Cyborg Ring

From zakqwy on Hackaday.io:

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Cyborg Ring

cordwood + smt + jewelry + blinkies + zinc-air batteries

This project evolved from Splinter, the SMT cordwood project I did last summer/fall. The ring is powered by tiny size 10 hearing aide batteries which should give 4-6 weeks of intermittent use, once I come up with a design that doesn’t break after a few days of wear and update the firmware to put the ATtinyx5 to sleep. The first rev (labelled ‘blink-ring’) used deep red 650nm LEDs. Searching for particular component lengths gave me an excuse to use strange 0508 resistors. And somehow, this is my first Charlieplexing project. Yaay novelty soldering!
Cyborg Ring

Lumen Electronic Jewelry

We love PCBs, so we were excited to see this beautiful circuitry from Lumen Electronic Jewelry:

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Fashion Gets Geeky

Lumen is the creation of Robin and Marty Lawson in Madison, Wisconsin:

We’re life-long tinkerers, siblings, and fourth generation mechanical engineers.

They’ve designed soldering kits for all levels: beginner, intermediate, and advanced surface mount soldering.  This heart is an example of an intermediate kit:

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Lumen also makes beautiful fully-assembled LED jewelry:

Solar powered twinkling LED jewelry. No batteries, hours of blinky.

We particularly like this twinkling fiberglass cephalopod:

Blinky Octopus Necklace

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Each octopus has 16 amber LED lights throughout the arms connected to 12 tiny solar cells. So your necklace will charge and blink all on its own, no batteries required.

Robin tells me that they use Free PCB for layout:

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Robin informed me that they laser their own stencils out of thin mylar sheets at their local Makerspace, Sector 67:

Robin explains that afterwards they clean the boards in an orange -based degreaser then seal in a ResinLab epoxy:
It is expensive but has a long working life, excellent hardness and optical clarity, as well as UV resistance to yellowing.
P.S. Here’s an insightful talk that Robin gave at TEDxMadison last year:
Lumen Electronic Jewelry