Raspberry Pi Soft Power Controller

James Lewis designed this AVR based power controller for the Raspberry Pi that can safely shutdown the Pi:

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Raspberry Pi Soft Power Controller

The total circuit includes an AVR microcontroller, a near-zero current LDO, and a switching (buck) supply. My current design draws about 350nA when Vin is 9V. The AVR controls power to the Raspberry Pi. Two GPIO pins are used. One for the AVR to initiate a shutdown and one for Raspberry Pi to tell AVR after filesystem has been unmounted.
The design files and source are shared on GitHub:

baldengineer/Raspberry-Pi-Soft-Power-Controller

Raspberry Pi Soft Power Controller

Pi0CKET-tiny

From moosepr on Hackaday.io:

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Pi0CKET-tiny

Possibly the worlds smallest Pi based gaming device!

 

Our 0.8mm thickness 2 layer service was used to make it as slim as possible:

 

The designs for a 3-D printed case are shared on the Hackaday.io project page:

 

 

Pi0CKET-tiny

Ultrasound Imaging with Raspberry Pi

 writes on the Hackaday blog:20170529_203924_notes

Best Product Entry: A HSDK for Ultrasound Imaging

As an entry into this year’s Best Product portion of the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is developing a hardware and software development kit for ultrasound imaging.

Ultrasound is one of the primary tools used in modern diagnostic medicine. Head to the doctor with abdominal pain, and you can bet you’ll be seeing the business end of an ultrasound system. While Ultrasound systems have gotten cheaper, they aren’t something everyone has in the home yet.

AD9200

[kelu124] is working to change that by building a hardware and software development kit which can be used to explore ultrasound systems. This isn’t [kleu124’s] first rodeo. HSDK builds upon and simplifies Murgen, his first open source ultrasound, and an entry in the 2016 Hackaday prize. [kelu124’s] goal is to “simplify everything, making it more robust and more user-friendly”.

setup.png

The system is driven by a Raspberry Pi Zero W. A custom carrier board connects the Pi to the pulser block, which sends out the ultrasonic pings, and the analog front end, which receives the reflected signals. The receiver is called Goblin, and is a custom PCB designed [kelu124] designed himself. It uses a variable gain amplifier to bring reflected ultrasound signals up out of the noise.

 

Ultrasound Imaging with Raspberry Pi

“Ye Olde Nowt” Raspberry Pi Game Console

From Radomir Dopieralski on Hackaday.io:

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Ye Olde Nowt

Yet another pi zero retro handheld game console.

Quantity Component name
1 Raspberry Pi Zero
1 1.5″ SSD1351 Display Module
2 Small SMD Speakers
2 33nF SMD Capacitor
2 1µF SMD Capacitor
2 150kΩ SMD Resistor
2 270kΩ SMD Resistor
6 Buttons
6 90° Buttons
1 ZeroLiPO
1 1S LiPo Battery

8650341498134170367

“Ye Olde Nowt” Raspberry Pi Game Console

Multifunction Raspberry Pi Chiptune Player

General Instrument’s AY-3-8910 is a chip associated with video game music and is became popular with arcade games and pinball machines. The chip tunes produced by this IC are iconic and are reminiscent of a great era for electronics. [Deater] has done an amazing job at creating a harmony between the old and new with his Raspberry…

via Multifunction Raspberry Pi Chiptune Player — Hackaday

Multifunction Raspberry Pi Chiptune Player