SF Hardware Startup meetup on Wednesday

The SF Hardware Startup Meetup is this Wednesday evening in San Francisco:

Screenshot from 2018-04-17 00-44-01.png

Hardware Studio | Kickstarter, Avnet, & Dragon Innovation

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018, 7:00 PM

Bolt
724 Brannan St. San Francisco, ca

259 Startup-Hardwarians Attending

Hey Hardwarians! Ready for another SF Hardware Startup Meetup!? This time around we’re sponsored by the folks fueling Hardware Studio. Hardware Studio is a new initiative from Kickstarter, Avnet, and Dragon Innovation, providing resources and support for independent hardware creators. The goal of the initiative is to help teams be better prepared f…

Check out this Meetup →

 Look for our Drew Fustini in purple!

SF Hardware Startup meetup on Wednesday

Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

Miasma is a pure analog oscillator module based on the Curtis CEM3340 chips used in legendary ’80s synths, with new & innovative signal patching:Screenshot from 2018-02-17 12-51-02.png

Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

We designed the Miasma Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) to bring that classic ’80s synthesizer sound back to Eurorack modular systems. We just couldn’t find any currently available oscillators with the sound textures and capabilities that we wanted, so we had to design our own; and now you get to own one as well.  

There are many unique capabilities built into Miasma that you won’t find in any other oscillator module, like the built-in patching and cross modulation structures that make Miasma so flexible in your rack. However, it’s all about the sound – so let’s start with some Miasma audio samples, before we go into the technical details of how we make that sound possible (best listening with Headphones!)

0a635b2bc46c8cd97872649470a55194_original

Miasma: Classic Dual Voice Eurorack Synthesizer Module

Vectrex cartridge board

From Frank Buss on hackaday.io:

9109901511267007275

Vectrex cartridge

This is my first version of a PCB for building a Vectrex cartridge. I used this for my Kickstarter project for the Bloxorz game. The PCB was manufactured by @oshpark , you can order your board here.

1073231511269047209

It fits in this 3D printed case from Thingiverse (you can order it here in my Shapeways shop), or in one of the nice new injection molded cartridge shells from Sean Kelly

Frank has launched a Kickstarter campaign:

FrankBuss has shared the board on OSH Park:

vectrex.brd

0323f5d9aaa6f3712fe6de2dc0acea95

Order from OSH Park

Vectrex cartridge board

NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

From on the Hackaday blog:

Real-Life Electronic Neurons

NeruroBytes is not a strange platform for neural nets. It’s physical neurons, rendered in PCBs and Molex connectors. Now, finally, it’s a Kickstarter project, and one of the more exciting educational electronic projects we’ve ever seen.

Screenshot from 2017-11-19 22-07-41.png

Regular Hackaday readers should be very familiar with NeuroBytes. It began as a project for the Hackaday Prize all the way back in 2015. There, it was recognized as a finalist for the Best Product,

7423c3f872bda7164e46ca8324d93e87_original

Since then, the team behind NeuroBytes have received an NHS grant, they’re certified Open Source Hardware through OSHWA, and there are now enough NeuroBytes to recreate the connectome of a flatworm. It’s doubtful the team actually has enough patience to recreate the brain of even the simplest organism, but is already an impressive feat.

a17325c3614418883f95a537b10adc44_original.png

The highlights of the NeuroBytes Kickstarter include seven different types of neurons for different sensory systems, kits to test the patellar reflex, and what is probably most interesting to the Hackaday crowd, a Braitenberg Vehicle chassis, meant to test the ideas set forth in Valentino Braitenberg’s book, Vehicles: Experiments in Synthetic Psychology. If that book doesn’t sound familiar, BEAM robots probably do; that’s where the idea for BEAM robots came from.

