3D Printing A Synthesizer


From Brian Benchoff on Hackaday:

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Before there were samplers, romplers, Skrillex, FM synths, and all the other sounds that don’t fit into the trailer for the new Blade Runner movie, electronic music was simple. Voltage controlled oscillators, voltage controlled filters, and CV keyboards ruled the roost. We’ve gone over a lot of voltage controlled synths, but [Tommy] took it to the next level. He designed a small, minimum viable synth based around the VCO in an old 4046 PLL chip

The circuit for this synth is built in two halves. The biggest, and what probably took the most time designing, is the key bed. This is a one-octave keyboard that’s completely 3D printed. We’ve seen something like this before in one of the projects from the SupplyFrame Design Lab residents, though while that keyboard worked it was necessary for [Tim], the creator of that project, to find a company that could make custom key beds for him.

Read more on the F0 on Tommy’s blog:

Hello, F0

Say hello to the F0: a minimalist, analog, square wave synthesizer.

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

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Darcy Neal will lead a workshop in Chicago on building your own synthesizer:

Build a Synthesizer with artist Darcy Neal

Saturday, Apr 15, 2017, 2:00 PM

Pumping Station: One
3519 North Elston Avenue Chicago, IL

2 members Attending

Artist Darcy Neal leads this workshop on building your own synthesizer. Read below for her description:We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added component…

Check out this Meetup →

We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added components. Participants will learn to solder together their own prototyping PCB, build a circuit on a breadboard from a schematic, experiment with sensors, and learn the basics about how to produce custom circuit boards using design software like Kicad and Fritzing. No experience is necessary, but basic electronic knowledge or a strong interest in synths will be helpful.

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

Making a USB DAC + Headphone Amp [update]

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It’s been a while since I last wrote *ahem* lies *cough* on this project. I am currently a little bit torn whether I should keep writing it here or start posting to my new hackaday.io presence… Anyway here is a brief update: TL;DR I now have a working standalone unit — USB in, headphone out […]

via Making Myself a USB DAC + Headphone Amp — Interim Update — Frog in the Well

Making a USB DAC + Headphone Amp [update]

Sega Genesis Chiptune Synthesizer

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Jarek Lupinski created this board that uses the actual Sega Genesis sound chips to play chiptune files:

Sega Genesis Native Hardware Chiptune Synthesizer

The VGM file format stores instructions for sound chips, and VGM files for many popular games can be found online. An Atmega1284p microcontroller will read these VGM files from an SD card and translate them into signals to send to the onboard YM2612 and SN76489 chips. These chips were used by the original Sega Genesis hardware to make the sound effects and music in Genesis games.

Sega Genesis Chiptune Synthesizer