Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

From on the Tindie blog:

encoder

Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

Makernet Knob’s makes the point that “Rotary encoders are cool but hard to wire into your projects.” Having wired up a custom input device for my computer using an encoder, I can attest to both of these statements. In my case, it took me quite a bit of time simply to figure out how each encoder pin was used!

 

Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

How Fast is Your Fidget Spinner?

From Ken Olsen of The Maker’s Box:

How Fast is Your Fidget Spinner?

You never know what people will do with your ideas, and it is always fun to see someone do something I would have never thought off with them.  I got a video from someone who built my Programmable Fidget Spinner, and used a leaf blower to see how fast they could get it to go.  Fortunately, they were wearing safety glasses, and no, it didn’t come flying apart.  It did, however, start displaying erratically at about 3600 RPM (the fastest I can get it by hand is just under 2000 RPM).

So, what is going on?  TLDR: I figured it out and fixed it, and here is proof.

How Fast is Your Fidget Spinner?

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

RAMPS compatible driver module based on DRV8818 by Dean Gouramanis:

Screenshot from 2017-11-15 01-01-04

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

The goal of this project is to fit the DRV8818 driver circuit onto the standard 0.8″ X 0.6″ PCB size used in RAMPS 3D printers. DRV8825 drivers are a popular choice for desktop 3D printers, because they can provide up to 2.5 amps peak current. The DRV8818 is a similar IC capable of driving up to 3.5 amps, but the circuit is too large to fit on PCB using regular methods. Also, without a propper heatsink it will overheat.

Schematic, gerbers and mechanical CAD files are shared on GitHub:

dgouramanis/T18_driver

 
DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

Tiny ESP32 board from the store on Tindie with optional battery header and pSRAM:

Screenshot from 2017-11-15 00-17-12.png

Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

It’s a little ESP32 Board. Perfect for controlling or sensing stuff in the real world and sync it to the internet! Despite that it features the ESP32 WROVER Module. This means it got 4MB FLASH and 4MB RAM. That’s an absolute incredible amount of RAM. I honestly have no clue for what I will ever need 4MB in my embedded Projects.

Screenshot from 2017-11-15 00-25-49

Why did you make it?

I wanted a small ESP32 Board with the pSRAM and which works and doesn’t eat your whole time to get it working and find it’s issues and quirks.

I’ve used the CP2102 Serial converter because this is the one, which works the best way to program the ESP32. Even Espressif uses this serial converter on their own dev boards.

2017-11-14T20:11:04.072Z-IMG_20171114_204145

What makes it special?

It’s propably the smallest ESP32 Board with pSRAM. Despite the size it’s ideal for battery operation. It uses under 200uA in Deep Sleep mode!

2017-11-14T21:18:21.815Z-IMG_20171114_221457

Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera

From Jeremy S. Cook on the Tindie blog:

grid-cam.jpg

Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera

Thermal imaging has remained an interesting, if costly, technology for some time. One lower cost option is the the Grid-EYE sensor from Panasonic. While it has a resolution of only 8×8 pixels, it’s priced in the low double digit range, making it an ideal candidate for budget projects. If you’d like to add it to your build, Pesky Products has a has a breakout available that allows it to be used with the I²C protocol.

grid-eye

Xose Pérez, after finding this sensor and breakout on Tindie, which he (correctly) considers “a great place to find uncommon electronic components or weird/interesting boards,” decided to make his own low-resolution IR camera. At only 64 pixels of resolution, it’s not as capable as more expensive units, but it could still be very useful for getting a general idea of what is hot and cold in a room/environment. The case is made out of slices of acrylic, paper, cardboard, and MDF, giving it a very unique look. It also features a small screen to display supplemental information, and a simple button/switch  interface.

Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera

Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

From Jeremy S. Cook on the Tindie blog:

encoder (1).jpg

Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

Makernet Knob’s makes the point that “Rotary encoders are cool but hard to wire into your projects.” Having wired up a custom input device for my computer using an encoder, I can attest to both of these statements. In my case, it took me quite a bit of time simply to figure out how each encoder pin was used!

2017-10-06T21_08_06.531Z-GM1200PTH pic4.jpg.855x570_q85_pad_rcrop.jpg

To help alleviate complicated wiring issues, this custom knob features a built-in I2C interface, which allows several (even hundereds) of knobs to be chained together without issue. Additionally, the top of the encoder can be depressed as a pushbutton, and it even has an RGB LED integrated inside of it to give you feedback right on the knob!

Rotary Encoder with I2C Interface and RGB Lighting

Micro SD Extension Cable

 writes on the Tindie blog:

extension1-wb

Micro SD Extension Cable

Weirdly, one problem with memory now being so small is that these drives can be placed in areas that are difficult to access. Usually this means some sort of USB adapter (another amazing improvement over serial or parallel ports), but if you just want an actual SD extension cable in the form of a micro SD card, here it is! This device was conceived of when programming a BeagleBone Black, and could have lots of other applications.

extension2

I designed this little tool while compiling a software installation on BeagleBone Black. I needed to repetitively remove/inset the micro SD card. The BeagleBone was installed in a hard-to-reach area. So much time was wasted trying to inset the card with tweezers.

This simple tool plugs into the hard-to-reach socket, and provides a flexible extension.

Length: 3.5″

Screenshot from 2017-10-19 12-47-58.png

Micro SD Extension Cable