Tindie seller: Renier van der Lee & Vinduino

From  on the Tindie blog:

Seller Feature: Renier van der Lee & Vinduino LLC

Renier van der Lee is the father of three kids, a technology enthusiast, and a self-proclaimed “gentleman farmer,” which sounds incredibly official on its own. He is also a Tindie seller who created the award-winning Vinduino sensor, which has seen massive growth and sales both on Tindie and beyond since its inception.

Join us as we explore the history and proliferation of this unique and endlessly useful device that has a huge impact on water conservation and savings for growers.

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What is Vinduino, and How Does it Work?

Vinduino is a water-saving irrigation project for vineyards, but it has applications for all types of growers who live in drought-ridden countries. Vinduino utilizes a gypsum soil moisture sensor to accurately measure the moisture present around the roots of a plant.

It was originally designed for use in vineyards, where it can be connected to several long-range RF LoRA modules and charged by solar power. All of this is connected to the irrigation system. When the sensor detects a drop in moisture, the sprinklers turn on, and not a moment before.

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The concept won the Best Product award during the 2015 Hackaday Prize, which aims to find projects that have potential as a product people would want. Vinduino was also selected for residency in the SupplyFrame Design lab.

Renier first tested his VInduino installation on his own vineyard. Prior to the creation of Vinduino, he was spending over $4,300 each year on a vineyard management company to ensure his vines were watered.

Once he switched over to Vinduino, he didn’t need their assistance anymore. Over the course of a single year, he managed to save 430,000 gallons of water, which equates to $1,925 in cost savings. The entire installation costs $635. It offers a great return on the investment almost immediately and represents a viable solution for the ongoing water shortages in California and across the world.

Tindie seller: Renier van der Lee & Vinduino

This Is Your Last Chance To Design The Greatest Robotics Modules

It’s Friday, and that means this is your last weekend to get your project together for the Robotics Module Challenge in this year’s Hackaday Prize. We’re looking for tools for robots that blow the doors off what is commercially available.

via This Is Your Last Chance To Design The Greatest Robotics Modules — Hackaday

This Is Your Last Chance To Design The Greatest Robotics Modules

Biasing That Transistor: The Emitter Follower

We were musing upon the relative paucity of education with respect to the fundamentals of electronic circuitry with discrete semiconductors, so we thought we’d do something about it. So far we’ve taken a look at the basics of transistor biasing through the common emitter amplifier, then introduced a less common configuration, the common base amplifier. There…

via Biasing That Transistor: The Emitter Follower — Hackaday

Biasing That Transistor: The Emitter Follower

Watch the Hackaday Belgrade Conference

From  on the Hackaday blog:

Hackaday Belgrade is On: Join LiveStream and Chat!

Good morning Hackaday universe! Hackaday Belgrade 2018 has just started, and we’re knee-deep in sharing, explaining, and generally celebrating our craft. But just because you’re not here doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take part

Watch 2018 Hackaday Belgrade Conference on YouTube:

Watch the Hackaday Belgrade Conference

Hacking for Learning and Laughs: The Makers of Oakwood School

The tagline of Bay Area Maker Faire is “Inspire the Future” and there was plenty of inspiration for our future generation. We have exhibits encouraging children to get hands-on making projects to call their own, and we have many schools exhibiting their student projects telling stories of what they’ve done. 357 more words

via Hacking for Learning and Laughs: The Makers of Oakwood School — Hackaday

Hacking for Learning and Laughs: The Makers of Oakwood School

Reflowduino: Put That Toaster Oven To Good Use

From  on the Hackaday blog:

Reflowduino: Put That Toaster Oven To Good Use

There are few scenes in life more moving than the moment the solder paste melts as the component slides smoothly into place. We’re willing to bet the only reason you don’t have a reflow oven is the cost. Why wouldn’t you want one? Fortunately, the vastly cheaper DIY route has become a whole lot easier since the birth of the Reflowduino – an open source controller for reflow ovens.

