Hackaday: “A Few of Our Favorite Chips”

Raindrops on roses, and whiskers on kittens? They’re alright, I suppose. But when it comes down to it, I’d probably rather have a bunch of 4051, 4052, and 4053 analog multiplexers on the component shelf. Why? Because the ability to switch analog signals around, routing them at will, under control of a microcontroller is tremendously…

via A Few of Our Favorite Chips: 4051 Analog Mux — Hackaday

Hackaday: “A Few of Our Favorite Chips”

Hackaday: Cheap Helping Hands

We think of helping hands as those little alligator clips on a metal stand. They are cheap and fall over, so we tend to buy them and don’t use them. However, if you are willing to put $35 or $40 into it, you can get the newer kind that have–well–tentacles–on a heavy base. [Archie_slap] didn’t…

via Cheap Helping Hands: Just Add Time — Hackaday

Hackaday: Cheap Helping Hands

3D Printing A Synthesizer


From Brian Benchoff on Hackaday:

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Before there were samplers, romplers, Skrillex, FM synths, and all the other sounds that don’t fit into the trailer for the new Blade Runner movie, electronic music was simple. Voltage controlled oscillators, voltage controlled filters, and CV keyboards ruled the roost. We’ve gone over a lot of voltage controlled synths, but [Tommy] took it to the next level. He designed a small, minimum viable synth based around the VCO in an old 4046 PLL chip

The circuit for this synth is built in two halves. The biggest, and what probably took the most time designing, is the key bed. This is a one-octave keyboard that’s completely 3D printed. We’ve seen something like this before in one of the projects from the SupplyFrame Design Lab residents, though while that keyboard worked it was necessary for [Tim], the creator of that project, to find a company that could make custom key beds for him.

Read more on the F0 on Tommy’s blog:

Hello, F0

Say hello to the F0: a minimalist, analog, square wave synthesizer.

3D Printing A Synthesizer

SupplyFrame Hardware Developers meetup before Maker Faire

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We’re excited that there will be a SupplyFrame Hardware Developers meetup next Thursday before Maker Faire Bay Area weekend:

Sensing Expansion

Thursday, May 18, 2017, 6:30 PM

Supplyframe SF Office
500 3rd St STE230 San Francisco, CA

10 Hardware Developers Attending

We’re having another meetup, this one right before the Bay Area Maker Faire weekend. That means we’ll have a mix of familiar and new faces at the event. We have some familiar and impressive speakers, as always.This month we’re pleased to welcome Jonathan Foote. He is a recovering scientist, tinkerer, and creative technologist with decades of hands…

Check out this Meetup →

SupplyFrame Hardware Developers meetup before Maker Faire

Hackaday+Tindie Maker Faire Meetup

We had a great time last year and recommend folks at Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 come  to this Saturday night meetup hosted by Hackaday and Tindie:

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It’s Maker Faire Bay Area time of year again and we’re holding our 4th annual Hackaday and Tindie MFBA Meetup!

After a ridiculously fun Saturday at Maker Faire, carry on the festivities with us at O’Neill’s in San Mateo on Saturday night from 7pm.

Bring your finest blinky, flashy, IoT, hacks, wearables, or other techy items for us to paw. Bonus points if you bring your #HackadayPrize project for us to get super excited about.

We can’t wait to see you there or at the faire.

Space is limited, so get your foot in the door early. 21 or over only. Please bring ID.

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Hackaday+Tindie Maker Faire Meetup

Hackaday Prize Entry: Secure Storage on SD Cards

Here’s a puzzler for you: how do you securely send data from one airgapped computer to another? Sending it over a network is right out, because that’s the entire point of an airgap. A sneakernet is inherently insecure, and you shouldn’t overestimate the security of a station wagon filled with tapes. For his Hackaday Prize…

via Hackaday Prize Entry: Secure Storage on SD Cards — Hackaday

Hackaday Prize Entry: Secure Storage on SD Cards