Visual Schematic Diffs in KiCAD Help Find Changes

When writing software a key part of the development workflow is looking at changes between files. With version control systems this process can get pretty advanced, letting you see changes between arbitrary files and slices in time. Tooling exists to do this visually in the world of EDA tools but it hasn’t really trickled all the way down to the free hobbyist level yet. But thanks to open and well understood file formats [jean-noël] has written plotgitsch to do it for KiCAD.

via Visual Schematic Diffs in KiCAD Help Find Changes — Hackaday

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Advanced Techniques For Using Git With KiCAD

For most developers “distributed version control” probably means git. But by itself git doesn’t work very well with binary files such as images, zip files and the like because git doesn’t know how to make sense of the structure of an arbitrary blobs of bytes. So when trying to figure out how to track changes in design files created by most EDA tools git doesn’t get the nod and designers can be trapped in SVN hell. It turns out though KiCAD’s design files may not have obvious extensions like .txt, they are fundamentally text files (you might know that if you’ve ever tried to work around some of KiCAD’s limitations). And with a few tweaks from [jean-noël]’s guideyou’ll be diffing and merging your .pro’s and .sch’s with aplomb.

via Advanced Techniques For Using Git With KiCAD — Hackaday

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PocketBeagle workshop this Friday at Maker Faire New York

Register for PocketBeagle coding workshop this Friday with Jason Kridner  of BeagleBoard.org at Maker Faire New York:

Getting Started with PocketBeagle® from BeagleBoard.org® Hands-On Coding Workshop

via PocketBeagle workshop this Friday at Maker Faire New York — BeagleBoard.org Blog

 

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Pocket Pi project by Facelesstech

From the Facelesstech blog:

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Pocket Pi

So if you have been following my blog lately you may have noticed me rambling on about trying to get a Xbox 360 chat pad and an ps3 keypad working with a raspberry pi to make a portable terminal. I have finally finished my quest so join me below to see how I did it

img_20180829_135606 (1)

Hardware

  • Raspberry pi zero w
  • 3.5″ waveshare clone
  • Rii Mini 518 Bluetooth keyboard
  • Bluetooth dongle
  • Power bank board
  • 2600mAh lipo battery
  • DIY USB hub
  • DIY interface PCB for screen
  • Acrylic
  • Various stand-offs

Raspberry pi zero w a 3.5″ screen a power bank board and a bluetooth keyboard is that makes up this pocket terminal.

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