Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

Shared project from Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen on OSH Park:

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Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

A known good reference board for testing the MKL04 chip when building a DIY Teensy 3.6. Refer to this table for the differences between Teensy 3.6 and other models. The soldering friendly LQFP package (at least more friendly than BGA) is used on this board.

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Parts Placement Diagram

Bill Of Materials

1   MK66FX1M0VLQ18
1   IC_MKL04Z32_TQFP32
1   USB A Connector
1   USB Mini B Connector
1   Micro SD Socket
1   MCP1825S Voltage Regulator
1   TPD3S014 USB Power Switch
1   Crystal, 16 MHz
1   Crystal, 32.768 kHz
3   Diode, Schottky, B120
1   Capacitor, 100uF, 6.3V
4   Capacitor, 4.7uF
10  Capacitor, 0.1uF
1   Resistor, 100K
2   Resistor, 470
2   Resistor, 220
2   Resistor, 33
1   Pushbutton
2   Test Point, Black
Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Bob Baddeley writes on Hackaday:

Giant Solderless LEGO NES Controller Gives Everyone Tiny Hands

[BrownDogGadgets] built a giant NES controller out of LEGO. The controller is designed in LEGO Digital Designer, which lets you create a virtual model, then get a full list of parts which can be ordered online.

The electronics are based on a Teensy LC programmed to appear as a USB keyboard, and the buttons are standard push buttons. The insides are wired together with nylon conductive tape. LEGO was an appropriate choice because the Teensy and switches are built on top of LEGO compatible PCBs, so components are just snapped in place. The system is called Crazy Circuits and is a pretty neat way to turn electronics into a universal and reusable system.

Here is the controller in action:

Design files and source code for Crazy Circuits modules and projects are available on GitHub:

github-smallBrownDogGadgets/CrazyCircuits

Find out more in our previous blog post:

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

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Crazy Circuits: Unique STEM Projects Delivered Monthly

Create fun STEM and STEAM electronics projects with parts delivered to your door.

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Crazy Circuits is a non-soldering electronic learning platform that allows people to create circuits from almost any material they can imagine. Crazy Circuits are designed to pop onto LEGO™ bricks, enabling your LEGO™ creations to shine, move, and make noise. Use Crazy Circuits to construct paper crafts with conductive tape, use conductive thread for sewing, and create art with conductive inks and paints. You can even program sketches with Arduino compatible Crazy Circuits boards. No matter what you want to build, Crazy Circuits brings it all together.

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Musical Toothbrush by Joe Grand

Hackaday wrote about a nifty hack by Joe Grand:

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[Joe Grand’s] Toothbrush Plays Music That Doesn’t Suck

It’s not too exciting that [Joe Grand] has a toothbrush that plays music inside your head. That’s actually a trick that the manufacturer pulled off. It’s that [Joe] gave his toothbrush an SD card slot for music that doesn’t suck. The victim donor hardware for this project is a toothbrush meant for kids called Tooth Tunes.…

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Joe published full documentation for the project on his website:

The PCB is shared on OSH Park:

Tooth Tunes Hack

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Joe describes the project in this video:

Hear the toothbrush in action:

Musical Toothbrush by Joe Grand

Versatile ATtiny Programming Adapter

Lucky Resistor designed this programming adapter for ATtiny13 and similar chips:

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A Versatile ATtiny Programming Adapter

As mentioned in my article about designing a cheap plant watering sensor, I built a small adapter which can be used to pre-program the ATtiny13A. This is necessary, because once soldered on the board, I only have a debugWire interface, which has to be enabled first.

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The adapter has a small 50mil JTAG header, where the Atmel ICE can be connected with the board. There is also room for a USB mini jack, which is used to power the MCU while programming. A small on-off switch is used to power the MCU and a LED is placed as indicator to see if the MCU has power.

One of the DIL/ZIF adapters is mounted on top of the female headers. Most of the adapters for SO-8, SO-14 and SO-16 will work with this board.

To make the board more versatile, I added a number of jumpers and solder points. By default, the adapter is connecting to the right pins for the ATtiny13A, but you can cut these routes and solder wires onto the board to implement any kind of connection you like.

The design files are available on GitHub:

github.png LuckyResistor/ATtinyAdapter

LuckyResistor has shared the board on OSH Park:

ATtiny Adapter

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Versatile ATtiny Programming Adapter

ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board

We like the novel orientation of pogo pins that Wing Tang Wong used in this board design:

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ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board

Upcycles D1 Mini Wemos board to create a USB connected ESP8266 Pogo pin jig

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This is a board designed to take a WeMos D1 Mini board(with the ESP module removed) and use it as a USB interface with built-in reset/flash functionality for bare ESP8266 modules similar to the ESP-12 units.

The design files are available on GitHub:

github ESP8266 Programming D1 Mini Pogo Jig V1

ESP8266 Pogo Jig Programming Board