Hardware Happy Hour Chicago tonight, KiCon tomorrow!

Exciting times for people in Chicago that like hardware!

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Tonight, Thursday, April 25th is Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago at Ballast Point!  It’s an informal hardware show ‘n tell that is a lot of fun:

April 3H Chicago Meetup (KiCon eve!)

Thursday, Apr 25, 2019, 7:00 PM

Ballast Point Brewing Chicago
212 N Green St Chicago, il

38 Members Attending

Please bring your latest project with you! Anything you’re working on, electrical, mechanical or software works! We want to see the stuff that you’re interested in!

Check out this Meetup →

And KiCon 2019 begins tomorrow!  Come learn more about designing circuit boards with KiCad.

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There is also a party at Chicago hackerspace Pumping Station: One on Friday night and then a Bring-A-Hack party with Hackaday on Saturday night.

Look for our Drew Fustini (@pdp7) in purple at all the above events!

Hardware Happy Hour Chicago tonight, KiCon tomorrow!

KiCad 5.1.0 Release

The KiCad project has released a new version:

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KiCad 5.1.0 Release

The KiCad project is proud to announce the release of version 5.1.0. This is the first ever minor version release of KiCad and was developed primarily to resolve compatibility issues with Linux GTK3 and long awaited support for python3.

In addition to the primary focus, there have been many important changes that make this release a substantial improvement over the 5.0 series and a worthwhile upgrade for users on all platforms. Included in the improvements are:

  • Improved 3D model library path configuration.
  • Cairo canvas is now used for printing support on all platforms.
  • Schematic and symbol library editors now use the modern canvases for rendering.
  • Symbol pin table is now editable.
  • Pcbnew scripting support for Python 3 has been added.
  • Snapping for graphical object drawing in board and footprint editors.
  • Significant user interface improvements.
  • Major dialog box improvements.
  • Both the footprint and symbol library editors now share the same user interface paradigm with a library tree view pane.
  • Symbol, footprint, and 3D model library improvements.
  • Documentation and translation improvements.
  • Less pain for Linux package maintainers, now all features should be easy to support.
KiCad 5.1.0 Release

Hackaday Supercon – Chris Gammell : Improve Your Circuit Toolbox in KiCad

Chris Gammell at Hackaday Supercon:

Simple designs will save your next product if you know which circuits to piece together. Utility circuits practical for everyday electronics. Hackaday Superconference: The greatest gathering of hardware hackers, builders, engineers and enthusiasts on the planet returns. Streaming Live talks from our ‘Main Stage’ in Pasadena, CA. Visit for full list of talks and workshops : https://hackaday.io/superconference/

Hackaday Supercon – Chris Gammell : Improve Your Circuit Toolbox in KiCad

Creating KiCad Parts From A PDF Automagically

 

For anyone out there who has ever struggled finding a part for Eagle or KiCad, there are some who would say you’re doing it wrong. You’re supposed to make your own parts if you can’t find them in the libraries you already have. This is really the only way; PCB design tools are tools, and so the story goes you’ll never be a master unless you can make your own parts.

That said, making schematic parts and footprints is a pain, and if there’s a tool to automate the process, we’d be happy to use it. That’s exactly what uConfig does. It automatically extracts pinout information from a PDF datasheet and turns it into a schematic symbol.

via Creating KiCad Parts From A PDF Automagically — Hackaday

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Visual Schematic Diffs in KiCAD Help Find Changes

When writing software a key part of the development workflow is looking at changes between files. With version control systems this process can get pretty advanced, letting you see changes between arbitrary files and slices in time. Tooling exists to do this visually in the world of EDA tools but it hasn’t really trickled all the way down to the free hobbyist level yet. But thanks to open and well understood file formats [jean-noël] has written plotgitsch to do it for KiCAD.

via Visual Schematic Diffs in KiCAD Help Find Changes — Hackaday

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Advanced Techniques For Using Git With KiCAD

For most developers “distributed version control” probably means git. But by itself git doesn’t work very well with binary files such as images, zip files and the like because git doesn’t know how to make sense of the structure of an arbitrary blobs of bytes. So when trying to figure out how to track changes in design files created by most EDA tools git doesn’t get the nod and designers can be trapped in SVN hell. It turns out though KiCAD’s design files may not have obvious extensions like .txt, they are fundamentally text files (you might know that if you’ve ever tried to work around some of KiCAD’s limitations). And with a few tweaks from [jean-noël]’s guideyou’ll be diffing and merging your .pro’s and .sch’s with aplomb.

via Advanced Techniques For Using Git With KiCAD — Hackaday

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Open Hardware Summit 2018 badge

OSH Park is producing electronic conference badges for the 2018 Open Hardware Summit.  The hardware has been designed Alex Camilo, based on concepts from the ESP trINKet by Mike Rankin.  The badge features an ESP32 microcontroller and a 2.13″ E-Paper display.

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OSH Park shared project for the Rev 3 by Alex Camilo :

https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/8yeLK5gd

Order from OSH Park

a

b

We expect this to be the final revision.

Timeline:

It is ordered on Super Swift today and should be validated next weekend.  This will allow us to order the full quantity PCB panels in August 13th.  Assembly is estimated to be 10 business days from the day when all components and PCBs are received.

Rev 2 photos:

And for those interested, here is a link to a gallery:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/UhCUX7eRN38tAhsF7

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Terminal output on Rev 2 prototypes:

The Rev 2 prototypes have NodeMCU boards soldered on to the back to serve as a USB to serial adapter.

One of the Rev 2 prototype boards that Alex sent me has the default e-paper demo:

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The other has MicroPython installed! 🙂

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Resources for the 2018 Open Hardware Summit badge:

Open Hardware Summit 2018 badge