Drinkro the Synchro Bartender

Synchro Labs created this project to demonstrate the use of the Synchro mobile app platform with custom hardware:

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Drinkro Cocktail Robot

based on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and a custom-designed hardware board used to control four DC liquid peristaltic pump motors using two L293D dual H-bridge ICs

Hardware design files are available on GitHub:

images11SynchroLabs/DrinkroHardware

 

Video of Drinkro in action:

Drinkro the Synchro Bartender

Building Beautiful Boards With Star Simpson

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Star Simpson, creator of Circuit Classics, gave this excellent talk at Hackaday Supercon:

Building Beautiful Boards With Star Simpson

Over the last decade or so, the cost to produce a handful of custom PCBs has dropped through the floor. Now, you don’t have to use software tied to one fab house – all you have to do is drop an Eagle or KiCad file onto an order form and hit ‘submit’.

Building Beautiful Boards With Star Simpson

Internet connected gaming chair

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Internet connected gaming chair (DX racer)

A very fun Internet of things project to control the custom RGB led over the internet from a web-browser or enjoy a nice sound reactive experience. Perfect for a smart home setup as you can easily connect this to any IoT platform or smart home software

Shortcuts:

  • 0:45 – zPulse intro
  • 1:00 – Designing the board in EagleCad
  • 7:45 – Sending the board to a manufactured to get fabricated
  • 8:40 – Applying soldering paste to the Board
  • 11:25 – Baking the board and components
  • 15:27 – Powering on the board for the first time!
Internet connected gaming chair

Alan Yates on Making Valve’s VR Work

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Alan Yates of Valve talked at Hackaday Supercon about the research and development of the hardware in the HTC Vive virtual reality system:

Hackaday: Why Valve’s Lighthouse Can’t Work

[Alan Yates] is a hacker’s engineer. His job at Valve has been to help them figure out the hardware that makes virtual reality (VR) a real reality. And he invented a device that’s clever enough that it really should work, but difficult enough that it wasn’t straightforward how to make it work

Alan Yates on Making Valve’s VR Work

Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop

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Elkim Roa of OnchipUIS presented recently at the 5th RISC-V Workshop on the latest news of the Open-V open silicon microcontroller and their YoPuzzle educational platform:

YoPuzzle: A mRISC V development platform for next generations

Slides from the his talk:

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Live Demos Over the Internet

You can now program real Open-V dev boards from anywhere in the world and see the results on a live video feed! Here’s our first demo – blinking the dev board LEDs.

screenshot-from-2016-12-23-13-00-31Go to http://onchip.uis.edu/ to remotely program the demo board:

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Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop

Arduino-programmable ARM Cortex M4F Boards

Kris Winer of Pesky Products designed these easy-to-program, high-performance and low-power dev boards:

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Arduino-programmable Cortex M4F Development Boards

Program an STM32L4 Cortex M4F with the Arduino IDE via USB

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Technical specifications of the Butterfly and Ladybug STM32L4 dev boards:

  • Microcontroller: STM32L4 ARM Cortex M4F
  • Clock speed: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 48, 64, 80 MHz
  • Operating voltage: 3.3V
  •  I/O pin limits: most pins 5.0 V tolerant, 20 mA
  • Digital I/O pins: 22, with 11 PWM (Butterfly), 13, with 10 PWM (Ladybug)
  • Analog input pins: 6 (Butterfly), 5 (Ladybug), 12-bit ADC channels
  • Analog output pins: 2 12-bit DAC
  • RTC: 1 ppm accuracy
  • Flash memory: 256 KB
  • SRAM: 64 KB
  • Voltage regulator: 3.3-5.5V input / 3.3V, 150 mA output

New Butterfly and Ladybug add-on boards

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To the left is an MPU9250 accel/gyro/magnetometer motion sensor and the BME280 pressure/humidity/temperature sensor

To the right is an ESP8266 wifi-enabled add-on board for Butterfly

Ladybug environmental data logger

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Reading the BME280 and VEML6040 sensors at 0.5 Hz and outputting pressure, temperature, humidity, altitude, RGB light intensity and RTC time and date to the Sharp memory display

Simple designs make hardware customization easy

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Flight Controller:

STM32L432 receives quaternions from the EM7180, which itself is master to the motion and pressure sensors, GNSS data from the CAM M8Q, then processes and packages the data and sends it to the ESP8285 via UART bridge for transmission to a hand-held controller

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Industrial Diagnostics:

uses an STM32L433 as master to several slave sensors to detect and process signals from industrial equipment and report to a remote server via blue tooth

Arduino-programmable ARM Cortex M4F Boards

1bitsy and Black Magic Probe on embedded.fm

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Piotr Esden-Tempski and Gareth McMullin joined the embedded.fm podcast to talk about their Black Magic Probe and 1bitsy projects:

Episode 180: Chickens in Helmets

They discussed their current Kickstarter campaign:slideshow_1

Design files and source code for both projects is available on GitHub:

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In application debugger for ARM Cortex microcontrollers.

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Open Source JTAG enabled ARM development platform

You can also ask questions on Black Magic’s Gitter channel.

1bitsy and Black Magic Probe on embedded.fm