3D Printing A Synthesizer


From Brian Benchoff on Hackaday:

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Before there were samplers, romplers, Skrillex, FM synths, and all the other sounds that don’t fit into the trailer for the new Blade Runner movie, electronic music was simple. Voltage controlled oscillators, voltage controlled filters, and CV keyboards ruled the roost. We’ve gone over a lot of voltage controlled synths, but [Tommy] took it to the next level. He designed a small, minimum viable synth based around the VCO in an old 4046 PLL chip

The circuit for this synth is built in two halves. The biggest, and what probably took the most time designing, is the key bed. This is a one-octave keyboard that’s completely 3D printed. We’ve seen something like this before in one of the projects from the SupplyFrame Design Lab residents, though while that keyboard worked it was necessary for [Tim], the creator of that project, to find a company that could make custom key beds for him.

Read more on the F0 on Tommy’s blog:

Hello, F0

Say hello to the F0: a minimalist, analog, square wave synthesizer.

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Teensy: TDM Support For Many-Channel Audio I/O

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Paul Stoffregen posted an update in his Teensy Audio Library on Hackaday.io:

TDM Support, For Many-Channel Audio I/O

Some projects need a lot of audio I/O. Maybe you’re doing positional audio sound effects (using the 8-tap delay effect) where ordinary stereo or even 5 channel “surround” isn’t enough? Maybe you’re making the ultimate Eurorack synthesizer module? Or you just want a lot of signals, because you can!

Here’s a board for the Cirrus Logic CS42448 chip, which provides 6 inputs and 8 outputs. All are high quality audio, and all work simultaneously.

PaulStoffregen has shared the board on OSH Park:

CS42448 Audio, 6 Inputs, 8 Outputs

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Teensy: TDM Support For Many-Channel Audio I/O

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

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Darcy Neal will lead a workshop in Chicago on building your own synthesizer:

Build a Synthesizer with artist Darcy Neal

Saturday, Apr 15, 2017, 2:00 PM

Pumping Station: One
3519 North Elston Avenue Chicago, IL

2 members Attending

Artist Darcy Neal leads this workshop on building your own synthesizer. Read below for her description:We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added component…

Check out this Meetup →

We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added components. Participants will learn to solder together their own prototyping PCB, build a circuit on a breadboard from a schematic, experiment with sensors, and learn the basics about how to produce custom circuit boards using design software like Kicad and Fritzing. No experience is necessary, but basic electronic knowledge or a strong interest in synths will be helpful.

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

SoundBeacon

Patrick Van Oosterwijck created an audio BLE beacon that can be activated by the vision impaired to find exact locations of doorways, bus stops, crosswalks, and more:

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SoundBeacon

The idea is that a blind person uses a navigation app, and can query to see “what is around”. In the list of beacons that are around, they can tap the one they want to know the location of and it will start to produce an audible signal for a short time.

The BLE module is configured as an iBeacon and allows connections. It has a battery service and an “Immediate Alert” (AKA “Find me”) service.

Patrick used the following to build the prototype:

  • A 550 mAh 3.2 V LiFePO4 cell
  • A #LiFePO4wered/Solar1 prototype to charge the battery
  • A 5.5V, 0.6W monocrystalline solar cell
  • A Silicon Labs (formerly BlueGiga) BLE113 module
  • A beeper that works very badly (better solution needed)
  • And a IP65 enclosure

xorbit has shared the booster for loud piezo beeper on OSH Park:

PiezoBoost

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SoundBeacon

Musical Toothbrush by Joe Grand

Hackaday wrote about a nifty hack by Joe Grand:

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[Joe Grand’s] Toothbrush Plays Music That Doesn’t Suck

It’s not too exciting that [Joe Grand] has a toothbrush that plays music inside your head. That’s actually a trick that the manufacturer pulled off. It’s that [Joe] gave his toothbrush an SD card slot for music that doesn’t suck. The victim donor hardware for this project is a toothbrush meant for kids called Tooth Tunes.…

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Joe published full documentation for the project on his website:

The PCB is shared on OSH Park:

Tooth Tunes Hack

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Joe describes the project in this video:

Hear the toothbrush in action:

Musical Toothbrush by Joe Grand

XMOS-based USB to I2S bridge

An update from the USB DAC + Headphone Amp project by Yin Zhong (summivox):

USB Interface

Months into the project and I was still amazed at the lack of availability of a class of ASICs: USB-I2S bridges. Well I just lied — if you are fine with USB 1.1 and USB Audio Class (UAC) 1.0, which severely limits your (bit depth × resolution × channel count)

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So I kept looking for ASICs, and I found one that is close enough: XMOS XHRA-2HPA. It even comes with a reference design that does exactly what I want!

summivox has shared the board on OSH Park:

20161229-1609 headphone-USB-v2.0.zip

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XMOS-based USB to I2S bridge