Apertus SMT workshop at Maker Faire Berlin

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The Apertus° open source cinema team will be running a Surface Mount Technology (SMT) workshop at Maker Faire Berlin this weekend in their AXIOM booth #121:

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Surface Mount Technology (SMT) Workshop

In the course of attending a lot of fairs and exhibitions, we’ve noticed that our cameras and components attract the attention of people from all walks of life. We’ve found that despite our reassurances, people discovering the world of Open Hardware tend to doubt their capabilities where soldering tiny components by hand is concerned.

 

This is why we hold Surface Mount Technology workshops – so that with a little confidence, the right tools and some initial guidance from members of our team, anyone can have great fun learning to make their own PCBs. The workshops are very popular and we have visitors designing pendants and earrings with colour LEDs and blinking patterns – which always creates a buzzing atmosphere.

 

apertus has shared the boards on OSH Park:

ART Base

art-base

Order from OSH Park

ART Tear

art-tear
Order from OSH Park

ART Star

art-star

Order from OSH Park

ART Diamond

art-diamond

Order from OSH Park

 

Apertus SMT workshop at Maker Faire Berlin

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

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Crazy Circuits: Unique STEM Projects Delivered Monthly

Create fun STEM and STEAM electronics projects with parts delivered to your door.

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Crazy Circuits is a non-soldering electronic learning platform that allows people to create circuits from almost any material they can imagine. Crazy Circuits are designed to pop onto LEGO™ bricks, enabling your LEGO™ creations to shine, move, and make noise. Use Crazy Circuits to construct paper crafts with conductive tape, use conductive thread for sewing, and create art with conductive inks and paints. You can even program sketches with Arduino compatible Crazy Circuits boards. No matter what you want to build, Crazy Circuits brings it all together.

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebots are great because no coding is required – they’re completely analog circuits that just go! But if you wanted them to go in a specific direction, how would you do that? Facelesstech has released their design for a light-following bristlebot that uses two LDRs to drive either side of the bristlebot (so you could turn it, somewhat – see video below for demo!). It’s pretty simple and pretty clever.

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

 

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

$3 Tinusaur board on IndieGoGo

Neven Boyanov has launched a new Tinusaur campaign on IndieGoGo:

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Small microcontroller board that could run Arduino and help you learn, teach others and make things

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The Tinusaur is powered by the Atmel ATtiny85 microcontroller.

We want to bring the cost down to $3 for the basic “lite” boards
and allow more people to be able to get them.

$3 Tinusaur board on IndieGoGo

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Last week we’ve launched our Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign and, as of a few minutes ago, we’ve reached 1/3-rd of our goal already. In case you’re not familiar what the Tinusaur project is about … A small board with a tiny chip on it that comes as an assembly kit – a small package with parts and you […]

via Indiegogo Campaign is Almost Halfway Through — The Tinusaur

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the…

via Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web — Hackaday

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017

2016 has been a great year! Over 20 workshops, lectures, seminars, courses. One Indiegogo campaign. Hundreds of people started using the Tinusaur platform. So, what’s next? Our Q1 goal: Launch new Indiegogo campaign in February to produce 1000 Tinusaur kits and bring the cost down to $2 per basic kit. This will make our boards […]

via Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017 — The Tinusaur

Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017