Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

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Crazy Circuits: Unique STEM Projects Delivered Monthly

Create fun STEM and STEAM electronics projects with parts delivered to your door.

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Crazy Circuits is a non-soldering electronic learning platform that allows people to create circuits from almost any material they can imagine. Crazy Circuits are designed to pop onto LEGO™ bricks, enabling your LEGO™ creations to shine, move, and make noise. Use Crazy Circuits to construct paper crafts with conductive tape, use conductive thread for sewing, and create art with conductive inks and paints. You can even program sketches with Arduino compatible Crazy Circuits boards. No matter what you want to build, Crazy Circuits brings it all together.

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebots are great because no coding is required – they’re completely analog circuits that just go! But if you wanted them to go in a specific direction, how would you do that? Facelesstech has released their design for a light-following bristlebot that uses two LDRs to drive either side of the bristlebot (so you could turn it, somewhat – see video below for demo!). It’s pretty simple and pretty clever.

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

 

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

$3 Tinusaur board on IndieGoGo

Neven Boyanov has launched a new Tinusaur campaign on IndieGoGo:

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Small microcontroller board that could run Arduino and help you learn, teach others and make things

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The Tinusaur is powered by the Atmel ATtiny85 microcontroller.

We want to bring the cost down to $3 for the basic “lite” boards
and allow more people to be able to get them.

$3 Tinusaur board on IndieGoGo

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Last week we’ve launched our Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign and, as of a few minutes ago, we’ve reached 1/3-rd of our goal already. In case you’re not familiar what the Tinusaur project is about … A small board with a tiny chip on it that comes as an assembly kit – a small package with parts and you […]

via Indiegogo Campaign is Almost Halfway Through — The Tinusaur

Learn, Teach and Make with the Tinusaur

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the…

via Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web — Hackaday

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017

2016 has been a great year! Over 20 workshops, lectures, seminars, courses. One Indiegogo campaign. Hundreds of people started using the Tinusaur platform. So, what’s next? Our Q1 goal: Launch new Indiegogo campaign in February to produce 1000 Tinusaur kits and bring the cost down to $2 per basic kit. This will make our boards […]

via Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017 — The Tinusaur

Moving forward with the Tinusaur Project in 2017

Acrylic Solenoid Engine

Extreme Electronics designed this easy-to-build solenoid engine:

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I’ve always loved solenoid engines. The first one I built was many,many years ago out of Mechano. Many others have followed since, But they always ran badly and only for a short while as the accuracy of the construction medium was poor. I am not a metal worker, making a “proper” engine out of cast pieces is out of my (and many other peoples) capabilities.

With modern laser cutting it is easy to make accurate components, it is relatively cheap and fairly quick.

So the Acrylic Solenoid Engine came into being

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The initial driver is using a small PIC 12F675 and and an IR detector to give me pulse timing information from the solenoid. I went the IR sensor route rather than a mechanical switch so there was no rubbing parts that could wear as acrylic is rather soft. To get a good timing signal aluminum foil is placed on one side of the flywheel to give a good reflection back to the IR emitter receiver pair on the PCB.

Acrylic Solenoid Engine