ESP8266 Power Switch

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ESP8266 Power Switch

The DomCo Electronics, Inc. ESP8266 AC Power Switch is everything you need to get started with controlling AC mains from an ESP8266. We know dealing with AC can be intimidating for people at times and we wanted to simplify the process of making your own IoT device.

Everything you need to control a 100-240VAC 50/60Hz load is built right onto the board. Simply solder on a power lead and socket of your choice to the Power Switch and the on-board code can get you up and started in minutes. (We have a USA power tail and socket in the optional extras below.) No more needing to wire up an ESP board, a Wall wart, an IoT Power Relay (Power Tail), and a bunch of wires just to control your light or coffee maker.

ESP8266 Power Switch

SF Hardware Startup meetup on Wednesday

The SF Hardware Startup Meetup is this Wednesday evening in San Francisco:

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Hardware Studio | Kickstarter, Avnet, & Dragon Innovation

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018, 7:00 PM

Bolt
724 Brannan St. San Francisco, ca

259 Startup-Hardwarians Attending

Hey Hardwarians! Ready for another SF Hardware Startup Meetup!? This time around we’re sponsored by the folks fueling Hardware Studio. Hardware Studio is a new initiative from Kickstarter, Avnet, and Dragon Innovation, providing resources and support for independent hardware creators. The goal of the initiative is to help teams be better prepared f…

Check out this Meetup →

 Look for our Drew Fustini in purple!

SF Hardware Startup meetup on Wednesday

Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

Miasma is a pure analog oscillator module based on the Curtis CEM3340 chips used in legendary ’80s synths, with new & innovative signal patching:Screenshot from 2018-02-17 12-51-02.png

Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

We designed the Miasma Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) to bring that classic ’80s synthesizer sound back to Eurorack modular systems. We just couldn’t find any currently available oscillators with the sound textures and capabilities that we wanted, so we had to design our own; and now you get to own one as well.  

There are many unique capabilities built into Miasma that you won’t find in any other oscillator module, like the built-in patching and cross modulation structures that make Miasma so flexible in your rack. However, it’s all about the sound – so let’s start with some Miasma audio samples, before we go into the technical details of how we make that sound possible (best listening with Headphones!)

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Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

Reflowduino: Circuit Board Assembly for Everyone

Timothy Woo has launched a Indiegogo campaign to manufacture his open-source, Arduino-compatible, wireless PCB reflow oven controller:

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Reflowduino: Circuit Board Assembly for Everyone!

Reflowduino is the first completely open-source, Arduino-compatible reflow oven controller of its kind that enables practically anyone to assemble their own beautiful circuit boards at home!

Reflowduino comes loaded with features, all in a compact Arduino-compatible package, with full documentation, example code, demo app, and comprehensive wiki on Github.

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Reflowduino is designed to be extremely easy to use! The general concept is to switch the power of the appliance on or off with a solid-state relay as shown below, measuring the temperature by placing the thermocouple tip inside the oven during the whole process.

If nothing else, please share this campaign to your friends, family, and anyone who might be interested on social media! Remember that every view counts for me, and I’m depending on you to make this happen!

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Reflowduino: Circuit Board Assembly for Everyone

Vectrex cartridge board

From Frank Buss on hackaday.io:

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Vectrex cartridge

This is my first version of a PCB for building a Vectrex cartridge. I used this for my Kickstarter project for the Bloxorz game. The PCB was manufactured by @oshpark , you can order your board here.

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It fits in this 3D printed case from Thingiverse (you can order it here in my Shapeways shop), or in one of the nice new injection molded cartridge shells from Sean Kelly

Frank has launched a Kickstarter campaign:

FrankBuss has shared the board on OSH Park:

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Order from OSH Park

Vectrex cartridge board

NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

From on the Hackaday blog:

Real-Life Electronic Neurons

NeruroBytes is not a strange platform for neural nets. It’s physical neurons, rendered in PCBs and Molex connectors. Now, finally, it’s a Kickstarter project, and one of the more exciting educational electronic projects we’ve ever seen.

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Regular Hackaday readers should be very familiar with NeuroBytes. It began as a project for the Hackaday Prize all the way back in 2015. There, it was recognized as a finalist for the Best Product,

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Since then, the team behind NeuroBytes have received an NHS grant, they’re certified Open Source Hardware through OSHWA, and there are now enough NeuroBytes to recreate the connectome of a flatworm. It’s doubtful the team actually has enough patience to recreate the brain of even the simplest organism, but is already an impressive feat.

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The highlights of the NeuroBytes Kickstarter include seven different types of neurons for different sensory systems, kits to test the patellar reflex, and what is probably most interesting to the Hackaday crowd, a Braitenberg Vehicle chassis, meant to test the ideas set forth in Valentino Braitenberg’s book, Vehicles: Experiments in Synthetic Psychology. If that book doesn’t sound familiar, BEAM robots probably do; that’s where the idea for BEAM robots came from.

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NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board

Early this year, the world of electronics saw something amazing. The RISC-V, the first Open Source microcontroller was implemented in silicon, and we got an Arduino-derived dev board in the form of the HiFive 1. The HiFive 1 is just a bit shy of mindblowing; it’s a very fast microcontroller that’s right up there with…

via A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board — Hackaday

A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board