Stepper Driver Module with Swappable Heatsinks

At first glance, [Dean Gouramanis]’s stepper driver module for 3D printers looks like just another RAMPS-compatible stepper board. Except, what could that gold-plated copper peg sticking out of the PCB possibly be? That would be [Dean]’s PowerPeg Thermal Management System that he built and entered in the Hackaday Prize competition for 2015, where it rocked…

via Stepper Driver Module with Swappable Heatsinks — Hackaday

Stepper Driver Module with Swappable Heatsinks

Hackaday: A Fidget Spinner We Can Love

 

We’ve been frankly mystified at the popularity of fidget spinners. After all, we can flip an ink pen around just fine. However, [MakersBox] just sold us on what he calls the geek spinner. The fact that the spinner is actually a PCB and has parts on it, would probably have been cool enough. However, the…

via Finally, A Fidget Spinner We Can Love — Hackaday

Hackaday: A Fidget Spinner We Can Love

Prototyping, Making A Board For, And Coding An ARM Neural Net Robot

[Sean Hodgins]’s calls his three-part video series an Arduino Neural Network Robot but we’d rather call it an enjoyable series on prototyping, designing a board with surface mount parts, assembling it, and oh yeah, putting a neural network on it, all the while offering plenty of useful tips. In part one, prototype and design, he starts…

via Prototyping, Making A Board For, And Coding An ARM Neural Net Robot — Hackaday

Prototyping, Making A Board For, And Coding An ARM Neural Net Robot

An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner

 

Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware. The design aims to make extended duration missions a possibility by using very little power to move the…

via An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner — Hackaday

An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner

Hardware Happy Hour Chicago on 11/28

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The next Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago will be this Tuesday, November 28th:

November Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago

Tuesday, Nov 28, 2017, 6:00 PM

Haymarket
737 W Randolph St Chicago, IL

25 Members Attending

This group is based upon the idea that you are interested in hanging out and discussing hardware. Please bring a piece of hardware to show off or talk about. Are you interested in hardware, but you haven’t built anything yet? Show off software you have built! Or come prepared to talk about the projects you want to build. There are no organized talk…

Check out this Meetup →

Hope to see you there!

 

Hardware Happy Hour Chicago on 11/28

Interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to Commodore 64

Leif Bloomquist has designed a board to interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to the Commodore 64 through the User Port.

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Raspberry Pi Zero W / Commodore 64 Interface Board

Project goals:

1. Get a Linux shell prompt on your C64 through the Pi Zero’s Console Pins.

2. Use the Pi Zero as a virtual Floppy Disk Drive through raspbiec (https://github.com/Flogistoni/raspbiec) (another option is ninepin, https://github.com/FozzTexx/ninepin)

3. Allow your C64 to access the Internet, USB, etc. through the Pi Zero. ssh!

4. Provide Composite Video out from the Pi Zero that is usable directly on a Commodore monitor.

5. (Stretch Goal #1) If possible – use your C64’s keyboard as the keyboard on the Pi Zero (through the serial port). Maybe through softwedge? (https://github.com/theatrus/softwedge)

6. (Stretch Goal #2) Add PWM audio output (along the lines of https://learn.adafruit.com/introducing-the-raspberry-pi-zero/audio-outputs)

 

  • 1 × Commodore 64
  • 1 × Raspberry Pi Zero W
  • 1 × 75HC245 For 5V / 3.3V translation
  • 1 × Custom board To be designed.

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Interface the Raspberry Pi Zero W to Commodore 64