Don’t Miss Out on the Best Virtual Hardware Conference of 2020

From Christina Ramsey on the Tindie blog:

Don’t Miss Out on the Best Virtual Hardware Conference of 2020!

Do you love everything hardware?! Then the 2020 Hackaday Remoticon has you covered this November!

Remoticon is a fully virtual hardware conference with 20+ workshops, 2 keynote talks, and 8 different demos. Join the weekend fun from wherever you are. Remoticon will have instructors teaching workshops from all across the globe, from Australia to India, from North America to the Netherlands.

Meeting virtually provides the perfect platform for more space, more people, and more options. Attend demos about Design Methodology, Robots, Zero to ASIC, Edge-Based Voice AI, and other awesome topics. Join workshops covering topics such as Reverse Engineering, Tiny ML, How to Hack a Car, Glowy Origami, and so many more.

In need of some creative inspiration and socialization with fellow hackers? Come hang out Friday night for a community Bring-A-Hack! There’s even a virtual Hackaday SMD Challenge for those who want to learn and those who want to put their skills to the test.

You’ll never guess the best part. I’m sure you’re thinking, “how could this get any better?” Remoticon Main Track tickets are free! You can also donate with a pay-as-you-wish ticket. Donations will go to charities that feed, house, or educate people.

Attendees only pay $10 to join a workshop. Some workshops do require hardware, which may include things you already have sitting on your workbench.

So the real question is what workshops and demos are you going to pack into your schedule the weekend of November 6-8th? We can’t wait to see you all there!

Don’t Miss Out on the Best Virtual Hardware Conference of 2020

Easy Joule Thief Soldering Kit

The MakersBox has a great kit for beginners on Tindie:

Easy Joule Thief Soldering Kit

The perfect night-light, and a great way to learn how to solder.

The Joule Thief is a clever little circuit that can light a LED with a battery that is nearly dead. It does this with a pair of opposing magnetic fields. I like this circuit because it is simple to build, yet demonstrates some very complex electrical behavior.

I’ve designed a printed circuit board to help make this easier to build for beginning Makers. I used open source KiCAD software to lay it out (a future Instructable?), and OSHPark to manufacture it. If you want to just wire one up without the board, check out Angelo’s Instructable which uses essentially the same circuit.

The kit contains:

  • 1 – PCB, https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/rLeF8F88
  • 2 – AA Battery Clip, Keystone Electronics #92
  • 1 – Ferrite Tubular Bead, Digi-Key 240-2301-ND or similar
  • 1 – SPDT slide switch, E-Switch EG1218
  • 1 – 1K resistor 1/8 – 1/4 W
  • 1 – PN2222 Resistor, Fairchild Semiconductor PN2222ATA
  • nanoseconds (about 24″) of insulated wire. Two different colors are helpful.
  • 1 – LED, 10mm white (or use your own)
Easy Joule Thief Soldering Kit

LED powered by body heat

bobricius designed this low voltage step up converter module with white LED:

40mV module for body heat powered white LED

Features

  • startup voltage 40mV
  • requires only peltier element (not included)
  • white LED

HOW IT WORK

  • Peltier module generates very low electricity from temperature difference.
  • Has two sides. If you keep COOL side (with aluminium cooler) at about 20 degrees and HOT side you heat with your body (fingers, forehead) with temperature etc 37 degrees you get about 40mV.
  • This converter module increases this very low voltage to power white led.

Here is a video of the project:

LED powered by body heat

UV-C Germicidal LED Module

From Jeremy S Cook on the Tindie blog:

UV-C Germicidal LED Module

With concerns about the transmission of COVID-19 at the forefront of society’s collective consciousness, UV light—especially the UV-C range—has been put forth as a possible solution. But how does one produce UV light indoors? UV LEDs of course!

For this purpose, prolific Tindarian Bobricius has come up with an LED module with a single 275nm UV-C light onboard. It includes the proper resistor to keep it functioning properly via a 9V power source, making it easy to implement.

While it may be effective, the listing notes that it is untested on viruses and bacteria. You’ll of course want to use it appropriately based on that information, and also note that it can be harmful to skin and eyes.

So why then did Bobricius make this contraption? As in so many works of science fiction, he had been dreaming of a radiation killing module. Now perhaps such a device can be used for good. Notably, there is a significant discount for orders of more than one, so perhaps a “killer array” would be a better option than a single source of radiation in this case!

Of course, makers aren’t just on the germ-offensive these days. As seen here, there’s been a huge push to produce PPE, especially during early shortages of a few months ago.

UV-C Germicidal LED Module

Simultaneous Soldering Station

https://hackaday.io/project/171848-soldering-rt1

Soldering irons are a personal tool. Some folks need them on the cool side, and some like it hot. Getting it right takes some practice and experience, but when you find a tip and temp that works, you stick with it. [Riccardo Pittini] landed somewhere in the middle with his open-source soldering station, Soldering RT1. When you start it up, it asks what temperature you want, and it heats up. Easy-peasy. When you are ready to get fancy, you can plug in a second iron, run off a car battery, record preset temperatures, limit your duty-cycle, and open a serial connection.

