Donkey Self-Driving Car

Kwabena Agyeman shows how to create a DIY Robocar forked off of the “Donkey” Self-Driving car platform using the OpenMV Cam

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Donkey Self-Driving Car

The OpenMV Cam Donkey Car is designed to be easy to build out of parts that you can buy online and assemble together with basic tools. Below is the list of essential parts you’ll need to build the self-driving car.

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Here is the car in action:

kwagyeman has shared the servo controller board on OSH Park:

OpenMV Cam Servo Controller

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Order from OSH Park

Donkey Self-Driving Car

Hologram.io: Open-Sourcing Our Hardware

Ben Strahan of Hologram.io writes about why development hardware should be open source:

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Open-Sourcing Our Hardware

It’s a simple premise – black boxes stifle innovation while open systems encourage exploration. Black Boxes and IP have their place as an essential tool in our economy; but in an industry like IoT where rapid innovation is needed, we need to push for open development tools as the building blocks that lead to innovative end-products for industry and consumers.

Going forward Hologram will open-source all hardware we develop for the developer community, including dependent firmware, through OSHWA. We see this as a mandatory step we need to take to help move IoT forward, to lower the barriers to entry, and to spur innovation in a rapidly evolving ecosystem.

The hardware design files for the new Hologram Nova module are available on GitHub:

Hologram Nova Hardware Repository

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Hologram.io: Open-Sourcing Our Hardware

Live Streams and Hack Chat From The Hackaday Superconference

Want to experience the Hackaday Superconference from the comfort of your own workshop? Just follow us on YouTube or on Facebook as two days of live streaming talks begin this Saturday morning. This weekend is the Hackaday Superconference, the greatest hardware conference on Earth. While the Superconference is the most amazing gatherings of engineers and engineering…

via Live Streams and Hack Chat From The Hackaday Superconference

Live Streams and Hack Chat From The Hackaday Superconference

Reflowduino: Open Source Reflow Oven Controller

 writes on Hackaday about Timothy Woo’s Reflowduino:

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Reflowduino, the Open Source Reflow Oven Controller

Face it — you want a reflow oven. Even the steadiest hands and best eyes only yield “meh” results with a manual iron on SMD boards, and forget about being able to scale up to production. But what controller should you use when you build your oven, and what features should it support? Don’t worry…

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Dubbed the Reflowduino for obvious reasons, Timothy Woo’s Hackaday Prize entry has everything you need in a reflow oven controller, and a few things you never knew you needed.
 
 
Reflowduino: Open Source Reflow Oven Controller

Making Braille Signs out of PCBs

From  on Hackaday:

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Making Braille Signs out of PCBs

[jg] recently passed some damaged Braille signs and took on the challenge of repairing them. Informed by his recent work on PCB lapel pins, [jg] immediately thought of using circuit boards for this project. He’d noticed that round solder pads made for uniform hills of solder, and this reminded him of the bumps in Braille.

 

He began by reading up on the standards of the Braille Authority of North America, which stipulates a dot height of 0.6mm. He loaded up the PharmaBraille font system and laid it out the dots in photoshop, then and imported it into KiCad and laid out the boards. When the PCBs had arrived from OSH Park, [jg] soldering up the pads (lead free, but of course) to see if he could get the hills to 0.6mm. He’s experimenting with different methods of melting the solder to try to get more even results

 

Making Braille Signs out of PCBs

Ben Krasnow Hacks E-Paper For Fastest Refresh Rate

[Ben Krasnow] is known for his clear explanations alongside awesome hardware, being one of only a few hackers who owns an electron microscope. This time he’s explaining how E-paper works while modifying the firmware of a 4.2 inch E-paper module to get a higher refresh rate. As for the awesome hardware, he also analyses the…

via [Ben Krasnow] Hacks E-Paper For Fastest Refresh Rate — Hackaday

Ben Krasnow Hacks E-Paper For Fastest Refresh Rate