Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API

News from the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA):

Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API

Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware.

OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware.  Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica.  Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

You know that it complies with the definition and that the documentation can be found using its unique identifier (UID).

What’s New?

The new API supports both read and write access to the certification process.  

Write access means that you can submit certification applications directly instead of using the application form.  If you already have all of the application information in a system, there is no need to retype them into a webform.

We hope that this will make it easier for entities that certify large amounts of hardware to build the certification process directly into their standard workflow.  We are also working with popular platforms to integrate a ‘certify’ button directly into their systems.  

Read access gives you access to information about hardware that has already been certified.  This will make it easier to explore the data for research, create compelling visualizations of certified hardware, and build customized lenses to understand what is happening in open source hardware.  

What Happens Now?

The first thing you can do is get a key and start exploring the API itself.  The team at Objectively has created detailed documentation, code snippets, and sandboxes that make it easy to test out all of the features.  

In the longer term, we hope that the community will build better ways to both submit applications for certification and present information about certified hardware.  OSHWA expects to maintain our application form and certification list for the foreseeable future.  That being said, we are also happy to share (and possibly cede) the stage to better ways to get information into and out of the system as they come along.  

For now, let us know what you do with the API!  You can tweet to us @OHSummit or send us an email at [email protected]

Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API

OSHW Community Survey 2020

News from the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA):

OSHW Community Survey 2020

In 2020 we conducted the third OSHW Community Survey (see 2012 and 2013), which collected 441 responses. All questions were optional, so you may notice response counts do not always add up to 441. In particular, a number of individuals didn’t feel comfortable with the demographic questions. We ask these questions as part of our efforts to promote diversity in the community, but these too were optional and anonymous.

A few highlights from this year’s survey compared to the 2013 survey:

  • The portion of people coming to open source hardware from open source software increased from 14.6% to 23.9%
  • In 2013, 42.8% of respondents indicated they have worked on or contributed to an open hardware project. This jumped to 85.6% in 2020.
  • While 2013 showed a plurality of people using blogs to publish design files, this year’s survey shows public repositories as the most popular option. The increase in people with open source software experience and improvement in repository collaboration offerings may be contributing factors.
  • This year’s survey shows a large increase in attendees for the 2020 Open Hardware Summit. This is likely due to 2020 being the first virtual summit. Although it was moved online due to unfortunate circumstances, the virtual platform offered the upside of greatly expanding the audience.
  • A small gain in the community’s gender diversity was seen, with those identifying as either female or other making up 18% of respondents, compared to 7% in 2013.

Interested in more granular results for any of these questions? Reach out to us at [email protected]

OSHW Community Survey 2020

Open Hardware Month: awesome makers to follow

For Open Hardware Month, Jeffrey Yoo Warren from the Open Source Hardware Association is compiling a list of Black creators in maker/DIY/open hardware/art:

Open Hardware Month: awesome makers to follow

OSHWA 2020-2022 Board Nominations Open!

Now is the time to nominate yourself for the Open Source Hardware Associtaion (OSHWA) board of directors:

OSHWA 2020-2022 Board Nominations Open!

OSHWA is looking for 5 new faces to join the board of directors for the Open Source Hardware Association.

The nominee form is, as always, for self-nominations only. Please fill out the nominee form (deactivated 11:59PM ET on Oct. 10th) to become a nominee or forward the link to someone you want to nominate. Do not fill out the form for someone else. The purpose of this form is to tell voting members why you want to serve on the OSHWA board. We will be publish the nominees and their answers on Oct 12th. Board members hold a 2-year position. Once board members have been chosen by the community, the board will appoint a President, VP, and Secretary. Board responsibilities include fundraising, advising on goals and direction, and carry out compliance with the organizations purposes and bylaws. See the board member agreement to get a sense of the responsibilities. Board members are expected to adhere to the board attendance policy and come prepared having read the board packet. Board members are expected to spend 5-10 hours of time per month on OSHWA. Nominees can submit questions to [email protected] Nominations will be open until Oct. 10th.

OSHWA 2020-2022 Board Nominations Open!

Open Source Hardware Certifications For August 2020

Salman Faris writes on Make about the latest Open Source Hardware certifications:

Open Source Hardware Certifications For August 2020

Hello Makers, In the month of August we had 14 newly certified open-source hardware. Today I will introduce each of them to you. I hope it may help you in the next project or product.

HSSV ATSAMR21 Breakout is a development board to accelerate the deployment of IEEE 802.15.4 based networks on the 2.4Ghz band. It is based on the ATSAMR21G18-MR210UA module which also includes support for antenna-diversity and a crypto-acceleration chip. This board was designed to be breadboard-friendly and includes USB support and power & LiPo battery management.

The Boards are pre-loaded with the bossa bootloader (used by Arduino) with the command line tool bosses and they have a small development batch. If you are interested in collaborating on the development please contact them. This is the first certified open-source hardware from El Salvador.

Certification Page

Project Page

Open Source Hardware Certifications For August 2020

October is Open Hardware Month

October is right around the corner, which means it’s time to get ready for Open Hardware Month! This year with the theme is Label and Certify to the spotlight on two ways to help the world know your hardware is Open Source:

Label and Certify This Open Hardware Month

Open Hardware Facts

Inspired by our Executive Director Alicia Gibb, and created by board member Jeffrey Yoo Warren, the Open Hardware Facts Generator helps you declare the licenses used in your project using a format similar to the US Nutrition Facts Label. Listing your licenses in one prominent place (such as the README of your repository) helps users immediately know what they can and can’t do with your source, rather than having to browse through individual files.

OSHWA Certification

The OSHWA Certification continues to grow, with almost 1,000 projects from over 40 countries! If you’re not yet familiar, the certification program provides a way for consumers to immediately recognize hardware whose meaning of “Open” conforms to the OSHW Definition. It also provides a directory for OSHW creators, which stands as evidence that your product is in compliance with the OSHW Definition.

Hosting and Joining OHM Events

We invite individuals and companies alike to host events relating to the theme, or supporting Open Hardware more generally. Unlike previous years, we expect most events to be virtual due to COVID-19. Thankfully, both labeling and certifying can be done from home! If you choose to host an in-person event, we expect you to follow all local health guidelines to help keep our community safe. Find what you need to plan an OHM event at the OHM website.

Looking for an OHM event to join? As events are submitted and approved, they’ll be listed on the OHM website as well. For virtual events, we’ll also list the online platform being used and the event’s time zone.

October is Open Hardware Month

First certified open source hardware from El Salvador

OSHWA has announced the first certified open source hardware from El Salvador:

Hackerspace San Salvador ATSAMR21 Breakout

The breakout board uses the module ATSAMR21G18A-MR210UA. This module combines the ATSAMR21G18, a 4Mb Flash memory AT45DB041E and a crypto-authentication chip ATECC508A.

This breakout board also includes a power-path/LiPo charge management unit MCP73871 and a very low dropout 3.3V regulator LD3985M33R.

  • 32 bits ARM Cortex M0+ microcontroller
  • 2.4GHz low-power transceiver for IEEE 802.15.4 + ZigBee
  • 256KB Flash
  • Maximum operating frecuency of 48MHz
  • Integrated temperature sensor
  • 4Mb external Flash memory
  • Cryto chip with: Secure key storage, high-speed public-key algorithms, elliptic curves support (NIST P256), SHA-256, unique serial number, high-quality RNG.
  • Pre-set MAC address

Design files for this board are available on GitHub.

First certified open source hardware from El Salvador

Label and Certify This Open Hardware Month

An update from the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA):

Label and Certify This Open Hardware Month

October is right around the corner, which means it’s time to get ready for Open Hardware Month! This year with our theme of Label and Certify we’re putting the spotlight on two ways to help the world know your hardware is Open Source: Open Hardware Facts and the OSHWA Certification.

