Listen to your muscles!

Upside Down Labs has this neat kit on Tindie that lets you listen to your muscles!

BioAmp v1.5 kit

BioAmp v1.5 is a single chip biopotential amplifier. It can record any biopotential signal non-invasively and doesn’t require any microcontroller to sample the signal. You just plug 9v Battery to board, Electrodes to body and Audio jack to Mobile/Laptop and you are ready to record signals like EMG, ECG, EOG, and EEG. You can record the signals on a pc using audacity OR on mobile using Backyard Brain’s spike recorder app.

Listen to your muscles!

Switch Your SID Up!

The SID Chip is one of the most hallowed components of electronic equipment, housed inside the original Commodore 64 and responsible for some of the most iconic chiptunes ever made. The Commodore 64 & 128 GOLD SID Sound Interface Device is a direct replacement for the original SID chip which will ensure the rare and valuable chip is safe, while accurately replicating its output and performance.

The chip installation will include desoldering the original chip, which will require some advanced soldering skills – but there are many tutorials online which will help you with this and it can be done however scary it may seem! The SID chip in the Commodore 64 came in two versions – the MOS 6581 and the 8580, both of which can be replaced by this neat board.

Read more on the Tindie blog…

Switch Your SID Up!

TO-220 Buck Converter: drop-in replacement for linear regulator

Ketan Desai designed this tiny PCB to be a DC-DC converter that works as a drop in replacement for old TO-220 linear regulators:

TO-220 Buck Converter

Swap out your LDO for a switcher today, with these designs for a modern take on the TO-220 mounted LM1117 and 78xx series LDO regulators!
This project is my take on a quick and easy replacement for the 3-pin LDO. The aim is to replace TO-220 linear regulators with a switching converter, in pursuit of higher efficiencies and current capacity.

Using a Recom RPX series DC-DC module for its small size and incorporating SMD feedback resistors and bulk capacitance on board allows for a drop-in replacement to existing LDO designs, while remaining in the same overall footprint as the counterpart.

As LM1117 LDOs have a different pinout to the 78xx series of regulators, I designed two versions of the layout.

TO-220 Buck Converter: drop-in replacement for linear regulator

nRF9160 Feather combines mobile data, GPS and low power

Jared Wolff designed this nRF9160-based board in the Adafruit Feather form-factor featuring cellular connectivity, GPS and low power features:

nRF9160 Feather

The nRF9160 Feather by Jared Wolff (aka Circuit Dojo LLC) is an electronics development board. It features tghe nRF9160 by Nordic Semiconductor. This part is capable of both CAT M1 LTE and NB-IoT for communication with the outside world. It’s compatible with the Zephyr RTOS which is fully baked into Nordic’s nRF Connect SDK. Other toolchains and languages coming soon to a Github repository near you.

nRF9160 Feather combines mobile data, GPS and low power

Humo the Soldering Fume Collector

From Jo Hinchliffe on the Tindie blog:

Humo the Soldering Fume Collector

Whether you use lead free or leaded solder, it’s always a good idea to avoid inhaling fumes whilst soldering. This cute character “Humo” can help keep your lungs healthy whilst you tinker.

Humo is a kit by Blinkyparts and features a cute laser-cut enclosure and a collection of parts to make a fume extractor/collector. There is a 120mm fan included which draws fumes through a supplied activated charcoal filter to capture the fumes. Humo’s wooden legs allow you to position and angle it to get the best position whilst you work. For power it comes with a 12v supply and connector. Looking over the documentation, however, you could opt to add some parts yourself and make a 5V-12V boosted supply meaning it can then run from a USB socket or powerbank for portable use.

Finally, it’s fair to say that fume collectors are a great way to begin taking care of your lungs whilst soldering but you should also ensure that your work area is well ventilated giving you a good supply of fresh air!

Humo the Soldering Fume Collector

Soldering Kit for Doctor Who Fans

From Ken Olsen of Maker’s Box on Tindie:

Soldering Kit for Doctor Who Fans

Show off your Doctor Who cred with a DIY badge you can solder yourself. Powered by an Attiny85, lights and sounds like an 8-bit TARDIS. CR2032 Battery not included.

Kit Contains:

Soldering Kit for Doctor Who Fans

Penguino Feather LoRa dev board

MakerTronika Labs in Azerbaijan created this LoRaWAN capable dev board in Feather form factor:

Penguino Feather 4260 (SAMR34) LoRa Dev-Board

This is a SAMR34 based LoRa/LoRaWAN™ dev-board with all the necessary components for fast prototyping. It’s a successor of my previous Penguino SAMR34 design. The new design uses the RAK4260 module from @RAKWireless and improves on some aspects, such as a USB Type-C, a RGB LED, a user button, battery protection & voltage supervision, and optional flash & per-provisioned secure element IC pads.

Current HW version is v.1.2 and it’s offered in green soldermask (ENIG). All the design files can be found on my GitHub.

From v.1.2 onward the Penguino board also features CH340E USB-to-UART converter to further ease the development.

Penguino Feather LoRa dev board

Landing a UAV with Lasers

From Jo Hinchliffe on the Tindie blog:

Landing a UAV with Lasers

Do you want your UAV to make amazing autonomous landings? This laser interface board from Avionics Anonymous may well be just what you need.

Laser range finders can be useful on UAV as altimeters and can make autonomous landings easier to perform. However adding a laser range finder to your UAV can be a little tricky. You might want the laser to be positioned far away from your flight controller, meaning you don’t want to use I2C, and you might not have a serial port to spare. This interface board uses the robust CAN bus using to connect a range of popular Lightware lasers to the common Pixhawk autopilots and others.

The laser altimeter is utilising UAVCAN which is an opensource, MIT licensed, lightweight protocol designed for resilient intra-vehicular communications. The CAN bus can also be used to re-flash the firmware meaning if you change out your laser model you can still use this board. Supplied preconfigured for a laser of your choosing, this adaptor board is compact, lightweight and has numerous screw mounts designed to be easily removed if space is short and you want to mount it directly with double sided tape.

Landing a UAV with Lasers