Ladder board for simple Automation

chmod775 designed this compact, standalone board to be programmed with a simple visual language:270681483106954815.jpg

Focus

Focus born with the purpose of making a prototype board that simplify every aspect of programming.

Spent the last hour writing down the main concept of the Visual Programming Language for the Focus!  It’s just a simple sketch, but I wanted to share it with you the main reason why I’m building it.

Ladder board for simple Automation

eMMC to SD Card Adapter

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From the Intelligent Toasters blog:

Retro CPC Dongle – Part 18

I’ve been working on, replacing the NAND raw flash with an eMMC chip on the CPC2.0 board.

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I wrote about raw flash and the challenges of writing a flash translation later in part 16 of this series. After some research, I concluded that the eMMC interface looked exactly like the much more common SDCard interface, albeit that the interface can be run with an 8-bit width. SDCards are limited to 4 bits by the physical pin count. Taking a gamble I created a board to test this new eMMC chip. I created a fake SDCard!

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This fake card allowed me to check very quickly if my assumptions were correct both at a hardware and a firmware level. I wanted to be sure that it was possible to interface the eMMC via 4 bits, rather than the full 8 bits and be sure the firmware instructions were the same between these two technologies.

Intelligent-Toasters has shared the board on OSH Park:

emmc.zip

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Order from OSH Park

eMMC to SD Card Adapter

Vertically Mounted Arduino-Compatible Board

Clovis Fritzen designed this Arduino-compatible, vertically-mountable board that exclusively uses through-hole components:

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Vertically mounted Arduino for Breadboard

I personally love the concept of electronic boards connected in “slots” (vertically attached to a horizontal board), like most industrial-grade PLC’s or even our desktop’s expansion cards (video, sound memory): it saves a lot of space and adds more functions to the system, all at once!

 

The PCB is for sale on Tindie:

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Vertically mountable Arduino – PCB only

This is an Arduno-Nano compatible controller that can be vertically mounted to bredboards and boards

 

Vertically Mounted Arduino-Compatible Board

Snowbot

Dan Hienzsch a holiday project to build a little Snowbot with an adjustable speed larson scanner for an eye:

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Snowbot Ornament Project

When I started thinking of this project, I wanted to make something that included a bit of the basics and something more advanced. It had to be battery powered, and most importantly, I wanted to make sure it went against the grain of everything needing a microcontroller. Thus Snowbot was born.

Photos from the Hackaday.io project:

RheingoldHeavy has shared the board on OSH Park:

Snowbot_2015_Rev1

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Order from OSH Park

Snowbot

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE

Ted Yapo is designing a display for his  LED Oscilloscope Mk. II and decided to automate the process:

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16×32 Display Design

I painstakingly drew the schematic for 512 LEDs in this display, then endured the drudgery of laying out the board. The whole process took about 45 seconds. Yes, I wrote a few Eagle User Language Programs (ULPs) (elapsed time after the scripts were written and debugged). The previous time I wrote one was last century to lay out a circular LED clock face. I figured it was about time I regained those skills.

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The EAGLE ULPs are on GitHub:

led-matrix-generator

 Eagle scripts for LED matrix display generation

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE

SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breakout Board

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I designed this simple breakout board in KiCad to make it easier to put a rotary encoder on a breadboard.   The KiCad symbol and footprint for the SparkFun rotary encoder was created by mcous on GitHub.  I used an updated version with corrected pin numbering.

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Bill of Materials:

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The design files are available on GitHub:

Screenshot at 2017-02-14 20-58-40.png pdp7/rotary-encoder-breakout

The board is shared on OSH Park:

SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breadboard Adapter

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Order from OSH Park

SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breakout Board

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle

Bryan Cockfield of Hackaday writes:

Brake Light Blinker Does It with Three Fives

Sometimes you use a Raspberry Pi when you really could have gotten by with an Arudino. Sometimes you use an Arduino when maybe an ATtiny45 would have been better. And sometimes, like [Bill]’s motorcycle tail light project, you use exactly the right tool for the job: a 555 timer.

boardsMore details on William F. Dudley’s project page:

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle

The 555 is a clever chip; not only will it supply the oscillator for the flashing effect, it has a reset pin that can be used to force the output to a known state (low) when (other circuitry tells it that) it’s time to stop flashing. Thus the brake light will be steady “on” after a few flashes every time the brake is applied.

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The 555 is happy to run directly off the nominal 12 volt vehicle electrical system, so no voltage regulator is needed. The 555 is almost immune to electrical system noise, so no worries about your Arduino code going off into the weeds if there’s a spike from the electrical system.

 

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle