Hackaday Supercon returns for 2022

After two years in remote mode, we’re very excited to announce that this year’s Hackaday Supercon will be coming back, live! Join us Nov. 4th, 5th, and 6th in sunny Pasadena, CA for three days of hacks, talks, and socializing with the Hackaday community. And we’d love to see and hear in person what you’ve been up to for the last two years – so start brainstorming what you’re going to talk about now and fill out the call for proposals.

Read more …

Hackaday Supercon returns for 2022

Pocket Integrator

Mykle Hansen designed this open hardware add-on board that lets you play your Pocket Operator drum machine like a maraca:

Pocket Integrator is a magical, musical add-on board for Teenage Engineering’s Pocket Operator drum machines. Using a MEMS accelerometer, it lets you play drum patterns and synthesizers by tapping and shaking, just like a handheld percussion instrument. Play your Pocket Operator like a drum!

Tap to set the tempo and downbeat. Keep tapping as long as you like. When you stop, it’ll hold the beat wherever you set it. It’s as easy as clapping your hands! (In fact, it’s like using your hands to clap another pair of hands that magically keep clapping after you stop clapping your hands.)

Read more on Crowd Supply

Pocket Integrator

OSHWA announces Open Hardware Trailblazers

From the Open Source Hardware Association:

OSHWA recently announced a call for Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellows. Thanks to the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, OSHWA is taking a giant step towards expanding open source hardware in academia through the Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellows initiative. The one-year fellowship provides grants to individuals who are leading the way as open source hardware expands into academia. The fellows will document their experience of making open source hardware in academia to create a library of resources for others to follow.

The call was incredibly competitive. We received truly amazing submissions. The fellows were chosen by the program’s mentors and an OSHWA board selection committee.

Congratulations to the Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellows!

Read more about the fellows…

OSHWA announces Open Hardware Trailblazers

2022 Hackaday Prize Enters Second Round: Reuse, Recycle, Revamp

“Ding! That’s the bell for the second challenge round of the 2022 Hackaday Prize. If your project reuses or recycles what would otherwise be waste materials, or helps you to do the same for further projects, we want to see it.

Hackers are often frugal folk — we’ll recycle parts for projects because it’s easier on the pocketbook when prototyping. But in these strangest of times, when we’ve seen $1 microcontrollers in such shortage that they fetch $57 apiece (if you can get the parts at all), making use of what you’ve got on hand can be an outright necessity. If this is going to become the new normal, it’s going to make sense that we automate it. There’s gold, literally and metaphorically, in busted PCBs. How are you going to get the most value out of our broken electronic waste in our post-apocalyptic near future? Have you built an unpick-and-unplace machine? We’d like to see it.

But electronic parts are a small fraction of your recyclable materials, and plastics might play a larger role. If you’re a 3D printerer, you’ve doubtless thought about recycling plastic bottles into filament. Or maybe you’d like to take some of the existing plastics that are thrust upon you by this modern world and give them a second life? This factory churning out paving stones by remelting plastic with sand is doing it on an industrial scale, but could this be useful for the home gamer? Precious Plastic has a number of inspirational ideas. Or maybe you just need an HDPE hammer?

Have you built a fancy can crusher, or a plastics sorter, or a recycling robot? Head on over to Hackaday.io, write it up, and enter it into the Prize!”

Read more on Hackaday…

2022 Hackaday Prize Enters Second Round: Reuse, Recycle, Revamp

The 2022 Open Hardware Summit is LIVE!

Tune in to the 2022 Open Hardware Summit live stream:

Here is the schedule:

The summit is available on YouTube for free, but buying a ticket helps support OSH year-round! We have PWYC, Standard, and Goodie Bag tickets, as well as free RSVP tickets.

The Open Hardware Summit is the annual conference organized by the Open Source Hardware Association a 501(c)(3) not for profit charity. It is the world’s first comprehensive conference on open hardware; a venue and community in which we discuss and draw attention to the rapidly growing Open Source Hardware movement.

Speakers include world renowned leaders from industry, academia, the arts and maker community. Talks cover a wide range of subjects from electronics, mechanics to related fields such as digital fabrication, fashion technology, self-quantification devices, and IP law. As a microcosm of the Open Source Hardware community, the Summit provides an annual friendly forum for the community. For over five years we have had an established fellowship which supports travel and admission for women and other minorities as well as hardship tickets for low income individuals. The Open Hardware Summit was founded in 2010 by Alicia Gibb and Ayah Bdeir with support from Peter Semmelhack and Bug Labs in its founding years. Read more about the history of the organization and feel free to contact us with any questions.

The 2022 Open Hardware Summit is LIVE!

Programmable Voltage Reference, now in After Dark

Barbouri’s Electronics Projects blog describes an updated Programmable Voltage Reference:

After five years and a few prototype revisions of the Version 2.12 Programmable Voltage reference, I decided it was time to update the project based on many requests and lessons learned from prototypes over the years.

The project remained dormant for several years while I worked on many other projects. After many requests for a 5 volt version of the PVR, I started working on an updated design again last year (2021) at a slow pace. The two main design factors were, providing an output up to 5 volts, and reducing the drift at the output from temperature and humidity changes.

What I ended up with after many iterations, was a 0.001 to 5.000 volt output version 3.14 of the Programmable Voltage Reference, with new components and and upgraded specifications.

Read more…

Programmable Voltage Reference, now in After Dark

Enter the 2022 Hackaday Prize and Help Save the World

This year’s 2022 Hackaday Prize challenges you to think of big or small ways to create greener energy sources, make recycling easier, hack old devices to save them from the landfill, or build out the networks that keep our local communities together and conscious of our group effort. If you’ve got a super solar harvester, a recycling robot, or even reverse engineering tools to help combat forced technological obsolescence, we want to see your hacks. Or if you’d like, you can simply save the world in the wildcard round.

As always, courtesy of our overlords at Supplyframe and the generous sponsorship of Digikey, we’ve got tons of prize money to give out to the best projects. The top ten projects in each of five challenge rounds will receive a $500 cash prize, and five winning projects will bag from $5,000 to $50,000 in the finals in November. But you shouldn’t wait — the first round, Planet-Friendly Power, starts right now!

Read more…

Enter the 2022 Hackaday Prize and Help Save the World

First Oregon-made satellite now orbiting earth

We are thrilled by the recent successful deployment of OreSat0 into orbit and congratulate the Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) on their tremendous achievement!

After months of research, testing, and development, the first Oregon-made satellite, built by Portland State University students apart of the Portland Aerospace Society, was launched into space this month and is currently orbiting the earth sending back data packets.

The Portland State Aerospace society is a primarily undergraduate group at Portland State University that builds small rockets and satellites.

OreSat0, made of solar panels, batteries, radios, computer, GPS, and a star tracker, has been years in the making, according to David Lay, an Electrical Engineering undergrad involved in the Portland State Aerospace Society.

Read more on Fox12 Oregon….

First Oregon-made satellite now orbiting earth

Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellowship

The Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) has just announced our Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship. The one year fellowship provides $50,000 or $100,000 grants to individuals who are leading the way as open source hardware expands into academia. The fellows will document their experience of making open source hardware in academia to create a library of resources for others to follow. The RFP is here, and the application form for fellows is here. It is due April 7th.

To support the Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship, OSHWA is recruiting open source hardware professionals and practitioners from both inside and outside of academia with diverse backgrounds to serve on the mentor committee. The committee will review applications, make recommendations on fellowship awards, and advise fellows through their year-long Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship. For more details you can see this postThe mentor application is due March 30th.

Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellowship