DIY Gaming Handheld Powered by C.H.I.P.

From the Next Thing Co blog:

Community Made: Groboy is a DIY Gaming Handheld Powered by C.H.I.P. Pro

Groboy, created by Groguard, is a C.H.I.P. Pro-powered handheld system designed to run retro console emulators and games on the go.

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It’s also a testament to the open source community, readily available data sheets and manufacturing houses, and the tenacity to teach yourself engineering. Groguard, like many of us, is self-taught and pursuing his passion for making through custom projects.

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After 4 revisions of the board, Groguard had the design where he wanted it. The custom OSH Park PCB at the heart of Groboy routes signal lines from the 2.8″ TFT display, headphones jack, internal 2500mAh LiPo battery (he estimates 3-5 hours of battery life, though he’s not rigorously tested it), and the PCA9555 I2C GPIO expander, which manages inputs from the 11 onboard buttons, to the respective input and output pins on C.H.I.P. Pro.

DIY Gaming Handheld Powered by C.H.I.P.

Vectrex cartridge board

From Frank Buss on hackaday.io:

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Vectrex cartridge

This is my first version of a PCB for building a Vectrex cartridge. I used this for my Kickstarter project for the Bloxorz game. The PCB was manufactured by @oshpark , you can order your board here.

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It fits in this 3D printed case from Thingiverse (you can order it here in my Shapeways shop), or in one of the nice new injection molded cartridge shells from Sean Kelly

Frank has launched a Kickstarter campaign:

FrankBuss has shared the board on OSH Park:

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Order from OSH Park

Vectrex cartridge board

LAMEBOY: another ESP12 handheld

davedarko designed this portable ESP12 project with battery charging and power muxing:
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LAMEBOY – another ESP12 handheld

Ever since Nokia 3310 / 5110 display board I’ve wanted to slap on an ESP module and some buttons to make a nice little portable handheld. Now with some googling and checking out other projects how they get their stuff done and a bit time on hand while on vacation I’m using every spare minute to work on this PCB. There are some minor things I’m not sure about that need testing, but the general concept is clear. 
LAMEBOY: another ESP12 handheld

6502 Expansion Board for Z80 Homebrew

Alasdair Allan writes on Hackster.io:

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A 6502-Based Expansion Board for a Z80-Based Homebrew Computer

Up till now I haven’t seen a 6502-based board, and now I’m seeing both at once—a 6502-based expansion board for a Z80-based homebrew computer.   Ben Chong, over at Ancient Computing, has done a lot of work around Spencer Owen’s RC2014 Z80 microcomputer kit, including designing an improved Z80 processor card and a 16550 UART board.

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the 6502-based CPU board he’s put together is by far the most impressive. On his site Ben outlines his design process, and deep dives into how he got a 6502-based card to talk to a Z80-based system. This isn’t a trivial feat as the two processors have very different design philosophies—with the 6502 using a strict synchronous bus, and the Z80 using a loosely asynchronous bus. He then talks about software before doing some crude performance testing.

The hardware design files are available on GitHub:

ancientcomputing/rc2014

Screenshot from 2017-08-28 01-38-11

ancientcomputing has also shared many projects on OSH Park:

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6502 Expansion Board for Z80 Homebrew

Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

From on the Hackaday log:
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Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

With its backlit color screen and Master System compatibility, the Game Gear was years ahead of its main competition. The major downside was that it tore through alkaline batteries quickly, and for that reason the cheaper but less equipped Game Boy was still able to compete.  Since we live in the future, however, the Game Gear has received new life with many modifications that address its shortcomings, including this latest one that adds an HDMI output.

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Here is a video of it in action:

Very early prototype using my GBA HDMI board to get a 1280x720p output from the Game Gear.

The custom PCB uses a Spartan6 FPGA to convert the Game Gear’s 160×144 12-bit RGB video into a 1280x720p HDMI output using a 4x integer scale. HDMI video is generated directly from the FPGA, audio is taken from the Game Gear’s headphone jack.

It has some pixel glitches, but it could be due to the wiring as it’s very sensitive to positioning. The Game Gear was bought as a “broken” unit and is in need of a cap replacement, that could also be causing issues.

Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console

We’re excited about this new project from Piotr Esden-Tempski of 1BitSquared on Hackaday.io:
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1Bitsy 1UP

1Bitsy 1UP is a retro inspired handheld game console, the design is based on the 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 ARM Cortex-M4F 168MHz 192kb RAM and 1MB Flash micro controller. 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch, SDCard Reader and a few other components.

The display used is a TFT LCD with I2C CapTouch and ILI9341 driver. (should be compatible with the display sold by Adafruit on their breakouts as well as the buydisplay.com 2.8″ tft with CapTouch sensor)

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The most basic design consists of:

  • 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 (168MHz, 192kb RAM, 1MB Flash)
  • 240×320 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch and PWM backlight control
  • D-Pad, ABXY, Start, Select buttons
  • DAC audio out to headphones. (speakers optional)
  • SDCard connected over SDIO interface

The hardware design files and firmware source code are available on GitHub:

github1bitsy/1bitsy-1up

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console