Open Hardware Facts

Inspired by our Executive Director Alicia Gibb, and created by board member Jeffrey Yoo Warren, the Open Hardware Facts Generator helps you declare the licenses used in your project using a format similar to the US Nutrition Facts Label. Listing your licenses in one prominent place (such as the README of your repository) helps users immediately know what they can and can’t do with your source, rather than having to browse through individual files.

OSHWA Certification

The OSHWA Certification continues to grow, with almost 1,000 projects from over 40 countries! If you’re not yet familiar, the certification program provides a way for consumers to immediately recognize hardware whose meaning of “Open” conforms to the OSHW Definition. It also provides a directory for OSHW creators, which stands as evidence that your product is in compliance with the OSHW Definition.

Hosting and Joining OHM Events

We invite individuals and companies alike to host events relating to the theme, or supporting Open Hardware more generally. Unlike previous years, we expect most events to be virtual due to COVID-19. Thankfully, both labeling and certifying can be done from home! If you choose to host an in-person event, we expect you to follow all local health guidelines to help keep our community safe. Find what you need to plan an OHM event at the OHM website.

Looking for an OHM event to join? As events are submitted and approved, they’ll be listed on the OHM website as well. For virtual events, we’ll also list the online platform being used and the event’s time zone.

Label and Certify This Open Hardware Month

Applied Ion Systems: open source space propulsion

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Michael Bretti of Applied Ion Systems describes open source space propulsion at the 2020 Open Hardware Summit:

Applied Ion Systems is creating open source electric propulsion systems

Applied Ion Systems initially started out of a personal hobbyist effort to share projects involving plasma systems, particle beams, and and high vacuum projects.   Later, as I began to expand my efforts and meet awesome makers around the world, I began focusing my efforts on open source electric propulsion for small satellites, such as PocketQubes and CubeSats.

Eventually, this effort evolved into the world’s first and only open-source home-based electric propulsion program, working on cutting edge plasma and ion thrusters for small satellites on a hobbyist level budget.

My main objective was to provide intensive engineering resources, data, and system designs for the community to help lower the barriers of entry into the field, and allow enthusiasts to follow along the journey of creating and testing these advanced systems, with the ultimate goal of developing low-cost, easy-to-use, fully integrated space-qualified thrusters.

Applied Ion Systems: open source space propulsion

OSHWA: A Resolution to Redefine SPI Signal Names

The Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) has just posted:

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A Resolution to Redefine SPI Signal Names

We, the undersigned, encourage educators, engineers, designers, and community members to discontinue the use of the terms MOSI/MISO/SS and in their place use SDO/SDI/CS.

  • New signal names:
    • SDO – Serial Data Out. An output signal on a device where data is sent out to another SPI device.
    • SDI – Serial Data In. An input signal on a device where data is received from another SPI device.
    • CS – Chip Select. Activated by the controller to initiate communication with a given peripheral.
    • COPI (controller out / peripheral in). For devices that can be either a controller or a peripheral; the signal on which the device sends output when acting as the controller, and receives input when acting as the peripheral.
    • CIPO (controller in / peripheral out). For devices that can be either a controller or a peripheral; the signal on which the device receives input when acting as the controller, and sends output when acting as the peripheral.
      SDIO – Serial Data In/Out. A bi-directional serial signal.
  • Deprecated signal names:
    • MOSI – Master Out Slave In
    • MISO – Master In Slave Out
    • SS – Slave Select
    • MOMI – Master Out Master In
    • SOSI – Slave Out Slave In
  • Signal names unchanged:
    • SCK – Serial Clock. The clock for the bus generated by the controller.

Designers should avoid signal names MOSI/MISO and instead use SDO/SDI. The SDI signal is defined by the perspective of the device. For example, the SDI signal on a sensor is the pin that receives data from the controller. Similarly, the SDO pin on a controller is the output pin that sends data to a peripheral.

It is best practice to use SDO/SDI and Controller/Peripheral. Change the way you write tutorials, create schematics, and diagrams. This is the best way to educate the next generation of users and engineers.

Read more..

OSHWA: A Resolution to Redefine SPI Signal Names