µGame by Radomir Dopieralski

Radomir Dopieralski has created handheld game console programmable with (Micro/Circuit)Python:

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µGame

A small game console directly programmable in Python. I always wanted to make this, and after my work on #PewPew FeatherWing I finally decided that I’m ready.

The first version may be a bit of a stretch — I tried to make it as small as possible, fitting in the 5x5cm limit of PCB manufacturers, so that it will be cheap to make the PCBs. Using the cheap ST7735 TFT display, and a cheap ATSAMD21E chip. I also tried to put all the components on one side of the board, but failed with that — the power and reset switch had to go on the back, as well as the buzzer.

 

 

µGame by Radomir Dopieralski

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color OLED

Assembly instructions on Mike Rankin’s blog:

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color Oled

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Design files and source are available on GitHub:

mike-rankin/SAMD21G18A_Sensor_Board_with_Color_Oled

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This Sensor Board is yet another variation of another one on my site. It is not for sale with no real purpose in mind but the design files to make your own are here. The project was created as design challenge. My full time job is pcb design work and as a hobby I enjoy experimenting with new design ideas.

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This was one of the more challenging designs I’ve worked on in a while. A few times I’d given up on routing it. Evan using four routing layers I found it tough. The idea was to hide the bezel of the display behind the board but have sensor components on that same board. It would look something like a little tiny television with all the components around the edges.

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This latest revision has fixed a few issues I found on previous versions but the design idea can possibly help others in some way. Full credit goes to Adafruit for publishing the Feather M0 design files along with the bootloader. I used the Feather design to create the schematic for my board.

SAMD21G Sensor Board with Color OLED

Workshop: Assembling the Tinusaur Kit in Varna, Bulgaria

This Saturday, September 2nd, we will have one day workshop for assembling the Tinusaur kits for those who supported our Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. It will take place in Varna, Bulgaria, our host will be VarnaLab – the local hackerspace. We will learn the basics of electronic components, microcontrollers – ATtiny85 in particular and, of course, […]

via Workshop: Assembling the Tinusaur Kit in Varna, Bulgaria — The Tinusaur Project

Workshop: Assembling the Tinusaur Kit in Varna, Bulgaria

pockeTETRIS: compact Tetris clone using ATtiny85 and OLED

[dombeef] originally built pocketTETRIS as a Father’s Day gift for his Tetris-loving pops. However, having finished the project he’s decided to share it with the universe, and it’s looking rather sweet. He made the game the smallest he could make, with size limitations imposed by a 0.96” OLED display, the coin-cell battery pack, and his desire…

via Mini Tetris Game Packs a Tiny85 — Hackaday

pockeTETRIS: compact Tetris clone using ATtiny85 and OLED

ATXMega32E5 adapted for a breadboard

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ATXMega32E5 breakout board

The ATXMega32E5 is the next step up for those experienced with the AVR series of microcontrollers from Microchip (formerly Atmel). They use the same compilers and libraries as the rest of the AVR 8- and 16-bit families, but they can run at 32 MHz and have an amazingly powerful set of internal peripherals that can take your projects to the next level and beyond.

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For prototyping, however, the disadvantage is that the XMega chips are not available as through-hole parts. That’s where this breakout board comes into play.

nsayer has shared the board on OSH Park:

ATXMega_E5 breakout v1.0

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Order from OSH Park

ATXMega32E5 adapted for a breadboard

Orthrus: secure two-card storage

From Nick Sayer on Hackaday.io:

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Orthrus: SD card secure RAID USB storage

This project is a hardware mechanism to provide secure “two man control” over a data store. It is a USB microSD card reader, but it requires two cards. The data is striped in the style of RAID 0, but the data is also encrypted with a key that is stored in a key storage block on each card. In essence, each card is useless without the other. With possession of both cards, the data is available without restriction, but with only one, the remaining data is completely opaque.

This allows you to securely transport a data set by writing it onto a pair of cards and separately transporting them to a destination for recombination.

The intent is that only the pairing of two cards becomes in any way special. A card pair could be inserted in any Orthrus device and the data would be made available. But with only one card, all you get is half of the data encrypted with a key which you only half-possess.

The firmware source code is available on GitHub:

githubnsayer/Orthrus

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The assembled board is available on Tindie:

Screenshot from 2017-05-05 18-25-42

Orthrus: secure two-card storage

EEEmu SPI

Blecky’s latest project on Hackaday.io is an EEPROM/Flash emulator with a fun name:

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EEEmu SPI

The EEEmu SPI emulates any Serial Peripheral Interface Bus EEPROM or Flash memory chipsets up to an interface speed of 25MHz. It also supports any supply and interface voltage between 1.8 to 5 Volts and can be configured to support even the largest of memory sizes.

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This repository contains configurations for all the currently supported EEPROM and Flash chips for the EEEmu SPI:

githubEEEmu/Supported-Devices

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EEEmu SPI