5×10 PixelLeaf RGB Matrix

Add RGB light to your project with this PixelLeaf display from Oak Dev Tech on Tindie:

5×10 PixelLeaf RGB Matrix – SK6812mini RGB Matrix

What is it?

A small but bright RGB matrix sized at 5×10 to provide a nice wide matrix for your project. Compatible with Adafruit NeoPixel libraries and FastLED. This is made with the SK6812mini meaning you can rest assured that the display will remain bright even if there is fluctuations in supply voltage.

Why did you make it?

I thought it would be fun to make an RGB matrix display for small projects where standard displays might not fit right.

What makes it special?

It’s 1:2 ratio makes it perfect for long format projects that don’t need square displays, but ones that would be better for scrolling or smaller form factors.

5×10 PixelLeaf RGB Matrix

AtomIO Simplifies Your Breadboard UI

We’ve all been there, you hook things up to a breadboard, only to find that you need to figure out a simple LED indicator to see what’s going on, or have to use a wire or two as an input “button.” This is fine, but not really optimal. You can of course add actual buttons and switches, and perhaps cut down your LEDs to make them more presentable, but this takes up valuable space and time.

If you’d like a little shortcut to this problem, then the Atom IO may be just what you need. The device plugs in to the + and – rails of a breadboard, with 5 lines that connect to 3 LEDs, as well as 2 buttons. The LEDs are routed to the ground rail, so if you apply 2-ish volts, each will light up. The buttons are normally pulled low, but supply voltage from the positive rail when engaged.

Read more: AtomIO Simplifies Your Breadboard UI — Tindie Blog

AtomIO Simplifies Your Breadboard UI

Piotr Esden designs iCEBreaker-bitsy FPGA Atreus Keyboard

Piotr Esden showed the “After Dark” PCBs for the iCEBreaker-bitsy FPGA Atreus Keyboard yesterday on the “Electronics Let’s Play” Twitch stream:

Piotr Esden designs iCEBreaker-bitsy FPGA Atreus Keyboard

Lucky Resistor: Let’s Print a Cat/Pet Feeding Device

From the Lucky Resistor blog:

The seventh part of this series is all about the sensor board. It hosts the position sensor and four fill sensors. Speaking of sensors sounds complex, but these are just pairs of IR-LEDs and phototransistors. All design files for the board are in the GitHub repository and if you missed one of the previous parts, look at the overview page.

Read more…

Lucky Resistor: Let’s Print a Cat/Pet Feeding Device

Attiny LED Letter Keychain

Alexisgm97 documents this LED keychain project on Instructables:

Attiny LED Letter Keychain

Today I am going to show you how to make a very cool LED keychain. To do this, we are going to use an ATtiny to make the LEDs blink and fade. This is going to help us to learn how to solder SMD components and also how to program an ATtiny.

You can also find the code here in case you want to modify it or even create a new one! This code has 4 modes: All on, slow blink, fade and fast blink that change every time we press the button and then it enters in sleep mode to save battery.

Once we have finished, we can carry our creation around with our keys as a keychain!

Are you ready? Enjoy!

Attiny LED Letter Keychain

Raspberry Pi OS Fan Control

Jeremy Cook writes about a simple project to keep the Raspberry Pi 4 cool:

Raspberry Pi OS Fan Control

While passive cooling options are often good enough to avoid overheating and thermal throttling–and I do love a ridiculously oversized heat sink–at some point you’ll need to think about using a cooling fan. The problem is that the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins don’t supply enough power to get one going.

One alternative is to hook the fan up to a 5V and ground pin, and just have it run continuously. However, this seems slightly wasteful power-wise, and potentially quite annoying. As outlined previously, you can also use a transistor and temperature-reactive Bash script to turn a fan on and off via the processor’s temperature. Things have changed since mid-2020, however, and Raspberry Pi OS now has this functionality built-in. Making things even more convenient, if you’re using a fan with a PWM input, you don’t actually need to add an extra transistor!

Read more…

Raspberry Pi OS Fan Control

TO-220 Buck Converter: drop-in replacement for linear regulator

Ketan Desai designed this tiny PCB to be a DC-DC converter that works as a drop in replacement for old TO-220 linear regulators:

TO-220 Buck Converter

Swap out your LDO for a switcher today, with these designs for a modern take on the TO-220 mounted LM1117 and 78xx series LDO regulators!
This project is my take on a quick and easy replacement for the 3-pin LDO. The aim is to replace TO-220 linear regulators with a switching converter, in pursuit of higher efficiencies and current capacity.

Using a Recom RPX series DC-DC module for its small size and incorporating SMD feedback resistors and bulk capacitance on board allows for a drop-in replacement to existing LDO designs, while remaining in the same overall footprint as the counterpart.

As LM1117 LDOs have a different pinout to the 78xx series of regulators, I designed two versions of the layout.

TO-220 Buck Converter: drop-in replacement for linear regulator

When Toasters Fly…

We love this nod to the After Dark screensaver, back when displays came with degauss buttons. Naturally, Electric Crowbar used our “After Dark” service (clear solder mask on black substrate).

The board is available for order as a shared project:

When Toasters Fly…

Hackaday Remoticon: learn to solder surface mount in style!

The annual Hackaday Supercon is taking place as Remoticon this year on November 6th to 8th. The talented Thomas Flummer has design a PCB badge based on the SMD challenge that can be further customized in KiCad.

There is still time before November 6th to order the board from the shared project page in “After Dark”:

NOTE: make sure to check “After Dark” in the cart

Hackaday Remoticon: learn to solder surface mount in style!