Hot Camera Contest: Build A Battery Powered Thermal Camera

Here’s a challenge for all you hardware hackers out there. Peter Jansen has opened up the Hot Camera Contest on Hackaday.io to use a thermal imaging camera in a battery-powered project.

The challenge here is simple. Use a Flir Lepton thermal imaging camera module in a battery-powered configuration. There’s a catch, though: this is a project to use the Lepton in radiometric mode, where the camera spits out an actual temperature value for each pixel. Yes, this is a documented feature in the Flir Lepton module, but so far very few people are using it, and no one has done it with a small, battery-powered device.

The rules for this challenge are to use the Flir Lepton 2.5 in radiometric mode using either the Raspberry Pi Zero W or ESP32. Any software in this challenge must spit out absolute temperature values in a text format, and there must be a demonstration of putting the Flir Lepton into low-power mode. There are two challenges here, one for the Raspi and one for the ESP32; and winner will be named for each.

via Hot Camera Contest: Build A Battery Powered Thermal Camera — Hackaday

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HDDG 32: Stimulating Communication Through Titillating Wearables

Bradley Ramsey recaps HDDG from last week:

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HDDG 32: Stimulating Communication Through Titillating Wearables

Sarah Petkus takes the stage to discuss her ongoing project, which measures and indicates human arousal using stylish wearables

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Sarah’s talk entitled SHE BON: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen, discusses her work on a unique new project aimed at encouraging communication around human sexuality. Sarah is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and was recently called a transhumanist, which fits really well once you’ve seen her presentation.

The term refers to an intellectual movement that seeks to elevate the human condition both mentally and physically through the use of technology. Sarah’s talk begins with her origins, which were rooted in feelings of powerlessness.

So, she did what any maker would do: she built a robot army. With the help of her colleague, she built an army of 100 delta robots that you control with physical gestures.

HDDG 32: Stimulating Communication Through Titillating Wearables

ERRF 18: The Start of Something Great

From  on the Hackaday blog:

ERRF 18: The Start of Something Great

For years, the undisputed king of desktop 3D printing conferences has been the Midwest RepRap Festival (MRRF). Hosted in the tropical paradise that is Goshen, Indiana, MRRF has been running largely unopposed for the top spot since its inception. There are other conferences focused on the industrial and professional end of the 3D printing spectrum, and of course you’d find a Prusa or two popping up at more or less any hacker con; but MRRF is focused on exploring what the individual is capable of once they can manifest physical objects from molten plastic.

But on June 23rd, 2018, MRRF finally got some proper competition. As the name might indicate, the East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) is an event very much inspired by its Hoosier State predecessor. Held in Bel Air, Maryland, hackers on the right side of the United States for the first time had the opportunity to attended a true 3D printing festival without having to get on a plane. Not to say it was a neighborhood block party; people from all over the country, and indeed the globe, descended on the APG Federal Credit Union Arena for the two-day celebration of everything plastic.

This inaugural ERRF was, to put it mildly, a massive success. A couple of Hackaday Field Agents were in attendance, and we definitely came away impressed with the event considering it was the first attempt. We saw evidence that the RepRap dream of printable printers is still going strong, a gaggle of new printers and products that will be prying at your wallet this year, and an American-made hotend that challenges traditional wisdom. Of course we also saw a huge number of 3D printing fanatics who were eager to show off their latest creations.

We have no doubt that ERRF will return again next year, but until then, you’ll have to settle for the following collection of selected highlights from this year’s show.

We’re no strangers to the work [David Shorey] has been doing with 3D printing on fabric, but it’s always awesome to see up close. The concept here is actually quite simple: pause the print after a few layers, pull a piece of tulle (the kind of thing bridal veils are made of) tight over the bed, and then let the print finish. The fabric is caught between the layers of the print, and as long as you aren’t too rough with it, will hold together quite nicely.

[David] wasn’t the only person to have this idea, but he certainly seems to be on the forefront of perfecting it. Perhaps the most interesting element of this technique is that essentially anyone with a 3D printer and a nearby fabric store can try their hand at it.

 

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Micro TV-B-Gone

From Nicholas Junker on Hackaday.io

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Micro TV-B-Gone

The Micro TV-B-Gone is based off of Adafruit’s original TV-B-Gone kit, except made to be as small as possible, using an LIR-2032 coin cell.

 

I based this project off of the Adafruit TV-B-Gone kit. I wanted to start getting into using surface mount components on my projects, and seeing as the TV-B-Gone was my first foray into soldering, I figured that it would be a great project to work on.

The device takes a rechargeable LIR-2032 battery, and is activated pressing the single button on top. It will run through all TV power codes, and then go into a low power mode, waiting for the next button press. The battery will last around 40 full cycles, before being reduced down to 3.5 volts.

Micro TV-B-Gone

Sarah Petkus: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Awesome talk by Sarah Petkus for HDDG last night at Supplyframe in SF:

Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic and mechanical devices which encourage reflection regarding the human relationship with technology.

Their talk will be about a series of wearable augments built to facilitate in sensing, tracking, and indicating one’s level of excitement (or arousal)! Each of the wearables uses a variety of sensors as input to influence quirky electronic and mechanical devices of my design as output. The goal in doing so is not only to create a stellar suit of electronic armor (or amour), but also to help facilitate a dialogue about sex and intimacy amongst my peers that is relatable, honest, healthy, and fun.

Follow Sarah and her projects on Patreon:Screenshot from 2018-07-13 13-00-51.pngSarah Petkus is creating ROBOTS

Sarah Petkus: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Hackaday Superconference: Tickets and Proposal

Get your tickets now for the 2018 Hackaday Superconference. Join us November 2nd-4th in Pasadena, California! This is the ultimate hardware conference. Hackers, designers, and engineers from all over the world converge — from the greenest beginners to those who have made history with their designs. This is the Hackaday community, these are your people,…

via Hackaday Superconference: Tickets and Proposals — Hackaday

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SF Hardware meetup this week with Sarah Petkus

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The next Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic (HDDG) take place at SupplyFrame in San Francisco this Thursday with Sarah Petkus and Ryan Cousins:

HDDG 32: Communicating with the Unseen

Come enjoy yummy snacks and bevs and hear fascinating talks by these kickass engineers.

Sarah Petkus – SHE BON: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen

Ryan Cousins – How and Why We Failed at Everything (So You Don’t Have To)

HDDG 32: Communicating with the Unseen

Thursday, Jul 12, 2018, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe / Hackaday San Francisco Office
500 3rd Street, Suite 230 San Francisco, CA

54 Hardware Developers Attending

Come enjoy yummy snacks and bevs and hear fascinating talks by these kickass engineers. Sarah Petkus – SHE BON: Using Body-data to communicate the intimate and the unseen Ryan Cousins – How and Why We Failed at Everything (So You Don’t Have To) Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic an…

Check out this Meetup →

Sarah Petkus is a kinetic artist, roboticist, and transhumanist from Las Vegas, who designs electronic and mechanical devices which encourage reflection regarding the human relationship with technology.

Their talk will be about a series of wearable augments built to facilitate in sensing, tracking, and indicating one’s level of excitement (or arousal)! Each of the wearables uses a variety of sensors as input to influence quirky electronic and mechanical devices of my design as output. The goal in doing so is not only to create a stellar suit of electronic armor (or amour), but also to help facilitate a dialogue about sex and intimacy amongst my peers that is relatable, honest, healthy, and fun.

Ryan Cousins is cofounder and CEO of krtkl inc. Based in Silicon Valley, krtkl (“critical”) makes life easier for companies developing heavily connected and automated products. Ryan earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering – with an emphasis in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics – from UCLA. He has worked in both R&D and business capacities across a variety of markets, including medical and embedded, and has been granted a European patent.

After years of working on embedded systems, product development, manufacturing, and startup-ing, Ryan has had the “pleasure” of experiencing nearly every type of failure a hardware business has to offer. Ryan will share some humorous – and horrifying – anecdotes from his arduous journey, along with some key takeaways that will (hopefully) prevent others from making the same mistakes.

After the talks, there will be demos, community announcements, and socializing. If you’d like to give a 2 minute demo/ community announcement, please see the organizers when you arrive to get set up.

A community announcement includes looking for a project partner, a job, offering a project/ job, the announcement of your startup launch, your Crowdfunding pitch, etc.

We’re looking forward to seeing you Thursday, July 12th, at 6:30pm!

SF Hardware meetup this week with Sarah Petkus