Tindie Seller Projects in The Robotics Module Challenge

From  on Tindie blog:

2018-hackaday-prize-challenges-from-poster1.jpgTindie Sellers Competing in the Hackaday Prize

The Robotics Module Challenge just wrapped up and last week we featured two of the twenty finalists who are also Tindie Sellers. Today let’s look at several other Tindie Sellers who got in the game with their own robotics module designs!

Tindie seller Citrus CNC Store is working on a low-cost automatic pick and place feeder and entered it into the robotics challenge. The pick and place machine is a valuable resource for building electronics.

The end goal here is to create a fully featured pick and place machine at a mid-range hobby 3D printer price point, with support for at least 20 automatic tape feeders and loop control of every motion related component. Check out this project on Hackaday.io.

Another Tindie seller who owns the proto-Phi Store is working on a modular design for a soft robotic gripper.

The design is for soft robotics fabrication and emphasizes the molds and subsequent actuators. The current method combines the softness of a silicone actuator and a 3D plastic exoskeleton.

Check out the project page for more details!

Supporting Our Tindie Sellers

These aren’t the only Tindie sellers participating in this year’s Hackaday Prize. Take a look at these other robotics projects from our talented makers:

Stay tuned for more updates on the finalists, and future modules in this year’s Hackaday Prize!

Tindie Seller Projects in The Robotics Module Challenge

State of KiCad this Friday

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Wayne Stambaugh from the KiCad project be joining Hack Chat on Hackaday.io this Friday to discuss upcoming plans and features for 2018:

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The State of KiCad

Friday, January 5, 2018 12:00 pm PST

  • What new features are on the roadmap for 2018?
  • What new features were developed since we chatted in January 2017?
  • Under the hood- how KiCad development works
  • How can a developer get started helping out?

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State of KiCad this Friday

ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board

We like the novel orientation of pogo pins that Wing Tang Wong used in this board design:

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ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board

Upcycles D1 Mini Wemos board to create a USB connected ESP8266 Pogo pin jig

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This is a board designed to take a WeMos D1 Mini board(with the ESP module removed) and use it as a USB interface with built-in reset/flash functionality for bare ESP8266 modules similar to the ESP-12 units.

The design files are available on GitHub:

github ESP8266 Programming D1 Mini Pogo Jig V1

ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board

Turn cheap USB soldering irons in to tweezers

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Turn cheap USB soldering irons in to tweezers — Hackaday

This is 2016, and almost every hacker dabbles with SMD parts now, unlike back in the day. This means investing in at least some specialized tools and equipment to make the job easier. One handy tool is the SMD soldering tweezers – useful not only for manual soldering of parts, but also for de-soldering them…

Turn cheap USB soldering irons in to tweezers

Vinduino: Save 25% Of Water Needed For Irrigation

 

wrote on the Tindie blog:

 

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Vinduino – Save 25% Of Water Needed For Irrigation

Vinduino is one of those projects that set out to solve a really big problem which straight away makes it interesting. Reinier van der Lee wanted to use the least amount of water possible for irrigation in his southern California vineyard.

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Hence the Vinduino project was made to be a relatively low cost system to help save on water use. It is also solar powered, further reducing its impact on the environment.

Vinduino: Save 25% Of Water Needed For Irrigation

OpenFixture Takes the Pain Out of Pogo Pins

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Hackaday reports:

OpenFixture Takes the Pain Out of Pogo Pins

[Elliot] wrote in with his OpenFixture model for OpenSCAD. It’s awesome because it takes a small problem, that nonetheless could consume an entire day, and solves it neatly. And that problem is making jigs to test assembled electrical products: a PCB test fixture.

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In the PCB design software, you simply note down the locations of the test points and feed these into the OpenSCAD model.  [Elliot] shows you exactly how to do it using KiCAD. There are a few more parameters of the model that you can tweak to match your particulars, but you should have a DXF outline for a test jig in short order. Cut that out, assemble, and test.

 

OpenFixture Takes the Pain Out of Pogo Pins