Internet of Fidget Spinners

writes on Hackaday:

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Internet of Fidget Spinners

Last week, everyone on Hackaday.io was busy getting their four project logs and illustrations ready for the last call in this round of the Hackaday Prize. These projects are the best of what the Internet of Things has to offer because this is the Internet of Useful things [..]

This is a PoV fidget spinner, which means the leading edges of this tricorn spinner are bedazzled with APA102 LEDs. Persistence-of-vision toys are as old as Hackaday, and the entire idea of a fidget spinner is to spin, so this at least makes sense.

Find out more on the Hackaday.io project page by Matthias:

 

IoT POV Fidget Spinner

A WiFi fidget spinner, taken from concept to ordering parts in one weekend

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

githubm-byte/fidget-pov

Screenshot from 2017-06-10 14-39-57

matthias has shared the board on OSH Park:

IoT POV Fidget Spinner (192a97b)

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Order from OSH Park

Internet of Fidget Spinners

Design a Raspberry Pi add-on board with KiCad

Learn how to design a simple add-on board for Raspberry Pi with KiCad in 20 minutes with this new tutorial from Chris Gammell of Contextual Electronics:

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Shine On You Crazy KiCad

This course shows how to make a custom but very simple piece of electronics for the Raspberry Pi platform. The primary purpose is to get users building something in KiCad as fast as possible.

Shine on, you crazy KiCad

A post shared by Chris Gammell (@chrisgammell) on

The free course contains four videos:

Designing a PCB in KiCad in 20 minutes

Buying Components

Assembling a simple circuit board with SMD components

Writing code, blinking an LED with a Raspberry Pi

ChrisGammell has shared the board on OSH Park:

Shine

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Order from OSH Park

Design a Raspberry Pi add-on board with KiCad

KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management

One common complaint we hear from most new KiCAD users relates to schematic and footprint libraries. The trick is to use just one schematic symbol and footprint library each with your project. This way any changes to the default schematic libraries will not affect your project and it will be easy to share your project with others without breaking…

via KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management — Hackaday

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KiCAD Best Practices: Library Management

From Proof of Concept to Prototype

From the Rebooting Electronics blog by Steve Mayze:

From Proof of Concept to Prototype

In the last entry for the Timed LED Lighting Controller, I realised that there are no working examples of an I²C driver for the ATtiny20. I then had to work through the data sheet to implement my own. With that done, I could then start on the application firmware and get the board really working. So this is where my proof of concept becomes the prototype.

From Proof of Concept to Prototype

USB-C PD Buddy Sink

From Clayton G. Hobbs on Hackaday.io:

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PD Buddy Sink

USB Power Delivery for everyone

USB Power Delivery is a cool standard for getting lots of power—up to 100 W—from a USB Type-C port. Being an open standard for supplying enough power to charge phones, laptops, and just about anything else under the sun, USB PD is poised to greatly reduce the amount of e-waste produced worldwide from obsolete proprietary chargers. Unfortunately, like all USB standards, it’s quite complex, putting it out of reach of the average electronics hobbyist.

PD Buddy Sink solves this problem, letting any hacker or maker use USB PD in their projects. Think of it as a smart power jack. To use it, first configure a voltage and current via the USB configuration interface. Then whenever the Sink is plugged in to a USB PD power supply, it negotiates the power your project needs and provides it on the output connector.

The KiCad design files are available on his website:

pd-buddy-sink

USB-C PD Buddy Sink

Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

RasmusB on Hackaday.io is resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA:

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Psioπ

Bringing a Psion Series 5 into this decade by replacing all the important bits.

The completed result will (hopefully) be a portable modern Linux system with all the connectivity options expected in a modern device.

The keyboard adapter board is available on Tindie:

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USB keyboard adapter for Psion Series 5 keyboards

This is an USB interface for Psion series 5 PDA keyboards. Plug in a keyboard and a USB cable, and use it with any modern computer!

The design files and source code are available on GitHub:

github-smallRasmusB/PsioPi

Resurrecting a Psion Series 5 PDA

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller

Bob Baddeley writes on Hackaday:

Giant Solderless LEGO NES Controller Gives Everyone Tiny Hands

[BrownDogGadgets] built a giant NES controller out of LEGO. The controller is designed in LEGO Digital Designer, which lets you create a virtual model, then get a full list of parts which can be ordered online.

The electronics are based on a Teensy LC programmed to appear as a USB keyboard, and the buttons are standard push buttons. The insides are wired together with nylon conductive tape. LEGO was an appropriate choice because the Teensy and switches are built on top of LEGO compatible PCBs, so components are just snapped in place. The system is called Crazy Circuits and is a pretty neat way to turn electronics into a universal and reusable system.

Here is the controller in action:

Design files and source code for Crazy Circuits modules and projects are available on GitHub:

github-smallBrownDogGadgets/CrazyCircuits

Find out more in our previous blog post:

Crazy Circuits launches on Kickstarter

Giant Functional LEGO NES Controller