Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

From on the Hackaday log:
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Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

With its backlit color screen and Master System compatibility, the Game Gear was years ahead of its main competition. The major downside was that it tore through alkaline batteries quickly, and for that reason the cheaper but less equipped Game Boy was still able to compete.  Since we live in the future, however, the Game Gear has received new life with many modifications that address its shortcomings, including this latest one that adds an HDMI output.

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Here is a video of it in action:

Very early prototype using my GBA HDMI board to get a 1280x720p output from the Game Gear.

The custom PCB uses a Spartan6 FPGA to convert the Game Gear’s 160×144 12-bit RGB video into a 1280x720p HDMI output using a 4x integer scale. HDMI video is generated directly from the FPGA, audio is taken from the Game Gear’s headphone jack.

It has some pixel glitches, but it could be due to the wiring as it’s very sensitive to positioning. The Game Gear was bought as a “broken” unit and is in need of a cap replacement, that could also be causing issues.

Game Gear HDMI with SNES Controller

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console

We’re excited about this new project from Piotr Esden-Tempski of 1BitSquared on Hackaday.io:
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1Bitsy 1UP

1Bitsy 1UP is a retro inspired handheld game console, the design is based on the 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 ARM Cortex-M4F 168MHz 192kb RAM and 1MB Flash micro controller. 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch, SDCard Reader and a few other components.

The display used is a TFT LCD with I2C CapTouch and ILI9341 driver. (should be compatible with the display sold by Adafruit on their breakouts as well as the buydisplay.com 2.8″ tft with CapTouch sensor)

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The most basic design consists of:

  • 1Bitsy STM32F415RGT6 (168MHz, 192kb RAM, 1MB Flash)
  • 240×320 2.8″ TFT with capacitive touch and PWM backlight control
  • D-Pad, ABXY, Start, Select buttons
  • DAC audio out to headphones. (speakers optional)
  • SDCard connected over SDIO interface

The hardware design files and firmware source code are available on GitHub:

github1bitsy/1bitsy-1up

1Bitsy 1UP handheld game console

Pi0CKET-tiny

From moosepr on Hackaday.io:

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Pi0CKET-tiny

Possibly the worlds smallest Pi based gaming device!

 

Our 0.8mm thickness 2 layer service was used to make it as slim as possible:

 

The designs for a 3-D printed case are shared on the Hackaday.io project page:

 

 

Pi0CKET-tiny

“Ye Olde Nowt” Raspberry Pi Game Console

From Radomir Dopieralski on Hackaday.io:

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Ye Olde Nowt

Yet another pi zero retro handheld game console.

Quantity Component name
1 Raspberry Pi Zero
1 1.5″ SSD1351 Display Module
2 Small SMD Speakers
2 33nF SMD Capacitor
2 1µF SMD Capacitor
2 150kΩ SMD Resistor
2 270kΩ SMD Resistor
6 Buttons
6 90° Buttons
1 ZeroLiPO
1 1S LiPo Battery

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“Ye Olde Nowt” Raspberry Pi Game Console

Flash Memory Adapter for Game Boy

J.Rodrigo created this adapter board make it easier to flash a Game Boy cartridge:

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Flash Memory Adapter for some Game Boy Cartridges

You only need to solder 3 or 4 wires and the adapter board to an old cartridge, PCB adapter boards are manufactured on OSH park to ensure the best quality of castellations.

Compatible Cartridges:

  • DMG-A02-01: MBC5 + ROM (256/512/1024 KB) + RAM (32KB) + Battery
  • DMG-A06-01: MBC5 + ROM (256/512/1024 KB) + RAM (8KB) + Battery
  • DMG-A07-01: MBC5 + ROM (256/512/1024 KB)

JRodrigo has shared the board on OSH Park:

Flash Memory Adapter for Game Boy

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Order from OSH Park

Flash Memory Adapter for Game Boy