Programmable Voltage Reference, now in After Dark

Barbouri’s Electronics Projects blog describes an updated Programmable Voltage Reference:

After five years and a few prototype revisions of the Version 2.12 Programmable Voltage reference, I decided it was time to update the project based on many requests and lessons learned from prototypes over the years.

The project remained dormant for several years while I worked on many other projects. After many requests for a 5 volt version of the PVR, I started working on an updated design again last year (2021) at a slow pace. The two main design factors were, providing an output up to 5 volts, and reducing the drift at the output from temperature and humidity changes.

What I ended up with after many iterations, was a 0.001 to 5.000 volt output version 3.14 of the Programmable Voltage Reference, with new components and and upgraded specifications.

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Programmable Voltage Reference, now in After Dark

Enter the 2022 Hackaday Prize and Help Save the World

This year’s 2022 Hackaday Prize challenges you to think of big or small ways to create greener energy sources, make recycling easier, hack old devices to save them from the landfill, or build out the networks that keep our local communities together and conscious of our group effort. If you’ve got a super solar harvester, a recycling robot, or even reverse engineering tools to help combat forced technological obsolescence, we want to see your hacks. Or if you’d like, you can simply save the world in the wildcard round.

As always, courtesy of our overlords at Supplyframe and the generous sponsorship of Digikey, we’ve got tons of prize money to give out to the best projects. The top ten projects in each of five challenge rounds will receive a $500 cash prize, and five winning projects will bag from $5,000 to $50,000 in the finals in November. But you shouldn’t wait — the first round, Planet-Friendly Power, starts right now!

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Enter the 2022 Hackaday Prize and Help Save the World

First Oregon-made satellite now orbiting earth

We are thrilled by the recent successful deployment of OreSat0 into orbit and congratulate the Portland State Aerospace Society (PSAS) on their tremendous achievement!

After months of research, testing, and development, the first Oregon-made satellite, built by Portland State University students apart of the Portland Aerospace Society, was launched into space this month and is currently orbiting the earth sending back data packets.

The Portland State Aerospace society is a primarily undergraduate group at Portland State University that builds small rockets and satellites.

OreSat0, made of solar panels, batteries, radios, computer, GPS, and a star tracker, has been years in the making, according to David Lay, an Electrical Engineering undergrad involved in the Portland State Aerospace Society.

Read more on Fox12 Oregon….

First Oregon-made satellite now orbiting earth

Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellowship

The Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) has just announced our Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship. The one year fellowship provides $50,000 or $100,000 grants to individuals who are leading the way as open source hardware expands into academia. The fellows will document their experience of making open source hardware in academia to create a library of resources for others to follow. The RFP is here, and the application form for fellows is here. It is due April 7th.

To support the Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship, OSHWA is recruiting open source hardware professionals and practitioners from both inside and outside of academia with diverse backgrounds to serve on the mentor committee. The committee will review applications, make recommendations on fellowship awards, and advise fellows through their year-long Open Hardware Trailblazers Fellowship. For more details you can see this postThe mentor application is due March 30th.

Open Hardware Trailblazer Fellowship

An “unbusy” USB-C port doubles-up for JTAG Programming

Joshua Vasquez writes:

Board space is a premium on small circuit board designs, and [Alvaro] knows it. So instead of adding a separate programming port, he’s found a niche USB-C feature that lets him use the port that he’s already added both for its primary application and for programming the target microcontroller over JTAG. The result is that he no longer needs to worry about spending precious board space for a tiny programming port; the USB-C port timeshares for both!

In a Twitter thread (Unrolled Link), [Alvaro] walks us through his discovery and progress towards an encapsulated solution. It turns out that the USB-C spec supports a “Debug-Accessory Mode” specification, where some pins are allowed to be repurposed if pins CC1 and CC2 are pulled up to Logic-1. Under these circumstances, the pin functions are released, and a JTAG programmer can step in to borrow them. To expose the port to a programmer, [Alvaro] cooked up a small breakout board with a USB-C plug and separate microcontroller populated on it.

This board also handles a small quirk. Since [Alvaro’s] choice of programming pins aren’t reversible, the USB-C plug will only work one of the two ways it can be plugged in. To keep the user informed, this breakout board sports a red LED for incorrect orientation and a green LED for correct orientation–nifty. While this design quirk sacrifices reversibility, it preserves the USB 2.0 D+ and D- pins while also handling some edge cases with regard to the negotiating for access to the port.

