The Hacker Village of Supercon

I’m utterly exhausted and still in a state of awe. The Hackaday Superconference has grown in so many ways, but one thing remains the same: the spirit of the Hacker Village — an intangible feeling that grows up around all who attend — is bliss to take part in. There’s really no substitute for having…

via The Hacker Village of Supercon — Hackaday

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The Hacker Village of Supercon

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

RAMPS compatible driver module based on DRV8818 by Dean Gouramanis:

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DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

The goal of this project is to fit the DRV8818 driver circuit onto the standard 0.8″ X 0.6″ PCB size used in RAMPS 3D printers. DRV8825 drivers are a popular choice for desktop 3D printers, because they can provide up to 2.5 amps peak current. The DRV8818 is a similar IC capable of driving up to 3.5 amps, but the circuit is too large to fit on PCB using regular methods. Also, without a propper heatsink it will overheat.

Schematic, gerbers and mechanical CAD files are shared on GitHub:

dgouramanis/T18_driver

 
DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

Tiny ESP32 board from the store on Tindie with optional battery header and pSRAM:

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Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

It’s a little ESP32 Board. Perfect for controlling or sensing stuff in the real world and sync it to the internet! Despite that it features the ESP32 WROVER Module. This means it got 4MB FLASH and 4MB RAM. That’s an absolute incredible amount of RAM. I honestly have no clue for what I will ever need 4MB in my embedded Projects.

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Why did you make it?

I wanted a small ESP32 Board with the pSRAM and which works and doesn’t eat your whole time to get it working and find it’s issues and quirks.

I’ve used the CP2102 Serial converter because this is the one, which works the best way to program the ESP32. Even Espressif uses this serial converter on their own dev boards.

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What makes it special?

It’s propably the smallest ESP32 Board with pSRAM. Despite the size it’s ideal for battery operation. It uses under 200uA in Deep Sleep mode!

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Tiny ESP32 WROVER pSRAM board

High Speed Data Acquisition Chat

Kumar Abhishek, creator of the BeagleLogic Standalone, will be hosting a Hackaday HackChat on Friday, November 17th:

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High Speed Data Acquisition Chat

This Hack Chat is at 9:30a PST, Friday, November 17th.

This chat is about data acquisition. Data acquisition (DAQ) is a process by which a signal such as voltage, current, temperature, pressure, or sound is measured with a processing system. A processing system can be an entire computer or a standalone chip. The goal of a good DAQ system is to provide accuracy as quickly and be as cost effective as possible.

Kumar [Abhishek] is an engineering graduate from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, India, whose journey into the world of hardware began when he picked up the soldering iron at the age of 7. As a student under the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program under BeagleBoard.org, [Abhishek] worked with BeagleBoard.org to realize a logic analyzer using the Programmable Real-Time units on the BeagleBone, called BeagleLogic. He has also served as a Summer of Code mentor for BeagleBoard.org.

In this chat, we’ll be discussing:

  • The PRUs on the BeagleBone series of hardware, and their capabilities
  • How BeagleLogic uses the PRUs to perform data acquisition
  • Ways to program the PRUs
  • (Ways of) processing the data acquired from the PRUs
High Speed Data Acquisition Chat

Arduino Neural Network Robot

Sean Hodgins created an Arduino-based robot that avoids light by navigating using a neural network:
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This project is meant to teach about utilizing neural networks in robotic platforms. There will be a 3 part video series on the Make YouTube channel on building the robot. It will start with prototyping and design, then move onto assembly and testing, and finally programming and running the neural network. You will be able to follow along and make your own robot in the end.

Part 2: Soldering and Assembly

 

 

Arduino Neural Network Robot

Open Source Underwater Glider Wins 2017 Hackaday Prize

The Open Source Underwater Glider has just been named the Grand Prize winner of the 2017 Hackaday Prize. As the top winner of the Hackaday Prize, the Open Source Underwater Glider will receive $50,000 USD completes the awarding of more than $250,000 in cash prizes during the last eight months of the Hackaday Prize. More than…

via Open Source Underwater Glider Wins 2017 Hackaday Prize

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Open Source Underwater Glider Wins 2017 Hackaday Prize

Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera

From Jeremy S. Cook on the Tindie blog:

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Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera

Thermal imaging has remained an interesting, if costly, technology for some time. One lower cost option is the the Grid-EYE sensor from Panasonic. While it has a resolution of only 8×8 pixels, it’s priced in the low double digit range, making it an ideal candidate for budget projects. If you’d like to add it to your build, Pesky Products has a has a breakout available that allows it to be used with the I²C protocol.

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Xose Pérez, after finding this sensor and breakout on Tindie, which he (correctly) considers “a great place to find uncommon electronic components or weird/interesting boards,” decided to make his own low-resolution IR camera. At only 64 pixels of resolution, it’s not as capable as more expensive units, but it could still be very useful for getting a general idea of what is hot and cold in a room/environment. The case is made out of slices of acrylic, paper, cardboard, and MDF, giving it a very unique look. It also features a small screen to display supplemental information, and a simple button/switch  interface.

Grid-EYE 8×8 Infrared Camera