USB Interruptor

Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen designed this board to momentarily disconnect a USB device:

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USB Interruptor

This simple board plugs inline with a USB cable. It always passes the 5V power and normally passes the USB data signals. But when you press the button, the USB data signals are momentarily disconnected.
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For the last few months I’ve been developing a USB Host Library for powerful but complex EHCI USB port in Teensy 3.6 [..] Reaching over to physically unplug the USB cable gets old quickly! Really, really old, both hands off my keyboard… right when trying to focus [..]  I made this handy little board with a proper USB 2.0 high speed mux chip. The control signal is just 3.3V logic, so I might even wire it up to something to automate the process.
PaulStoffregen has shared the board on OSH Park:

USB Interruptor

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USB Interruptor

Star Trek Communicator Badge

Joe Crop is a creating a real life version of this famous sci-fi device:

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Star Trek Communicator Badge

In the true spirit of Star Trek, this communicator badge is completely autonomous, while fitting in the form factor of an original badge

Star Trek was known for dreaming up technology that was deemed nearly impossible given the limitations of the technology for the day. Having a small badge that could send audio across vast distances seemed out of the realm of possibility during the late 1980’s. This project’s aim is to use modern technology to provide nearly all the features of visionary tech, namely:

– Tap to connect and communicate instantly
– Long range (from orbit to planet surface)
– Small form factor (of an original TNG badge)
– Fully autonomous (no cell phone or base station needed)
– No external power source (i.e. battery powered)

joecrop has shared the board on OSH Park:

Star Trek Communicator v2p1

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Star Trek Communicator Badge

Smaller version of GameBoy Zero

moosepr designed this small and simple GameBoy-style device using the Raspberry Pi Zero:

7352071488543051372.jpgGameBoy Zero, but smaller!

I’m not overly fond of ‘rats nest’ wires, and I have a bit of an obsession with making things as small as possible, so this is what I came up with.

Tis just an ILI9341 screen, a Pi Zero, 2 navi switches (5 way), and a battery (with charge/protect circuit)

petay has shared the board on OSH Park:

GBz

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Here the board is in action:

 

Smaller version of GameBoy Zero

Chronio DIY Watch

 writes on Hackaday:

Chronio DIY Watch: Slick and Low Power

[Max K] has been testing the battery life of his self-designed watch under real-world conditions. Six months later, the nominally 3 V, 160 mAh CR2025 cell is reading 2.85 V, so the end is near, but that’s quite a feat for a home-engineered smart watch

Chronio DIY Watch

Ladder board for simple Automation

chmod775 designed this compact, standalone board to be programmed with a simple visual language:270681483106954815.jpg

Focus

Focus born with the purpose of making a prototype board that simplify every aspect of programming.

Spent the last hour writing down the main concept of the Visual Programming Language for the Focus!  It’s just a simple sketch, but I wanted to share it with you the main reason why I’m building it.

Ladder board for simple Automation

Snowbot

Dan Hienzsch a holiday project to build a little Snowbot with an adjustable speed larson scanner for an eye:

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Snowbot Ornament Project

When I started thinking of this project, I wanted to make something that included a bit of the basics and something more advanced. It had to be battery powered, and most importantly, I wanted to make sure it went against the grain of everything needing a microcontroller. Thus Snowbot was born.

Photos from the Hackaday.io project:

RheingoldHeavy has shared the board on OSH Park:

Snowbot_2015_Rev1

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Snowbot

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE

Ted Yapo is designing a display for his  LED Oscilloscope Mk. II and decided to automate the process:

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16×32 Display Design

I painstakingly drew the schematic for 512 LEDs in this display, then endured the drudgery of laying out the board. The whole process took about 45 seconds. Yes, I wrote a few Eagle User Language Programs (ULPs) (elapsed time after the scripts were written and debugged). The previous time I wrote one was last century to lay out a circular LED clock face. I figured it was about time I regained those skills.

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The EAGLE ULPs are on GitHub:

led-matrix-generator

 Eagle scripts for LED matrix display generation

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE