BeagleLogic Standalone featuring the Octavo SiP

Guest article written by  Kumar Abhishek on the Octavo Systems website:

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BeagleLogic Standalone – Featuring the OSD3358-SM

Three years ago, as a student under the Google Summer of Code program for BeagleBoard.org, I developed BeagleLogic – that turned the BeagleBone Black and its variants into a Logic Analyzer using the Programmable Real-Time Units (PRUs) on the AM335x SoC to capture up to 14 inputs up to 100 MSamples/sec. It is possible to fill up to 300MB of the 512MB DDR RAM in the BeagleBone with logic samples – that’s 3 seconds of data at 8 channels (1.5 secs at 16 channels). I also designed a cape for the system – called the BeagleLogic cape that would allow buffering the external logic signals up to 5V TTL so that they do not damage the BeagleBone.

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The launch of Octavo Systems and its OSD3358 SiP got me excited, and the idea of a turnkey version of BeagleLogic was rekindled as the design would be greatly simplified due to the SiP integrating the core components, leaving me to focus on the features I want to add to the system.

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From concept to completion, this project took 4 months working on it part-time. I relocated in August so work happened at an even slower pace during that month

The schematics were originally based on the OSD3358, however Jason encouraged me to design based on the newly announced OSD3358-SM as it was smaller and had a more optimized ballmap. The schematics were then migrated to the OSD3358-SM in late July. At the beginning of the routing exercise, I was really apprehensive if the design could be routed in 4 layers but thanks to the optimized ball map of the OSD3358-SM, the routing was easily completed so.

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BeagleLogic Standalone featuring the Octavo SiP

LoFive RISC-V board now on GroupGets

LoFive RISC-V dev board designed by Michael Welling with KiCad is now on GroupGets:

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LoFive is a small board based on the SiFive Freedom E310 open source SoC

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Specifications

  • MCU – SiFive Freedom E310 (FE310) 32-bit RV32IMAC processor @ up to 320+ MHz (1.61 DMIPS/MHz)
  • Storage – 128-Mbit SPI flash (ISSI IS25LP128)
  • Expansion – 2x 14-pin headers with JTAG, GPIO, PWM, SPI, UART, 5V, 3.3V and GND
  • Misc – 1x reset button, 16 MHz crystal
  • Power Supply – 5V via pin 1 on header; Operating Voltage: 3.3 V and 1.8 V
  • Dimensions – 38 x 18 mm (estimated)
  • License – CERN Open Hardware Licence v1.2

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The design files are available on GitHub:

mwelling/lofive

LoFive RISC-V board now on GroupGets

EasyPWR

From mcu_nerd on Hackaday.io:

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EasyPWR

A small, easy to assemble board that makes use of old wall warts.

 

Like many of us, I had a bunch of various wall-warts lying around, but sadly though none of them produced a regulated 5V/3.3V. I had some 78xx regulators around, so I went into KiCad and made a board to make those wall-warts useful! Changing the world by saving old wall warts from the dumpster!

EasyPWR

Building a PCB lapel

JinGen Lim created this beautiful project:

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Building a PCB lapel

I had little experience with fabric, but building a lapel out of PCB seemed like something that might just work. PCBs are typically built with extremely high tolerances for its copper and mask layers and still acceptably accurate for the silkscreen.

 

Building a PCB lapel

KiCad footprint for Nokia 5110 LCD

Sven Gregori on Hackaday.io created a KiCad component and footprint for the Nokia 5110 LCD and created this breakout board to test it:8695331498520943537

Yet another Nokia 5110 LCD breakout board

I just shamelessly measured all there was to measure and created my own KiCad PCB footprint, along with a schematic component.

Once done, I needed a way to verify it would actually work and fit the LCD, so despite how pointless it is, I created my own breakout board as proof of concept and ordered it from OSH Park.

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The Nokia 5110/3310 LCD component and footprint are available on GitHub:

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sgreg has shared the breakout board on OSH Park:

Nokia 5110 LCD Breakout Board Rev.A

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Order from OSH Park

KiCad footprint for Nokia 5110 LCD

Internet of Fidget Spinners

writes on Hackaday:

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Internet of Fidget Spinners

Last week, everyone on Hackaday.io was busy getting their four project logs and illustrations ready for the last call in this round of the Hackaday Prize. These projects are the best of what the Internet of Things has to offer because this is the Internet of Useful things [..]

This is a PoV fidget spinner, which means the leading edges of this tricorn spinner are bedazzled with APA102 LEDs. Persistence-of-vision toys are as old as Hackaday, and the entire idea of a fidget spinner is to spin, so this at least makes sense.

Find out more on the Hackaday.io project page by Matthias:

 

IoT POV Fidget Spinner

A WiFi fidget spinner, taken from concept to ordering parts in one weekend

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

githubm-byte/fidget-pov

Screenshot from 2017-06-10 14-39-57

matthias has shared the board on OSH Park:

IoT POV Fidget Spinner (192a97b)

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Order from OSH Park

Internet of Fidget Spinners