent law, liability, engineers that do not know how to work with git, costly prototyping…)

DIN SPEC 3105 will be/is the first official standard for Open Source Hardware and also the first official standard ever published under a free license (CC-BY-SA 4.0; that was a lot of lobby work 😉 ). It defines the technology-specific “source” of Open Source Hardware and aims to build a bridge between research institutes, public authority, industry and the worldwide open source community.

Here is a PDF of the slides: OSH Standardisation-36c3

Screenshot from 2020-01-11 11-23-34To look into the standards themselves:

Additional information is hosted on GitLab:

Technology-specific Documentation Criteria (TsDC) specify the requirements for the technical documentation of Open Source Hardware (OSH). A TsDC is created (yet manually) by OSH projects/developers and is a subset of the TsDC database (TsDC-DB) provided in this repository. The concept of a TsDC was initially mentioned in DIN SPEC 3105-1 (since v0.3) and probably will be mainly used in this context.

Learn more about Open Source Ecology Germany on their website:

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Enable a sustainable way of life and the emergence of an open source economy through self-created and freely available means of production .

Open Source Hardware in industry – meet DIN SPEC 3105

The first Adafruit Show ‘n Tell of 2020

Joining Adafruit Show ‘n Tell with Helen Leigh was a fun way to start 2020!

Helen embroidered the CircuitPython-powered Serpente board from Arturo at Chaos Communication Congress (36c3):

I showed Linux running on a RISC-V core in the ECP5 FPGA on the Hackaday Supercon badge:

I gave a shout-out to Greg Davill who got Linux booting the OrangeCrab while at 36c3:

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Greg’s open hardware OrangeCrab board features the ECP5 FPGA in an Adafruit Feather form factor and is capable of running a RISC-V “soft” core using LiteX.

Find out more about Linux on RISC-V using open source FPGA toolchains in the slides from my 36c3 talk

The first Adafruit Show ‘n Tell of 2020

Bunnie at 36C3: Open Source is Insufficient to Solve Trust Problems in Hardware

On his talk this year at the 36C3, [bunnie] showed a detailed insight of several attack vectors we could face during manufacturing. Skipping the obvious ones like adding or substituting components, he’s focusing on highly ambitious and hard to detect modifications inside an IC’s package with wirebonded or through-silicon via (TSV) implants, down to modifying the netlist or mask of the integrated circuit itself. And these aren’t any theoretical or “what if” scenarios, but actual possible options — of course, some of them come with a certain price tag, but in the end, with the right motivation, money is only a detail.

Sure, none of this is particularly feasible or even much of interest at all for a blinking LED project, but considering how more and more open source hardware projects emerge to replace fully proprietary components, especially with a major focus on privacy, a lack of trust in the hardware involved along the way is surely worrying to say the least. At this point, there is no perfect solution in sight, but FPGAs might just be the next best thing, and the next part of the talk is presenting the Betrusted prototype that [bunnie] is working on together with [xobs] and [Tom Marble]. That alone makes the talk worth watching, in our view.

via 36C3: Open Source is Insufficient to Solve Trust Problems in Hardware — Hackaday

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Hackaday at the 36th Chaos Communication Congress (36c3)

Drew (@pdp7) is at the Chaos Communication Congress (36c3) and so is the Hackaday community:

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It’s that time of year again here in Germany. The mulled wine flows all night long at the Christmas markets, the Krampus runs wild in the streets, and hackers are perched frantically behind their keyboards and soldering irons, trying to get their last minute projects “finished” for the 36th annual Chaos Communication Congress (36C3) in Leipzig.

We’ll have an assembly for all fans and friends of the Jolly Wrencher, so if you’re coming to Congress, you can come join us or at least stop by and say hi. [Elliot] and [Sven] and a number of Hackaday.io luminaries will be on hand. (Ask us about secret stickers and an as-yet unannounced upcoming Hackaday conference.)

Even if you’re not able to make it, you should keep your eyes on Hackaday from the 27th to the 30th, because we’ll be reporting on the best of Congress. But you don’t have to take our word for it: the Chaos Computer Club makes all of the talks available on livestream during the event, many with simultaneous translation, and final edited versions often appearing just a few hours afterwards.

We’ve looked through the schedule, and it’s going to be a hum-dinger! Gather ’round the glowing box with your friends at your own local hackerspace, or call in sick from work and make yourself some popcorn. This is must-see nerd TV.

Whether you’ve been naughty or nice, swing by our assembly if you’re going to be in Leipzig for the last few days of 2019. See you there!

via Hackaday is Going to the 36th Chaos Communication Congress — Hackaday

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Talk about Open Source Hardware tonight at Chaos Communication Congress (36c3)

I am speaking tonight 19:45 at the Chaos Communication Congress (36c3) in Leipzig, Germany, on the Critical Decentralization Cluster stage:

Introduction to Open Source Hardware, OSHWA and the Open Hardware Summit

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PDF of the slides is available for download from GitHub.

 

Talk about Open Source Hardware tonight at Chaos Communication Congress (36c3)