Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

Shared project from Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen on OSH Park:

ic_mkl04_refboard2

Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

A known good reference board for testing the MKL04 chip when building a DIY Teensy 3.6. Refer to this table for the differences between Teensy 3.6 and other models. The soldering friendly LQFP package (at least more friendly than BGA) is used on this board.

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Order from OSH Park

Parts Placement Diagram

Bill Of Materials

1   MK66FX1M0VLQ18
1   IC_MKL04Z32_TQFP32
1   USB A Connector
1   USB Mini B Connector
1   Micro SD Socket
1   MCP1825S Voltage Regulator
1   TPD3S014 USB Power Switch
1   Crystal, 16 MHz
1   Crystal, 32.768 kHz
3   Diode, Schottky, B120
1   Capacitor, 100uF, 6.3V
4   Capacitor, 4.7uF
10  Capacitor, 0.1uF
1   Resistor, 100K
2   Resistor, 470
2   Resistor, 220
2   Resistor, 33
1   Pushbutton
2   Test Point, Black
Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

RasmusB on Hackaday.io is resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA:

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Psioπ

Bringing a Psion Series 5 into this decade by replacing all the important bits.

The completed result will (hopefully) be a portable modern Linux system with all the connectivity options expected in a modern device.

The keyboard adapter board is available on Tindie:

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USB keyboard adapter for Psion Series 5 keyboards

This is an USB interface for Psion series 5 PDA keyboards. Plug in a keyboard and a USB cable, and use it with any modern computer!

The design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smallRasmusB/PsioPi

Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

EEPROM Programmer Arduino Shield

From the The Oddbloke Geek Blog, an EEPROM programmer shield designed for Arduino Mega:

EEPROM_Programmer_And_Arduino_Mega.jpg

Simple EEPROM Programmer … revisited

Some time ago, I wrote about my DIY EEPROM programmer driven by an Arduino Mega. It’s a very simple, low-tech project … but has attracted a consistently-high number of visitors to the site and is something I use several times a week.

EEPROM Programmer Arduino Shield

E-Ink controller with ice40 FPGA

eink_featured

writes on Hackaday:

E-ink Display Driven DIY

E-ink displays are awesome. Humans spent centuries reading non-backlit devices, and frankly it’s a lot easier on the eyes. But have you looked into driving one of these critters yourself? It’s a nightmare. So chapeau! to [Julien] for his FPGA-based implementation that not only uses our favorite open-source FPGA toolchain, and serves as an open reference implementation for anyone else who’s interested.

Watch the E-Ink controller in action:

Design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smalljulbouln/ice40_eink_controller

julbouln has shared the board on OSH Park:

eink controller

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Order from OSH Park

E-Ink controller with ice40 FPGA

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Bob Baddeley writes on Hackaday:

Giant Solderless LEGO NES Controller Gives Everyone Tiny Hands

[BrownDogGadgets] built a giant NES controller out of LEGO. The controller is designed in LEGO Digital Designer, which lets you create a virtual model, then get a full list of parts which can be ordered online.

The electronics are based on a Teensy LC programmed to appear as a USB keyboard, and the buttons are standard push buttons. The insides are wired together with nylon conductive tape. LEGO was an appropriate choice because the Teensy and switches are built on top of LEGO compatible PCBs, so components are just snapped in place. The system is called Crazy Circuits and is a pretty neat way to turn electronics into a universal and reusable system.

Here is the controller in action:

Design files and source code for Crazy Circuits modules and projects are available on GitHub:

github-smallBrownDogGadgets/CrazyCircuits

Find out more in our previous blog post:

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller