Designing a custom Trill flex sensor

Exciting announcement from the Bela team about a new flexible version of the Trill touch sensor:

Designing a custom flex sensor

Trill Flex brings flexible touch sensing to your maker projects. Trill Flex comes with a one-axis multitouch sensor printed on flexible PCB, but we designed this sensor to be detachable so you can create entirely custom sensors perfectly suited to your own projects.

In this tutorial we will create a custom 30-button flexible touchpad. You will learn how to set up a KiCad project and include the Trill design files, draw the pads, add a ground plane, and get your design ready to be printed. (Every purchase of Trill Flex comes with a unique discount code for $20 off flex PCB printing with our friends at OSHPark.com.)

Trill Flex is available now on the Bela shop

Designing a custom Trill flex sensor

Flexible battery tester

This flexible PCB is designed to a test battery like a CR2032 coincell. The board has cutouts to allow it to fold over the positive and negative terminals and, if the battery has a enough voltage, turn on a LED:

Flexible battery tester

Sensor Ring: a new project from Open Book creator Joey Castillo

Tom Fleets writes on Hackster about the latest prject form Open Book creator Joey Castillo:

The Newest Oddly Specific Object — the Sensor Ring — Shows Off the Latest Work From Joey Castillo!

Joey Castillo is one of those makers that not only seems to have a myriad projects continuously on the go, but also seems to actually make significant progress on them, rather than getting overwhelmed from juggling them in the air — something I’ve been known to end up doing…

With a striking resume of work that includes the Open Book, the Hiking Log, and even the more somber Big Board of Death, he’s no stranger to the pages at Hackster.io!

Keeping in following with Castillo’s focus on projects that monitor health metrics, his latest work tracks that theme perfectly, but also scales down the size of the hardware to something intended to fit within the form factor of a ring!

Sensor Ring: a new project from Open Book creator Joey Castillo

Greg Davill Sinks His Teeth Into ShArc

Tom Fleet writes on Hackster about Greg Davill’s latest adventure:

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Greg Davill Sinks His Teeth Into ShArc: A Geometric Technique for Multi-Bend/Shape Sensing.

The work of one such research project caught the eye of Greg Davill recently, when a paper written by Fereshteh Shahmiri and Paul H Dietz was published, after being submitted for the 2020 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2020).

This paper goes by the title of “ShArc:A Geometric Technique for Multi-Bend/Shape Sensing,’ and proposes a novel contour sensor, comprised of a flexible, capacitive PCB sensor, a suitable capacitance-to-digital converter, and some subsequent signal processing, allowing a two-layer polyamide FPC circuit to cleverly capture the contours of the shape it is stuck to.

That’s the operation in a nutshell, so why are we covering all this here on Hackster? Well, it’s all about accessibility! This research isn’t relegated to labs where we’ll never see sight of it, until commercialized into a product. Far from it. Davill has shown just how easily we here at home can play along with this project, using the same tools and services that we’d normally look at for our own hobby projects!

He’s not only managed to recreate the capacitance to digital converter needed for this application, but perhaps more of note, he’s even turned his hand to having a go at the flexible sensor electrodes themselves, all fabricated by the one stop shop, whose services seem to keep on growing— our favorite board fab house, OSH Park!

Greg Davill Sinks His Teeth Into ShArc

Atomized Annoy-O-Tron with Flex PCB

Been working on a tiny version of the Annoy-o-tron ThinkGeek’s prank device.

My design is based on Geppetto Electronics version from tindie… https://www.tindie.com/products/nsayer/annoy-o-tron-tiny/

My version is just over 0.25in round.. so tiny! Even found a tiny piezo to go with it and 3d printed a holder for 2 watch batteries and PCB.

via Atomized Annoy-O-Tron — AtomSoftTech

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RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

We were exited to see this use of a flex PCB to create a backplane for the RC2014:

RC2014 is a simple 8 bit Z80 based modular computer originally built to run Microsoft BASIC. It is inspired by the home built computers of the late 70s and computer revolution of the early 80s. It is not a clone of anything specific, but there are suggestions of the ZX81, UK101, S100, Superboard II and Apple I in here. It nominally has 8K ROM, 32K RAM, runs at 7.3728MHz and communicates over serial at 115,200 baud.

