“Produce your own physical chips. For free. In the Open.”

Big news today from Tim Ansell of Google along with eFabless and Skywater Foundry.  FOSSi Foundation has a new post with the details:

Produce your own physical chips. For free. In the Open.

Today, in a FOSSi Dial-Up talk, Tim Ansell of Google announced SkyWater PDK, the first manufacturable, open source process design kit. What differentiates this PDK from previous attempts is the fact that it is manufacturable: with this PDK, you can actually produce chips with the SkyWater foundry in the 130nm node.

That leaves you as chip designer only with one road block: money. Manufacturing chips is expensive – even for more than a decade old nodes like the 130nm node, you need to spend at least a couple thousand dollars.

You know what? Don’t worry – Google and efabless have got you covered! They are providing completely free of cost chip manufacturing runs: one in November this year, and multiple more in 2021. All open source chip designs qualify, no further strings attached!

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“Produce your own physical chips. For free. In the Open.”

Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

I attended the 36th Chaos Communication Congress (36c3) during the last
week of 2019 in Leipzig, Germany.  It was an amazing event and Hackaday has good coverage.  All the talks are available online including my talk:

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Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

Want to run Linux on open hardware? This talk will explore Open Source Hardware projects capable of that task, and explore how RISC-V and free software FPGA projects can be leveraged to create libre systems.

The video is also available on YouTube:

My slides are on SlideShare:

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The slides are also available as a PDF on GitHub.

Linux on Open Source Hardware with Open Source chip design

The first Adafruit Show ‘n Tell of 2020

Joining Adafruit Show ‘n Tell with Helen Leigh was a fun way to start 2020!

Helen embroidered the CircuitPython-powered Serpente board from Arturo at Chaos Communication Congress (36c3):

I showed Linux running on a RISC-V core in the ECP5 FPGA on the Hackaday Supercon badge:

I gave a shout-out to Greg Davill who got Linux booting the OrangeCrab while at 36c3:

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Greg’s open hardware OrangeCrab board features the ECP5 FPGA in an Adafruit Feather form factor and is capable of running a RISC-V “soft” core using LiteX.

Find out more about Linux on RISC-V using open source FPGA toolchains in the slides from my 36c3 talk

The first Adafruit Show ‘n Tell of 2020

Latch-Up 2020

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The next Latch-Up Conference will be in Cambridge, MA (USA) on April 11th-12th, 2020.
 
The event is organized by the Free and Open Source Silicon (FOSSi) Foundation and is a weekend of presentations and networking for the open source digital design community, much like ORConf in Europe.
Follow @LatchUpConf on Twitter for updates.

Videos of the 2019 conference are in the Latch-Up 2019 playlist on the FOSSi Foundation’s YouTube channel:

Latch-Up 2020

A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board

Early this year, the world of electronics saw something amazing. The RISC-V, the first Open Source microcontroller was implemented in silicon, and we got an Arduino-derived dev board in the form of the HiFive 1. The HiFive 1 is just a bit shy of mindblowing; it’s a very fast microcontroller that’s right up there with…

via A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board — Hackaday

A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board

LoFive RISC-V board now on GroupGets

LoFive RISC-V dev board designed by Michael Welling with KiCad is now on GroupGets:

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LoFive is a small board based on the SiFive Freedom E310 open source SoC

LoFive_LED

Specifications

  • MCU – SiFive Freedom E310 (FE310) 32-bit RV32IMAC processor @ up to 320+ MHz (1.61 DMIPS/MHz)
  • Storage – 128-Mbit SPI flash (ISSI IS25LP128)
  • Expansion – 2x 14-pin headers with JTAG, GPIO, PWM, SPI, UART, 5V, 3.3V and GND
  • Misc – 1x reset button, 16 MHz crystal
  • Power Supply – 5V via pin 1 on header; Operating Voltage: 3.3 V and 1.8 V
  • Dimensions – 38 x 18 mm (estimated)
  • License – CERN Open Hardware Licence v1.2

LoFive-Schematics-600px

The design files are available on GitHub:

mwelling/lofive

LoFive RISC-V board now on GroupGets

OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

The Free and Open Source Silicon (FOSSi) Foundation fosters open source ​ semiconductor design​ and we’re proud to have become a sponsor!  Julius Baxter writes on the FOSSi Foundation blog:fossi_logo_large

OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

We are pleased to announce that OSH Park, the purveyors of perfect purple PCBs, have become sponsors of the FOSSi Foundation’s activities. We are very grateful for their support and would like to recognize this by listing them on our Sponsors page at the Bronze tier.

We are actively looking for sponsors for the Foundation, if you’re interested in learning more about our activities and why we are looking for sponsorship, then please visit our sponsorship page and for more, see our detailed sponsorship proposal document.

More information on the FOSSi Foundation:

Inspired by the success of open source software, the Foundation will help bring about IP and tools of comparable quality to proprietary offerings, and which are developed according to an open source model by a highly collaborative and inclusive community. The FOSSi Foundation will address the issues the field currently faces; fragmentation, legal uncertainty, design quality, and high barriers to entry.

FOSSi has launched LibreCores:

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gateway to free and open source digital designs and other components that you can use and re-use in your digital designs.

FOSSi also organizes the ORConf:

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We’re pleased to announce that ORConf 2017 will be held between September 8th and September 10th in Hebden Bridge in the UK.

Past talks are on the FOSSi Foundation’s YouTube channel such as this introduction from last year (jump to 1:59):

OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

OnChip Open-V Arduino Compatibility

OnChip has posted a Crowd Supply update on their plans for Arduino compatibility:

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Open-V Arduino Compatibility

Arduino compatibility can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people, so we’ll try to be as concrete and specific as possible. For the Open-V, Arduino development tools, and interoperating on a hardware level with existing Arduino shields.

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We’ve updated our live, web-streamed demos to include an Arduino mode in addition to the assembler and C modes we already have. You might also notice the relatively new Blockly modes and a refined layout of the demo page. Go write some code and see the results live streamed!

Screenshot at 2017-02-12 20-18-49.png

OnChip Open-V Arduino Compatibility

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the…

via Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web — Hackaday

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web