AlienWhoop V2 Flight Controller

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AlienWhoop flight controller for Tiny Whoop, Blade Inductrix, Eachine, BetaFPV, and other micro brushed quadcopter frames. Fully complete and hand assembled in the USA. Best in class flight controller running BetaFlight 3.2 release candidate (upgradable)–no surface mount soldering required.

AlienWhoop V2 Flight Controller

Asset Tracker

Kris Winer designed this is a small 4-layer PCB for remote logging of absolute position and orientation:

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Asset Tracker

STM32L433-based board with CAM M8Q concurrent GNSS, EM7180 + MPU9250 + MS5637 for absolute orientation, and an ESP8285 for wifi connectivity.

The absolute orientation engine uses the MPU9250 accel/gyro/magnetometer IMU sensor plus the MS5637 barometer as slaves to an EM7180 motion co-processor that sends quaternions and drift-stabilized altitude to the host via I2C.

PeskyProducts has shared the board on OSH Park:

AssetTracker.v02c

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Asset Tracker

STM32L4 Sensor Tile

From Kris Winer on Hackaday.io:

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STM32L4 Sensor Tile

Small, connected device for smelling and hearing in any environment.

This is a 20 mm x 20 mm four-layer pcb tile full of interesting sensors (ICS43434 I2S Digital Microphone, MPU6500 acclerometer/gyro, BME280 pressure/temperature/humidity, and CCS811 air quality) with a Rigado BMD-350 UART BLE bridge for sending data to a smart phone all managed by a STM32L432 host MCU.

The STM32L432 is programmed using the Arduino IDE via the USB connector and serial data can be displayed on the serial monitor to verify performance and proper function, etc. But it is intended to be powered by a small 150 mAH LiPo battery for wireless sensing applications. The STM32L4 is a very low power MCU and with proper sensor and radio management it is possible to get the average power usage down to the ~100uA level, meaning a 150 mAH LiPo battery can run the device for two months on a charge.

A library for it is available on GitHub:

kriswiner/SensorTile

A collection of sketches to run the STM32L432-based (20 mm x 20 mm) sensor tile with an MPU6500 accel/gyro, ICS43434 I2S digital microphone, BME280 temperature/pressure/humidity sensor, and CCS811 air quality sensor. The sensor tile has an on-board MAX1555 LiPo battery charger, an on/off switch, and a Rigado BMD-350 nRF52 BLE module.

 

 

 

STM32L4 Sensor Tile

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console

We’re excited about this new project from Piotr Esden-Tempski of 1BitSquared on Hackaday.io:
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1Bitsy 1UP

1Bitsy 1UP is a retro inspired handheld game console, the design is based on the 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 ARM Cortex-M4F 168MHz 192kb RAM and 1MB Flash micro controller. 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch, SDCard Reader and a few other components.

The display used is a TFT LCD with I2C CapTouch and ILI9341 driver. (should be compatible with the display sold by Adafruit on their breakouts as well as the buydisplay.com 2.8″ tft with CapTouch sensor)

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The most basic design consists of:

  • 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 (168MHz, 192kb RAM, 1MB Flash)
  • 240×320 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch and PWM backlight control
  • D-Pad, ABXY, Start, Select buttons
  • DAC audio out to headphones. (speakers optional)
  • SDCard connected over SDIO interface

The hardware design files and firmware source code are available on GitHub:

github1bitsy/1bitsy-1up

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console

EEEmu SPI

Blecky’s latest project on Hackaday.io is an EEPROM/Flash emulator with a fun name:

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EEEmu SPI

The EEEmu SPI emulates any Serial Peripheral Interface Bus EEPROM or Flash memory chipsets up to an interface speed of 25MHz. It also supports any supply and interface voltage between 1.8 to 5 Volts and can be configured to support even the largest of memory sizes.

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This repository contains configurations for all the currently supported EEPROM and Flash chips for the EEEmu SPI:

githubEEEmu/Supported-Devices

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EEEmu SPI

Teensy: TDM Support For Many-Channel Audio I/O

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Paul Stoffregen posted an update in his Teensy Audio Library on Hackaday.io:

TDM Support, For Many-Channel Audio I/O

Some projects need a lot of audio I/O. Maybe you’re doing positional audio sound effects (using the 8-tap delay effect) where ordinary stereo or even 5 channel “surround” isn’t enough? Maybe you’re making the ultimate Eurorack synthesizer module? Or you just want a lot of signals, because you can!

Here’s a board for the Cirrus Logic CS42448 chip, which provides 6 inputs and 8 outputs. All are high quality audio, and all work simultaneously.

PaulStoffregen has shared the board on OSH Park:

CS42448 Audio, 6 Inputs, 8 Outputs

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Teensy: TDM Support For Many-Channel Audio I/O

Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

Shared project from Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen on OSH Park:

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Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board

A known good reference board for testing the MKL04 chip when building a DIY Teensy 3.6. Refer to this table for the differences between Teensy 3.6 and other models. The soldering friendly LQFP package (at least more friendly than BGA) is used on this board.

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Parts Placement Diagram

Bill Of Materials

1   MK66FX1M0VLQ18
1   IC_MKL04Z32_TQFP32
1   USB A Connector
1   USB Mini B Connector
1   Micro SD Socket
1   MCP1825S Voltage Regulator
1   TPD3S014 USB Power Switch
1   Crystal, 16 MHz
1   Crystal, 32.768 kHz
3   Diode, Schottky, B120
1   Capacitor, 100uF, 6.3V
4   Capacitor, 4.7uF
10  Capacitor, 0.1uF
1   Resistor, 100K
2   Resistor, 470
2   Resistor, 220
2   Resistor, 33
1   Pushbutton
2   Test Point, Black
Teensy 3.6 DIY Reference Board