Hackaday: Making More Of Me Money

Brian Benchoff of Hackaday writes about a surprise PCB he received at the Hackady Unconference in Chicago last weekend:

Making More Of Me Money

For the last few years, Hackaday has really been stepping up our game with marketing materials. Our t-shirts and swag are second to none, and last year we introduced the ‘Benchoff Buck’ [..]

Andrew Sowa created the Benchoff Nickel. It’s a visage of yours truly emblazoned on a PCB, rendered in FR4, silkscreen, gold, and OSHPark’s royal purple.

The Benchoff Nickel was created in KiCad using the Bitmap2Component functionality. Planning this required a little bit of work; there are only five colors you can get on an OSH Park PCB, from white to gold to beige to purple (soldermask on top of copper) to black (soldermask with no copper). Luckily, the best picture we have of me renders very well in five colors.

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Hackaday: Making More Of Me Money

DTV Tuner Breakout for SDR

Eric Brombaugh designed this breakout board for the Rafael Microelectronics R820T2 Advanced Digital TV Silicon Tuner chip:

r820t2_breakout_assembled

R820T2 Breakout

This is the same chip used in most all of the RTL-SDR dongles, as well as the Airspy and numerous other radios. The chip is a versatile front-end with reasonable sensitivity and wide tuning range.

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The design presented here is almost an exact implementation of the Mfg’s suggested demo design from the datasheet, implemented on the OSHpark 4-layer PCB process and provides a simple 4-pin interface with power, ground and I2C bus for controlling the tuner. A broad-band RF input and 10MHz IF output are provided on SMA connectors.

The breakout PCB design and STM32F0 firmware for the Rafael R820T2 tuner chip are shared on GitHub:

screenshot-at-2017-02-14-20-58-40 emeb/r820t2

 

emeb has shared project on OSH Park:

r820t2_breakout v0.1

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DTV Tuner Breakout for SDR

ISL12022M RTC breakout board

From the Pluxx’s Magitech Golem Parts Emporium blog:

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ISL12022M RTC breakout board

This is a breakout board for the Intersil ISL12022M real-time clock, with optional I²C pull-ups and a CR1225 backup battery. The circuit is based on the design recommended by Intersil, with a few tweaks. It’s the second board I’ve designed so far.

golemparts has shared the project on OSH Park:

ISL12022M RTC Breakout v1.0 A

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ISL12022M RTC breakout board

Snowbot

Dan Hienzsch a holiday project to build a little Snowbot with an adjustable speed larson scanner for an eye:

snowbot_v1_prototype-2

Snowbot Ornament Project

When I started thinking of this project, I wanted to make something that included a bit of the basics and something more advanced. It had to be battery powered, and most importantly, I wanted to make sure it went against the grain of everything needing a microcontroller. Thus Snowbot was born.

Photos from the Hackaday.io project:

RheingoldHeavy has shared the board on OSH Park:

Snowbot_2015_Rev1

snowbot_revised_silkscreen_preview

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Snowbot

SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breakout Board

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I designed this simple breakout board in KiCad to make it easier to put a rotary encoder on a breadboard.   The KiCad symbol and footprint for the SparkFun rotary encoder was created by mcous on GitHub.  I used an updated version with corrected pin numbering.

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Bill of Materials:

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The design files are available on GitHub:

Screenshot at 2017-02-14 20-58-40.png pdp7/rotary-encoder-breakout

The board is shared on OSH Park:

SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breadboard Adapter

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SparkFun Rotary Encoder Breakout Board

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

Bristlebots are great because no coding is required – they’re completely analog circuits that just go! But if you wanted them to go in a specific direction, how would you do that? Facelesstech has released their design for a light-following bristlebot that uses two LDRs to drive either side of the bristlebot (so you could turn it, somewhat – see video below for demo!). It’s pretty simple and pretty clever.

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

 

Bristlebot with LDRs Becomes Light-Following Bristlebot

KiCad at FOSDEM 2017

KiCad project leader Wayne Stambaugh talked at FOSDEM 2017 about KiCad’s current status and future roadmap:

KiCad Project Status

Wayne’s slides are available on Google Drive:

Screenshot at 2017-02-14 05-47-37.png

Tomasz Wlostowski of CERN talks about the SPICE integration that was added to KiCad in 2016:

Integrated Spice Simulation

 

Maciej Sumiński walked through the KiCad source code:

Diving into the KiCad source code

PDF of the slides is available for download:
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KiCad at FOSDEM 2017