Hackaday NYC Meetup on Thursday

This is a busy, busy week for Tindie and Hackaday. We’re going to New York, and we have a ton of events planned. First up is the monthly Hackaday meetup. This time, we’re teaming up with Kickstarter for a pre-Maker Faire Meetup. We’ll be hosting this at Kickstarter’s HQ, and already we have an impressive…

via A Slew Of NYC Meetups With Tindie And Hackaday This Week — Hackaday

Hackaday NYC + Kickstarter: Assistive Tech, Maker Faire, and more

Thursday, Sep 21, 2017, 6:30 PM

Location details are available to members only.

109 Makers Attending

Join us on Thursday, September 21st as Hackaday MakeIt NYC teams up with Kickstarter for a pre-Maker Faire Meetup! We’ll feature awesome talks and demos with a special spotlight on Assistive Technologies. Stay tuned for more details!CURRENTLY CONFIRMED:Anita Perr & R. Luke Dubois  (The NYU Ability Project)Anita Perr, PhD, ATP, FAOTA, is a Clini…

Check out this Meetup →

(Drew Fustini will be there, too)

Hackaday NYC Meetup on Thursday

Tindie Names in Hackaday Prize Best Product Finalists

From  on the Tindie blog:
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The first comes from Nick Sayer of Geppetto Electronics. His store includes a variety of interesting hardware devices, but his Hackaday Prize entry, an encryption system named Orthrus, is different from anything seen there.

orus

Keeping data secure is important, but if you simply need a little entertainment, or perhaps are looking for a good way to program in CircuitPython, Radomir Dopieralski of the Deshipu Store has a new idea with the PewPew FeatherWing project. According to its description

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Tindie Names in Hackaday Prize Best Product Finalists

3D Scanner HAT for Raspberry Pi

From Jonathan Cohen on Tindie:
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3D Scanner HAT for Raspberry Pi

3D Scanner HAT expansion board interface for Raspberry Pi running FreeLSS on the PICLOP ATLAS FreeLSS

 

I wanted to make a custom interface for use with the open-source 3D Scanning software, FreeLSS. I was very impressed with the Arduino-based Ciclop scanner and the Raspberry Pi-based Atlas Scanner. Several FreeLSS users merged the two scanner platforms, creating the PiCLOP 3D Scanner. However, there were few changes to the basic PCB design used for the scanner. I wanted to integrate the hardware functionality into a Raspberry Pi HAT format, with the inclusion of extra features for expandability — and who knows, other uses !

 

What makes it special?

  • Conforms to the Pi Foundation specification for HATs !
  • 5V power design (only a single voltage) allowing for Pololu low-voltage stepper driver carrier.
  • Connections for up to two independent soft-PWM controlled LED light sources.
  • I2C interface for OLED displays and light intensity sensors, e.g. TSL2561 or TSL2591.
  • Serial communication breakout for console support.
  • Additional GPIO signal breakouts for other sensors and devices.
  • User-programmable EEPROM ! for auto-configuration and device overlays.
  • Standard DC power connector for up to 5V 4A power supply and connections for power switch.
  • Over-current protection by poly re-settable fuse.
3D Scanner HAT for Raspberry Pi

ATXMega32E5 adapted for a breadboard

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ATXMega32E5 breakout board

The ATXMega32E5 is the next step up for those experienced with the AVR series of microcontrollers from Microchip (formerly Atmel). They use the same compilers and libraries as the rest of the AVR 8- and 16-bit families, but they can run at 32 MHz and have an amazingly powerful set of internal peripherals that can take your projects to the next level and beyond.

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For prototyping, however, the disadvantage is that the XMega chips are not available as through-hole parts. That’s where this breakout board comes into play.

nsayer has shared the board on OSH Park:

ATXMega_E5 breakout v1.0

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Order from OSH Park

ATXMega32E5 adapted for a breadboard

Tindie Seller Interview: Alex Albino

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interviewed Alex Albino of Femtoduino for the Tindie blog:

Alex Albino, of the Femtoduino Store, is one of the original sellers on Tindie, with his store officially listed as opening on November 26, 2012. During this time, he’s sold well over 300 of his custom boards, and I was glad to catch up to him to ask a few questions.

Albino, who works as a software and web developer, first got into electronics after his NES was fried in a thunderstorm in junior high, and he got to take it apart. Eventually his interests led him to the Arduino and Fabio Varesano’s work, and multiple hardware platforms over the years.

Albino’s store started with him asking Fabio Varesano if he could sell Femtoduino boards, which have the same outputs as an Arduino Uno in the size of one’s thumb. Since Varesano wasn’t interested in selling them himself, he generously gave Albino permission to run with this design. Albino then went to work assembling and selling these boards, and even made sure to give a portion of the money he made—though he didn’t have to—back to Varesano to promote his open source work.

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Of course, these tiny Arduino clones are still for sale, but Albino sells several other items, including the FemtoBeacon wireless IMU (inertial measurement unit) sensor. He even notes his store theme as providing the smallest open source IMU sensors in the world. You can see one in the image above next to a U.S. dime—quite small indeed. He hopes to grow the Femtobeacon business into a full-time job in the future.

Naturally, Albino has bought from other Tindarians in the past, which he says is always fun. He also notes that, “If you sell anything on Tindie, make sure to package carefully, take decent photos, and include videos of stuff in action!” As such, here’s a video of the tiny Femtoduino in action:

Tindie Seller Interview: Alex Albino