Micro:Boy – Arcade games for the Micro:bit

ɖҿϝիɟթվ created this project to play arcade games on the Micro:bit:



The Micro:bit is a pretty decent platform for teaching kids to program, but you can’t really make arcade-style games for it. You only have two buttons and a 5×5 display. Perhaps enough for a very small snake game, but that’s pretty much it. That’s why I started working on #PewPew FeatherWing as an alternative platform, but at some point I started wondering if it’s really impossible to do it on the micro:bit.


When the most recent version of micropython got the ability to use any pins for I2C, I realized that I can finally connect a display easily. I could use a HT16K33 and a 8×8 LED matrix like on the PewPew, but I decided to try something else — a monochrome OLED display, similar to the one used on many Arduino-based game consoles.

Micro:Boy – Arcade games for the Micro:bit

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color OLED

Assembly instructions on Mike Rankin’s blog:

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color Oled


Design files and source are available on GitHub:



This Sensor Board is yet another variation of another one on my site. It is not for sale with no real purpose in mind but the design files to make your own are here. The project was created as design challenge. My full time job is pcb design work and as a hobby I enjoy experimenting with new design ideas.


This was one of the more challenging designs I’ve worked on in a while. A few times I’d given up on routing it. Evan using four routing layers I found it tough. The idea was to hide the bezel of the display behind the board but have sensor components on that same board. It would look something like a little tiny television with all the components around the edges.


This latest revision has fixed a few issues I found on previous versions but the design idea can possibly help others in some way. Full credit goes to Adafruit for publishing the Feather M0 design files along with the bootloader. I used the Feather design to create the schematic for my board.

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color OLED

pockeTETRIS: compact Tetris clone using ATtiny85 and OLED

[dombeef] originally built pocketTETRIS as a Father’s Day gift for his Tetris-loving pops. However, having finished the project he’s decided to share it with the universe, and it’s looking rather sweet. He made the game the smallest he could make, with size limitations imposed by a 0.96” OLED display, the coin-cell battery pack, and his desire…

via Mini Tetris Game Packs a Tiny85 — Hackaday

pockeTETRIS: compact Tetris clone using ATtiny85 and OLED

SSD1306 1.3″ OLED SPI breakout board

Rene van der Meer designed this breakout board for a bare OLED display:


SSD1306 1.3″ OLED SPI breakout board

I’ve been playing with cheap OLED display breakouts for years, incorporating complete boards into my projects – an easy, but bulky solution. Now that I’ve had some practice designing circuits and PCBs, it’s time for my next challenge: soldering the display FPCs directly to my own boards.


I designed this board to try out a minimal circuit before integrating it into any larger projects, and to figure out the best way to solder flexible circuits to my boards. Since all of my new microcontroller-powered board designs only require 3.3 V, I haven’t added any 5 V tolerant level shifting. What’s left is a bare minimum circuit to drive a Solomon Systech SSD1306 using SPI at 3.3 V.


golemparts has shared the board on OSH Park:

SSD1306 SPI Breakout v1.0 A

Order from OSH Park

SSD1306 1.3″ OLED SPI breakout board