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An “unbusy” USB-C port doubles-up for JTAG Programming

Hackable IR remote for home automation

Aeroh One is a hackable IR remote board that can turn any remote-controlled device into an internet-connected one. It will support Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple Siri, iOS/Android App, and IFTTT integration. Aeroh One is compatible with the majority of remote controls that operate over infrared.

Aeroh One has a small footprint, making it easy to mount on top of the infra-red remote receiver of your equipment. In addition, we will have a wide range of mounting options that you can either order or 3D models you can freely download and print yourself.

You can continue to use your old OEM remote while Aeroh One is mounted on the equipment. This is because Aeroh One has an infra-red remote receiver in the front, and can proxy the signals that it receives. It is programmed to emit the remote signals based on what your equipment can understand. With this infra-red remote receiver you can also record custom infra-red signals and program the Aeroh One to work with new equipment.

With Aeroh One, make your smart home smarter, without breaking the bank!

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Hackable IR remote for home automation

Remake of the Hewlett Packard 11456A Read Out Test Card

The HP 11456A Read Out Test Card is a nifty little test board that plugs into the HP 3470 series display modules. I really wish that I had had one of these, before I started working on my faulty HP 34740A display module.

The HP 11456A Read Out Test Card is a nifty little test board that plugs into the HP 3470 series display modules. I really wish that I had had one of these, before I started working on my faulty HP 34740A display module.

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Remake of the Hewlett Packard 11456A Read Out Test Card

Backpack Board for OLEDs Boasts Fancy Features

From Donald Papp on Hackaday:

Back when LCD character displays based on the HD44780 controller were the bee’s knees, a way to make them easier to work with came in the form of “backpack” PCBs, which provided an accessible serial interface and superior display handling at the same time. [Barbouri] has updated that idea with a backpack board that mounts to OLED displays using the US2066 display driver, and provides an I2C interface with powerful and convenient high-level functions that make the display simple to use.

On the software side, the backpack uses this I2cCharDisplay driver project which provides functions like cursor control, fading, display shifting, and of course writing characters or strings. While [Barbouri] designed the board specifically to accommodate Newhaven Slim Character OLED displays, it should in theory work with any US2066-based OLED character display. [Barbouri]’s design files for the Slim-OLED Display backpack board are available for download directly from the project page (link is near the bottom), or boards can be purchased directly from OSH Park.

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Backpack Board for OLEDs Boasts Fancy Features

DIY “Solid State Drive” Puts Four Bytes in Your Pocket

Tom Nardi writes:

this USB-C tetrabyte drive created by [Glen Akins] might be slightly too small for our tastes. No, that’s not a typo. As in the Greek tetra, this drive can hold a massive four bytes at a time. Even better, you don’t need a computer to write to it: the 32 DIP switches let you key in the content on the fly, bit-by-bit.

As explained in a Twitter thread, [Glen] was inspired to create this gadget after another user posted a picture of a 32 position DIP switch with a caption that said it was a “One Tetrabyte SSD” back in December. He apparently couldn’t track down the same switch, but the four red Grayhill 76 Series switches arguably make it a bit clearer when entering in your bytes.

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DIY “Solid State Drive” Puts Four Bytes in Your Pocket

OSHWA is hiring a Program Coordinator

The Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) is looking for a Program Coordinator to assist with a new program designed to engage open hardware in academia. The new program will give grants to academics to document the process of creating successful open hardware projects in academia. The Program Coordinator will be responsible for assisting in building out the program, managing the day-to-day deadlines of grantees, answering questions, scheduling meetings, and generally facilitating the development of the network. Ideal candidates will have an understanding of academic operations, typical academic outputs, budgets, and open source hardware.  However, candidates do not need to be situated in academia.

OSHWA is a steward to the community of people who create, study, and use open source hardware. Open source hardware is hardware whose intellectual property is open rather than closed, i.e. patented. OSHWA is a US based 501(c)3 non-profit. OSHWA aims to foster technological knowledge and encourage research that is accessible, collaborative and respects user freedom. 

OSHWA believes that the open source hardware community is strengthened by its diversity and, as such, encourages people of color, women, the LGBTQIA+ community, persons with disabilities, and people at intersections of these identities, from across the spectrum of disciplines and methods, to apply for this position.

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OSHWA is hiring a Program Coordinator