Bring your Open Hardware Summit badge to Hackaday Supercon

Bring your Open Hardware Summit badge to Hackaday Supercon in Pasadena this weekend!

Drew Fustini will have the badge programming jig with updated firmware featuring like the MicroPython WebREPL, accelerometer demo, and Magic 8-Ball app by Steve Pomeroy

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Drew Fustini will also have USB-to-serial adapter boards for badge to share!

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Bring your Open Hardware Summit badge to Hackaday Supercon

Hackaday Supercon is Sold Out, Join Us On the Live Streams and Chat Rooms

Over the weekend, the last available tickets to the Hackaday Superconference vanished. This will be the fullest, most exciting, hack-packed Supercon ever. We’ve always had a stunning slate of speakers. It’s hard to objectively say we will top previous years, but yes this collection of talks is an insane concentration of hardware speakers that tops…

via Supercon is Sold Out, Join Us On the Live Streams and Chat Rooms — Hackaday

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Packing a Lot Into a Little PCB: Winners of the Square Inch Project on Hackaday

It is mind-boggling when you think about the computing power that fits in the palm of your hand these days. It wasn’t long ago when air-conditioned rooms with raised floors hosted computers far less powerful that filled the whole area. Miniaturization is certainly the order of the day. Things are getting smaller every day, too. We were so impressed with the minuscule entries from the first “Square Inch Project” — a contest challenging designers to use 1 inch2 of PCB or less — that we decided bring it back with the Return of the Square Inch Project. The rules really were simple: build something with a PCB that was a square inch.

via Packing a Lot Into a Little PCB: Winners of the Square Inch Project — Hackaday

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Open Hardware Summit badge: accelerometer demo

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Want to use the KX122-1037 Accelerometer (datasheet) on the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge?

Step 1:

Make sure that R12 and R13 are populated.

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R12 and R13 are 2.2K Ohm resistors for the I2C bus.  This is needed for the accelerometer to work.  We mistakenly had DNP (do not place) on the BoM (Bill of Materials) for R12 and R13.

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Awesome people at Artisan’s Asylum makerspace helped to solder these resistors on the badges right before Open Hardware Summit! 💜✨

It is possible that some badges were not reworked.  Please email [email protected] if they are missing from your badge.

This photo shows what is will look like when R12 and R13 are missing:

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Step 2:

Download the Python file named accelerometer.py from the ohs18apps repository on GitHub:Screenshot from 2018-10-17 23-35-18.png

Start the FTP server and connect to the SSID listed on the badge:

Open your FTP client application and connect to 192.168.4.1:
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After the transfer completes, power cycle the badge by removing the batteries and reinserting.

Press the left application button (with the paintbrush and pencil icons) to enter the menu.  accelerometer.py should then be listed under Available Apps menu.  Press the down cursor until accelerometer.py is selected and then press the application button again.

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Step 3:

The KX122-1037 Accelerometer datasheet describes the 3 different axis:

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Here are examples of the X, Y and Z axis of the accelerometer for reference:

Resources:

Open Hardware Summit badge: accelerometer demo

Cool Tools: Deus Ex Autorouter

The first thing you probably asked yourself when learning how to lay out PCBs was “can’t the computer do this?” which inevitably led to the phrase “never trust the autorouter!”. Even if it hooks up a few traces the result will probably be strange to human eyes; not a design you’d want to use.

But what if the autorouter was better? What if it was so far removed from the autorouter you know that it was something else? That’s the technology that JITX provides. JITX is a company that has developed new tools that can translate a coarse textual specification of a board to KiCAD outputs autonomously.

How do you use JITX? At this point the company provides a front end to their tools; you use their website contact form to talk to a human (we assume) about what you want to make and how. But watching their demo videos (see the bottom of this post) gives a hint about how the tooling actually works. In brief; it takes a specification in a domain specific language that describes the components to use, then compiles (synthesizes?) that into KiCAD files that can be sent to fab.

via Cool Tools: Deus Ex Autorouter — Hackaday

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The Incredible Judges Of The Hackaday Prize

The last challenge of The Hackaday Prize has ended. Over the past few months, we’ve gotten a sneak peek at over a thousand amazing projects, from Open Hardware to Human Computer Interfaces. This is a contest, though, and to decide the winner, we’re tapping some of the greats in the hardware world to judge these astonishing projects.

Below are just a preview of the judges in this year’s Hackaday Prize. In the next few weeks, we’ll be sending the judging sheets out to them, tallying the results, and in just under a month we’ll be announcing the winners of the Hackaday Prize at the Hackaday Superconference in Pasadena. This is not an event to be missed — not only are we going to hear some fantastic technical talks from the hardware greats, but we’re also going to see who will walk away with the Grand Prize of $50,000.

via The Incredible Judges Of The Hackaday Prize — Hackaday

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