The controller has an Arduino bootloader on a 32u4 processor, so it looks like a ProMicro to your computer. The system works with the RT series of Weller tips, which have a comprehensive lineup. [Riccardo] also recreated SMD tweezers, and you can find everything at his Tindie store.

Soldering has a way of bringing out opinions from novices to masters. If we could interview our younger selves, we’d have a few nuggets of wisdom for those know-it-alls. If ergonomics are your priority, check out TS100 3D-printed cases, which is an excellent iron, in our opinion.

Read more: Simultaneous Soldering Station — Hackaday

Simultaneous Soldering Station

RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

We were exited to see this use of a flex PCB to create a backplane for the RC2014:

RC2014 is a simple 8 bit Z80 based modular computer originally built to run Microsoft BASIC. It is inspired by the home built computers of the late 70s and computer revolution of the early 80s. It is not a clone of anything specific, but there are suggestions of the ZX81, UK101, S100, Superboard II and Apple I in here. It nominally has 8K ROM, 32K RAM, runs at 7.3728MHz and communicates over serial at 115,200 baud.

RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

Give the gift of a personalized PCB keychain

From n°Garage offers personalized one square-inch keychains on Tindie:

2020-04-24T17_06_18.039Z-dolphin-bot

n°Keychain

This n°Keychain family consists of a series of one-square-inch keychains or pendants. These little beauties are perfect gifts for festival, graduation and remembrance. And more, write lovely words to make it unique and personal.

One order will have two keychains or pendants. To customize it, please choose the option from the drop down above if you would like to add personalized text.

  • Background Words(0~15chars): BRAVE / KIND / Curious / Hindsight 2020
  • Time Mark (0~15chars): Happy New Year / Happy Birthday / Class 2020
  • Name Tag (0~25chars): Alice / Rob / Queen Elizabeth School

If ordering the customizable option, please leave the details of the above inside the field of Additional Instructions at checkout. Please do not exceed the maximum number of characters for each field.

For personalized keychain, it may take about 5 to 9 workdays to ship after ordering. An email notification will be sent to you once shipped. Usually the shipping takes about 10 work-days.

Give the gift of a personalized PCB keychain

Tidy Laser Cut Packaging For PCBs With KiCAD

A laser cutter is a useful tool to have in any workshop. While many hackers use them for their cutting abilities, it’s important to remember that they can be great as engravers, too. [Wrickert] was well aware of this when he set his to work, producing attractive packaging for his Tindie orders.

[Wrickert] sells a variety of small PCB-based devices on Tindie, and it’s nice to have something to package them up with, rather than just sending a bare board. To do this quickly and effectively, KiCAD is used to help generate the packaging from the original PCB geometry itself. The board outlines are exported as an SVG file, reopened in KiCAD, and then used to create the required cardboard parts. The laser can then also be used to engrave the cardboard too.

It’s a tidy packaging solution that requires no messy inks or printers, and can be designed in the same software as the device itself. We’ve covered this area before, talking about what it takes to go from a home project to a saleable kit. If you’re in the game, you might find [Wrickert]’s hack to be just the ticket!

via Tidy Laser Cut Packaging For PCBs With KiCAD — Hackaday

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Tindie: breadboard-friendly button from AtomSoft

AtomSoftTech has a convenient little board to make it easy to connect a tact switch to a breadboard:

2020-06-08T22_59_20.243Z-atomSW_md

AtomSW on Tindie

What is it?

A button you can be glad to have.

Why did you make it?

There isnt a small breadboard-able button out there with the features on this one.

What makes it special?

You have a selectable Pull-Up or Pull-Down and selectable High Output or Low Output. Using simple solder jumpers you can select between Pull up or Pull Down and what is the output of the button. All in a TINY PCB takinng almost no space on your PCB. No need to wire anything its breadboard friendly. Connects to the power rails and data side as well

2020-06-09T00_53_24.853Z-AtomSW_BF

Tindie: breadboard-friendly button from AtomSoft

FemtoBeacon ESP32-PICO-D4 wireless IMU coin

Femtoduino has designed a dime sized (18mm diameter) Wi-Fi/Bluetooth wireless IMU (inertial measurement unit) that runs MicroPython:

Screenshot from 2020-06-02 23-16-50

FemtoBeacon ESP32-PICO-D4 (4MiB) wireless IMU coin

What is it?

The world’s smallest open-source Wireless IMU. It has an ICM-20948 MPU (9-axis: accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer), and an MS561101BA03-50 precision altimeter/temperature sensor.

The coin uses the ESP32-PICO-D4 chip (4MiB) and has all peripherals attached via SPI (hSPI).

Requires a USB to UART adapter that can provide pass-through 5V to coin VIN pin and at least 500mA to 3V3 pin.

Pin Out:

  • RGB LED, Red pin: 26
  • RGB LED, Green pin: 4
  • RGB LED, Blue pin: 5
  • hSPI SCK pin: 14
  • hSPI MOSI pin: 13
  • hSPI MISO pin: 12
  • MPU Chip Select pin: 15
  • Altimeter Chip Select pin: 27

Why did you make it?

I made these for use in personal projects where I need a very small motion processing unit.

What makes it special?

It’s incredibly small, light weight, and open source!

FemtoBeacon ESP32-PICO-D4 wireless IMU coin