RC2014 backplane constructed with flex PCB

AtomSoft uses flex for tiny DimeDuino

From the AtomSoftTech blog:

DimeDuino

This time around i give you the DimeDuino. Its a Flex PCB based which utilizes the ATMEGA328P. Using this MCU allows for the installation of the Arduino bootloader. Hence the Duino in the name. These will come pre-programmed with the bootloader. One portion of the circle is just for programming. There is a GND, VCC,RXI, TXO and DTR & RST depending on your programmer.

As soon as its available ill post it here and on Twitter.

Specs:

  • Atmega328 running at 3.3v/8MHz or 5v/16MHz
  • Power LED (Green)
  • User LED (D13– Color may vary but mainly Blue)
  • Reset Button
  • 3.3v(AP2112K) or 5v (AP7335A) Linear step down
  • Flash 32KB (2KB is Bootloader)
  • SRAM 2KB
  • EEPROM 1KB
  • 20 I/O Pins (A6 & A7 are not used here. Input Only anyway)
    • 1 UART D0 (RX) and D1 (TX)
    • 1 SPI D10 (SS), D11 (MOSI), D12 (MISO), D13 (SCK)
    • 1 I2C A4 (SDA) and A5 (SCL)
    • 6 PWM D3, D5, D6, D9, D10, and D11
    • 14 I/O D0-D13

 

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Custom Portable N64 Embraces Modern Making

zeldaportable_feat

In the beginning, there was hot glue. Plus some tape, and a not inconsiderable amount of Bondo. In general, building custom portable game consoles a decade or so in the past was just a bit…messier than it is today. But with all the incredible tools and techniques the individual hardware hacker now has at their disposal, modern examples are pushing the boundaries of DIY.

This Zelda: Ocarina of Time themed portable N64 by [Chris Downing] is a perfect example. While the device is using a legitimate N64 motherboard, nearly every other component has been designed and manufactured specifically for this application. The case has been FDM 3D printed on a Prusa i3, the highly-detailed buttons were printed in resin on a Form 3, and several support PCBs and interface components made the leap from digital designs to physical objects thanks to the services of OSH Park.

zeldaportable_detailA custom made FFC to relocate the cartridge port.

Today, those details are becoming increasingly commonplace in the projects we see. But that’s sort of the point. In the video after the break, [Chris] breaks down the evolution of his portable consoles from hacked and glued together monstrosities (we mean that in the nicest way possible) to the sleek and professional examples like his latest N64 commission. But this isn’t a story of one maker’s personal journey through the ranks, it’s about the sort of techniques that have become available to the individual over the last decade.

Case in point, custom flexible flat cables (FFC). As [Chris] explains, when you wanted to relocate the cartridge slot on a portable console in the past, it usually involved tedious point-to-point wiring. Now, with the low-volume production capabilities offered by companies like OSH Park, you can have your own flexible cables made that are neater, faster to install, and far more reliable.

Projects like this one, along with other incredible creations from leaders in the community such as [GMan] are changing our perceptions of what a dedicated individual is capable of. There’s no way to be sure what the state-of-the-art will look like in another 5 or 10 years, but we’re certainly excited to find out.

via Custom Portable N64 Embraces Modern Making — Hackaday

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N64 Portable, Zelda Style!

From the Downing’s Basement blog:

Project 15: My Latest N64 Portable, Zelda Style!

I wish I could say that it hasn’t been two years since this project was commissioned…I also wish I could say this wasn’t the second time the job was completed…but if I didn’t have too, this beauty would have never existed. Kinda funny how that works.

But that said, after two years since the original agreement and a total remake of the original failure, Project 15 has come to light in the most beautiful portable console I’ve ever made. But not only has this been a technical achievement for me in many respects, but I’m very proud of the video I’ve made to accompany it.

You don’t have to scroll down very far in past posts to see what prompted this rebuild but at this point I can honestly say I’m glad it happened!

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And on the subject of reliability, low volume FFC PCB’s have become available through services like OSH Park which have allowed some very time and space saving options that do wonders for the assembly.

Read more…

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Learn more about Flexible PCBs

We are very excited to that more and more of our customers are discovering our flexible PCB service and how it can benefit their projects.

Insulectro’s Chris Hunrath joined Royal Circuits in a recent webinar that dives into the details of Flexible PCBs:

Learn more about Flexible PCBs