This Hackaday Prize entry by [Timothy Woo] provides a super quick way to create your own reflow setup, using any cheap means of heating you have lying around. [Tim] uses a toaster oven he paid $21 for, but anything with a suitable thermal mass will do. The hardware of the Reflowduino is all open source and has been very well documented – both on the main hackaday.io page and over on the project’s GitHub.

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The board itself is built around the ATMega32u4 and sports an integrated MAX31855 thermocouple interface (for the all-important PID control), LiPo battery charging, a buzzer for alerting you when input is needed, and Bluetooth. Why Bluetooth? An Android app has been developed for easy control of the Reflowduino, and will even graph the temperature profile.

When it comes to controlling the toaster oven/miscellaneous heat source, a “sidekick” board is available, with a solid state relay hooked up to a mains plug. This makes it a breeze to setup any mains appliance for Arduino control.

 

Reflowduino: Put That Toaster Oven To Good Use

Hardware meetup tonight in SF

Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic (HDDG) is tonight at SupplyFrame in San Francisco featuring talks by Roy Jui Liang Hung, Tanya Fish (Pimoroni) and Jason Kridner (BeagleBoard.org Foundation):DdK_YJcVMAAd3oiThis HDDG should be an awesome crowd as makers from all over are in the SF Bay Area this weekend for Maker Faire.

HDDG 30: Pre-Maker Faire Roundup!

Thursday, May 17, 2018, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe / Hackaday San Francisco Office
500 3rd Street, Suite 230 San Francisco, CA

81 Hardware Developers Attending

Enjoy delicious food (that is unlikely to be pizza) and beverages while listening to fascinating technical talks by these crazy and creative engineers. Tanya Fish – Explaining Electronics to the Unitiated Roy Jui Liang Hung – Mastering Animal Mechanics with the 3D Printer Jason Kridner – Simplifying Hardware Design with System-in-Package Tech #HDDG…

Check out this Meetup →

(look for our Drew Fustini in purple)

Can’t make it?  SupplyFrame will have LIVE STREAM starting at approximately 7:00pm US PDT:

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Enjoy delicious food (that is unlikely to be pizza) and beverages while listening to fascinating technical talks by these crazy and creative engineers.

Tanya Fish – Explaining Electronics to the Unitiated
Roy Jui Liang Hung – Mastering Animal Mechanics with the 3D Printer
Jason Kridner – Simplifying Hardware Design with System-in-Package Tech

#HDDG LIVE STREAM –> http://bit.ly/2sPgORW

Tanya Fish (@tanurai) has been working at Pimoroni for the past couple of years, and is on a mission to explain how all their boards work to a wider audience. Hear her discuss the issues of explaining the “invisible magic” to complete beginners at electronics, and how the school system in the UK ill-prepares students for anything beyond building a simple circuit.

Roy is founder of Perkūnas Studio and an artist who’s passionate on tinkering. He first learned about 3Dprint in 2011, teaching himself how to master the machine. He is the most renowned 3DP expert in Taiwan. Roy will be talking about the process he used to make his incredible 3D sculptures, which he will be showing off at Maker Faire this weekend. He will even bring one of them to HDDG!

Jason Kridner is the co-founder and board member of the BeagleBoard.org foundation, and spends a lot of time defining strategy for growing open platform ecosystems. Jason will be talking about simplifying hardware design with system-in-package technology.

After the talks, there will be demos, community announcements, and socializing. If you’d like to give a 2 minute demo/ community announcement, please see the organizers when you arrive to get set up.

A community announcement includes looking for a project partner, a job, offering a project/ job, the announcement of your startup launch, your Crowdfunding pitch, etc.

We’re looking forward to seeing you Thursday, May 17th, at 6:30p!
~Jasmine, Stephen, Sophi, Matt, and Alek

Code of Conduct (https://hackaday.io/project/28093-code-of-conduct)

Hardware meetup tonight in SF