Designing PCBs for Assembly

Designing pcbs for assembly is easy, right? We just squirt all the footprints onto a board layout, connect all the traces, send out the gerbers and position files, and we’re done–right? Whoa, hold the phone, there, young rogue! Just like we can hack together some working source code with variables named after our best friends, we can also…

via Designing for Fab: a Heads-Up before Designing PCBs for Professional Assembly — Hackaday

Designing PCBs for Assembly

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen has shared a new project on OSH Park:

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

The Monolith Synth Project needed to use a large number of these LED lit arcade buttons.

Dimming of the LEDs was required. Initially I considered using this Adafruit 16 Channel PWM board. But the LEDs in these buttons have integrated resistors which require 12 volts, so 16 transistor circuits and another board for reading the switches would have also been needed.

It uses the same PCA9685 chip for 12 bit PWM control on every LED, with mosfet drivers to handle 12V outputs, and also a MCP23017 chip to read the buttons. Every button has a discrete 1K pullup resistor (rather than using the higher impedance on-chip pullups) to help with use in the same cable bundles cross coupling to 12V PWM signals.

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Order from OSH Park

Monolith Synth

Four of these boards where used in the Monolith Synth project:

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The project is featured in this Tested video:

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

Hack Your Hot Air Station

It used to be hot air soldering gear was exotic, but not anymore. There are plenty of relatively inexpensive choices. Many of these appear to be the same despite having different brand names and model numbers. One that is common and inexpensive is the 858D. These run about $50. [Gabse] has one and decided to…

via Hack Your Hot Air Station — Hackaday

Hack Your Hot Air Station

Photos of Bring-A-Hack after Maker Faire Bay Area 2017

Thanks to everyone that came to Bring-A-Hack last weekend after Maker Faire Bay Area!  Here’s a gallery of photos:

Bring-A-Hack after Maker Faire Bay Area 2017

People were quite impressed by this soldering handiwork by Mike Szczys of Hackaday:

Mike also did a great job tweeting about all the wonderful hacks such as this care-free robot:

Follow #bringahack on Twitter to see more!

Photos of Bring-A-Hack after Maker Faire Bay Area 2017

CPLDuino

Jeremy g. designed a mashup between an Arduino Uno and a Xilinx 9536XL CPLD:

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CPLDuino

The XCACDV3, CPLDuino is a single board solution to meld Atmels ATmega 328 RISC microcontroller with a Xilinx XC9536XL1 CPLD. Allowing for rapid prototyping of digital circuits without the need for a breadboard. The CPLDuino is capable of passing information from the on board ATMega328 to the CPLD and vice versa, allowing for real-time data monitoring. Thanks to the on-board CP2102 USB to Serial UART, data can be viewed and manipulated via the virtual com port.

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CPLDuino

KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management

One common complaint we hear from most new KiCAD users relates to schematic and footprint libraries. The trick is to use just one schematic symbol and footprint library each with your project. This way any changes to the default schematic libraries will not affect your project and it will be easy to share your project with others without breaking…

via KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management — Hackaday

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KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management