Finishing the IN-9/IN-13 Nixie Tube Driver for the Raspberry Pi (Part 2)

Mark Smith writes on the Surf ‘n Circuits blog about a Nixie Tube project:

Finishing the IN-9/IN-13 Nixie Tube Driver for the Raspberry Pi (Part 2)

Rarely during product development do you get it correct on the first design iteration. Something always goes wrong or just isn’t perfect. However, like trying for a hole-in-one on a par 3, you always try for perfection but expect to need a few extra strokes. So, while I almost hit a hole in one in the first version of the Nixie Tube HAT (Part 1), a few improvements were required. In this blog, I describe the few improvements found from Part 1 and complete the design to reach stage 6 of the surfncircuits defined development flow. As with the other projects in the blog, the complete design files in Kicad, schematics, layout, BOM, are available at GitHub for use in your own projects. You can build it yourself and the PCB can also be ordered directly from Oshpark.

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Pocket Pi project by Facelesstech

From the Facelesstech blog:

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Pocket Pi

So if you have been following my blog lately you may have noticed me rambling on about trying to get a Xbox 360 chat pad and an ps3 keypad working with a raspberry pi to make a portable terminal. I have finally finished my quest so join me below to see how I did it

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Hardware

  • Raspberry pi zero w
  • 3.5″ waveshare clone
  • Rii Mini 518 Bluetooth keyboard
  • Bluetooth dongle
  • Power bank board
  • 2600mAh lipo battery
  • DIY USB hub
  • DIY interface PCB for screen
  • Acrylic
  • Various stand-offs

Raspberry pi zero w a 3.5″ screen a power bank board and a bluetooth keyboard is that makes up this pocket terminal.

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Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) Nixie Tube Clock

From Mark Smith on the Surf ‘n Circuits blog:

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What is an ETA Nixie Tube Clock and How Do You Build One?

Adding IOT to the Nixie Tube Clock. A clock that provides the estimated time of arrival for up to ten destinations

The ETA Nixie clock is programmed to display the normal time and up to ten different ETA times that are easy to identify and visually stimulating. The current time is displayed for 5 seconds (i.e. 8:41:38 AM), then up to ten different ETA destinations are displayed for three seconds each before the cycle is repeated. The current time displays all six digits including seconds. The ETA locations are numbered and display hours and minutes without seconds helping to distinguish between them.  In our house, the ETA to work is ETA number 1 (i.e. 9:07 AM) and the ETA to school is ETA number 2 (i.e. 8:58 AM). Lots of other options are possible with custom programming of the Raspberry Pi to meet your ETA requirements.

surfncircuits has shared the board on OSH Park:

An Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) Nixie Tube Clock Rev 2.

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Order from OSH Park

Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) Nixie Tube Clock

PDX Raspberry Pi and Arduino Meetup

There is a new PDX Raspberry Pi and Arduino meetup organized by hosted by Mitch Bayersdorfer coming to Portland on Saturday, April 7th:

Initial Meeting – Show and tell, build and chat.

Saturday, Apr 7, 2018, 1:00 PM

No location yet.

10 Open Source HW Enthusiasts Attending

• What we’ll do Part social and part build time, this meet-up is for those • What to bring Computer. Raspberry Pi and/or Arduinos if you have them. Projects that you want to share. Items for the “parts luck” swap bin. • Important to know The shop where this is held only has space heaters – so please dress warmly on colder days. On very cold days, w…

Check out this Meetup →

• What we’ll do:

Part social and part build time, this meet-up is for those

• What to bring

Computer. Raspberry Pi and/or Arduinos if you have them. Projects that you want to share. Items for the “parts luck” swap bin.

• Important to know

The shop where this is held only has space heaters – so please dress warmly on colder days. On very cold days, we will forego building and have a social in a heated space, if we can’t find an alternative spot.

PDX Raspberry Pi and Arduino Meetup

Interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to Commodore 64

Leif Bloomquist has designed a board to interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to the Commodore 64 through the User Port.

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Raspberry Pi Zero W / Commodore 64 Interface Board

Project goals:

1. Get a Linux shell prompt on your C64 through the Pi Zero’s Console Pins.

2. Use the Pi Zero as a virtual Floppy Disk Drive through raspbiec (https://github.com/Flogistoni/raspbiec) (another option is ninepin, https://github.com/FozzTexx/ninepin)

3. Allow your C64 to access the Internet, USB, etc. through the Pi Zero. ssh!

4. Provide Composite Video out from the Pi Zero that is usable directly on a Commodore monitor.

5. (Stretch Goal #1) If possible – use your C64’s keyboard as the keyboard on the Pi Zero (through the serial port). Maybe through softwedge? (https://github.com/theatrus/softwedge)

6. (Stretch Goal #2) Add PWM audio output (along the lines of https://learn.adafruit.com/introducing-the-raspberry-pi-zero/audio-outputs)

 

  • 1 × Commodore 64
  • 1 × Raspberry Pi Zero W
  • 1 × 75HC245 For 5V / 3.3V translation
  • 1 × Custom board To be designed.

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Interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to Commodore 64