Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

RasmusB on Hackaday.io is resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA:

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Psioπ

Bringing a Psion Series 5 into this decade by replacing all the important bits.

The completed result will (hopefully) be a portable modern Linux system with all the connectivity options expected in a modern device.

The keyboard adapter board is available on Tindie:

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USB keyboard adapter for Psion Series 5 keyboards

This is an USB interface for Psion series 5 PDA keyboards. Plug in a keyboard and a USB cable, and use it with any modern computer!

The design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smallRasmusB/PsioPi

Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Bob Baddeley writes on Hackaday:

Giant Solderless LEGO NES Controller Gives Everyone Tiny Hands

[BrownDogGadgets] built a giant NES controller out of LEGO. The controller is designed in LEGO Digital Designer, which lets you create a virtual model, then get a full list of parts which can be ordered online.

The electronics are based on a Teensy LC programmed to appear as a USB keyboard, and the buttons are standard push buttons. The insides are wired together with nylon conductive tape. LEGO was an appropriate choice because the Teensy and switches are built on top of LEGO compatible PCBs, so components are just snapped in place. The system is called Crazy Circuits and is a pretty neat way to turn electronics into a universal and reusable system.

Here is the controller in action:

Design files and source code for Crazy Circuits modules and projects are available on GitHub:

github-smallBrownDogGadgets/CrazyCircuits

Find out more in our previous blog post:

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Using Si7006 to read temperature and humidity

From the bitknitting blog:

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Using the Si7006 to get temperature and humidity readings

I made a PCB with the Si7006 on it. This post is my bumblings encountered as I successfully got temperature and humidity readings from a Si7006 using the PCB I designed. In summary, the Si7006 is easy to work with. It is relatively easy to solder and very easy to access via I2C […]

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The design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smallBitKnitting/TheLeafSpa

 

Using Si7006 to read temperature and humidity

E-Paper Breakout Board for Teensy

Breakout board designed in KiCad to connect Pervasive Displays 2.15″ E-Paper (E2215CS062) to Teensy 3.2 or Teensy LC. Based Teensy E-Paper Shield by Jarek Lupinski in EAGLE.

My goal is to create a name badge I can wear at conferences and Maker Faires. This was first step to verify the KiCad schematic and KiCad footprints work. I will post more information as the badge project progresses.

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KiCad PCB design files:

The board is shared on OSH Park:

E-Paper Breakout Board for Teensy

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Order from OSH Park

Bill of Materials (BoM)

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Source Code

  • uses EPD215 Arduino Library by Jarek Lupinski for his E-paper Teensy Shield
  • requires pinout modification:

Photos

Video

Related: Jarek’s ePaper Teensy shield

E-Paper Breakout Board for Teensy

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

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Darcy Neal will lead a workshop in Chicago on building your own synthesizer:

Build a Synthesizer with artist Darcy Neal

Saturday, Apr 15, 2017, 2:00 PM

Pumping Station: One
3519 North Elston Avenue Chicago, IL

2 members Attending

Artist Darcy Neal leads this workshop on building your own synthesizer. Read below for her description:We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added component…

Check out this Meetup →

We’ll learn about some of the building blocks of creating a synthesizer using the 4046 VCO and the classic 40106 CMOS ICs. The 4046 is a well documented and powerful IC that can be turned into a modular synth voice with just a few added components. Participants will learn to solder together their own prototyping PCB, build a circuit on a breadboard from a schematic, experiment with sensors, and learn the basics about how to produce custom circuit boards using design software like Kicad and Fritzing. No experience is necessary, but basic electronic knowledge or a strong interest in synths will be helpful.

Build a Synthesizer with Darcy Neal in Chicago

Rotary Encoder Breakout with Pull-up Resistors

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This breakout board designed in KiCad makes it easy to put a rotary encoder and pull-up resistors on a breadboard.  (Thanks to Enrico for the idea to add pull-up resistors).  The footprints on the back are meant for 1206 SMD resistors.  I choose 1K Ohm resistors, marked 102, when I assembled this board.

Additional photos are available in the GitHub repo’s images directory and in a Google Photos gallery.

Here is the OSH Park shared project for the board:

Rotary Encoder Breakout with Pull-ups

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Order from OSH Park

The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

github-smallpdp7/rotary-encoder-breakout

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I used this KiCad symbol and footprint by Mike Cousins for a Sparkfun rotary encoder:

github-smallmcous/kicad-lib

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I’ve verified that these rotary encoders fit:

I wrote this Arduino sketch to run on the Teensy 3.2.  The brightness of one LED is controlled by the rotary encoder knob.  The other LED is turns on when the rotary encoder knob is pressed down:

arduino-smallrotary-encoder-test.ino

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Here’s a video of the breakout board being used with a Bourns PEC12R-4220F-S0024 and Teensy 3.2:

Rotary Encoder Breakout with Pull-up Resistors

Creating the Benchoff Nickel

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Andrew Sowa writes about the PCB he designed in KiCad to surprise Brian Benchoff last weekend at the Hackaday Unconference in Chicago:

Creating the Benchoff Nickel

I thought of making the Benchoff nickel after I saw Brian’s Hackaday,io profile. He has a hi-res image of the center a Benchoff Buck which is well suited to being converted to a PCB. There is only a few colors and they have sharp edges. Bitmap2Component in Kicad, can easily detect these transitions and convert them into a footprint file. With the help of a text editor, I was able to manually layer everything into one complete image.

 

The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

screenshot-at-2017-02-14-20-58-40Junes-PhD/Benchoff-Nickel

 

Junes-PhD has shared the project on OSH Park:

Benchoff Nickel

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Order from OSH Park

Creating the Benchoff Nickel