8de00e81d3d907dd127bfcafaf0d3148_original

NeuroBytes: Electronic Neuron Simulators

Hackaday NYC Meetup on Thursday

This is a busy, busy week for Tindie and Hackaday. We’re going to New York, and we have a ton of events planned. First up is the monthly Hackaday meetup. This time, we’re teaming up with Kickstarter for a pre-Maker Faire Meetup. We’ll be hosting this at Kickstarter’s HQ, and already we have an impressive…

via A Slew Of NYC Meetups With Tindie And Hackaday This Week — Hackaday

Hackaday NYC + Kickstarter: Assistive Tech, Maker Faire, and more

Thursday, Sep 21, 2017, 6:30 PM

Location details are available to members only.

109 Makers Attending

Join us on Thursday, September 21st as Hackaday MakeIt NYC teams up with Kickstarter for a pre-Maker Faire Meetup! We’ll feature awesome talks and demos with a special spotlight on Assistive Technologies. Stay tuned for more details!CURRENTLY CONFIRMED:Anita Perr & R. Luke Dubois  (The NYU Ability Project)Anita Perr, PhD, ATP, FAOTA, is a Clini…

Check out this Meetup →

(Drew Fustini will be there, too)

Hackaday NYC Meetup on Thursday

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

slack-imgs.com.jpeg

Crazy Circuits: Unique STEM Projects Delivered Monthly

Create fun STEM and STEAM electronics projects with parts delivered to your door.

93abf5b462750815444a32d2ba887a51_original

Crazy Circuits is a non-soldering electronic learning platform that allows people to create circuits from almost any material they can imagine. Crazy Circuits are designed to pop onto LEGO™ bricks, enabling your LEGO™ creations to shine, move, and make noise. Use Crazy Circuits to construct paper crafts with conductive tape, use conductive thread for sewing, and create art with conductive inks and paints. You can even program sketches with Arduino compatible Crazy Circuits boards. No matter what you want to build, Crazy Circuits brings it all together.

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Arduino-programmable ARM Cortex M4F Boards

Kris Winer of Pesky Products designed these easy-to-program, high-performance and low-power dev boards:

screenshot-at-2016-12-19-18-21-29
Arduino-programmable Cortex M4F Development Boards

Program an STM32L4 Cortex M4F with the Arduino IDE via USB

07d323cc59a7037a2ce3db223c0fdf7d_original-jpg

Technical specifications of the Butterfly and Ladybug STM32L4 dev boards:

  • Microcontroller: STM32L4 ARM Cortex M4F
  • Clock speed: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 48, 64, 80 MHz
  • Operating voltage: 3.3V
  •  I/O pin limits: most pins 5.0 V tolerant, 20 mA
  • Digital I/O pins: 22, with 11 PWM (Butterfly), 13, with 10 PWM (Ladybug)
  • Analog input pins: 6 (Butterfly), 5 (Ladybug), 12-bit ADC channels
  • Analog output pins: 2 12-bit DAC
  • RTC: 1 ppm accuracy
  • Flash memory: 256 KB
  • SRAM: 64 KB
  • Voltage regulator: 3.3-5.5V input / 3.3V, 150 mA output

New Butterfly and Ladybug add-on boards

57b2768c5f3f65c565cb477bb7899e9a_original

To the left is an MPU9250 accel/gyro/magnetometer motion sensor and the BME280 pressure/humidity/temperature sensor

To the right is an ESP8266 wifi-enabled add-on board for Butterfly

Ladybug environmental data logger

99dd694fbdf0d16502e4c95b29031171_original.jpg

Reading the BME280 and VEML6040 sensors at 0.5 Hz and outputting pressure, temperature, humidity, altitude, RGB light intensity and RTC time and date to the Sharp memory display

Simple designs make hardware customization easy

c2e3de0f40183339cd72afecdd487e5a_original

Flight Controller:

STM32L432 receives quaternions from the EM7180, which itself is master to the motion and pressure sensors, GNSS data from the CAM M8Q, then processes and packages the data and sends it to the ESP8285 via UART bridge for transmission to a hand-held controller

9627aadfc8bbc07331533d6a13b697b3_original

Industrial Diagnostics:

uses an STM32L433 as master to several slave sensors to detect and process signals from industrial equipment and report to a remote server via blue tooth

Arduino-programmable ARM Cortex M4F Boards