A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board

Early this year, the world of electronics saw something amazing. The RISC-V, the first Open Source microcontroller was implemented in silicon, and we got an Arduino-derived dev board in the form of the HiFive 1. The HiFive 1 is just a bit shy of mindblowing; it’s a very fast microcontroller that’s right up there with…

via A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board — Hackaday

A Smaller, Cheaper RISC V Board

Pidgeon 1 Sub-GHz Radio

Pidgeon 1 on Crowd Supply is a sub-GHz radio with 500 mW transmission power, RS485 networking interface and a STM32F0 microcontroller:
front-and-back_jpg_project-body

Crowd Supply: Pidgeon 1

No more restrictions from high level software! Access the lowest level of digital radio transmission with this programmable sub-GHz wireless module.

Hardware Specifications:

  • Radio – CC1120 + CC1190
  • Controller – STM32F051K6
  • FTDI USB interface – FT234XD-R
  • RS485 interface – LTC2850IDD
  • Buck converter – RT8010GQW
  • SMA connector for antenna
Pidgeon 1 Sub-GHz Radio

OnChip Open-V Arduino Compatibility

OnChip has posted a Crowd Supply update on their plans for Arduino compatibility:

arduino-open-v_jpg_project-body.jpg

Open-V Arduino Compatibility

Arduino compatibility can mean a lot of things to a lot of different people, so we’ll try to be as concrete and specific as possible. For the Open-V, Arduino development tools, and interoperating on a hardware level with existing Arduino shields.

wire-bonds-zoomed_jpg_project-body.jpg

We’ve updated our live, web-streamed demos to include an Arduino mode in addition to the assembler and C modes we already have. You might also notice the relatively new Blockly modes and a refined layout of the demo page. Go write some code and see the results live streamed!

Screenshot at 2017-02-12 20-18-49.png

OnChip Open-V Arduino Compatibility

thingSoC Grovey on Crowd Supply

thingsoc_modelthingSoC is an Open Source socket system for IoT development and has just launched a new Crowdy Supply campaign:

thingSoC “Grovey”

Build any IoT or Networked device you can imagine!

c24rwnwveaaa4cm

The thingSoC Grovey! platform gives you the freedom to choose from hundreds of existing sensors, actuators, and radios to quickly create new electronic systems, in plug together configurations that were not possible before. Easily mix together different CPUs, Radios, and Peripherals, like Servos, Motors, Relays, Sound and Lights, and then program them in your choice of Integrated Development Environments (IDE).

The thingSoC Grovey! series combines access to the Seeedstudio Grove system, and the Mikrobus “Click” system, to give you the widest selection of radios, sensors, and actuators available today.

The thingSoC Grovey Series files are available on GitHub:

thingSoC Grovey on Crowd Supply

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the…

via Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web — Hackaday

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop

screenshot-from-2016-12-23-13-01-21

Elkim Roa of OnchipUIS presented recently at the 5th RISC-V Workshop on the latest news of the Open-V open silicon microcontroller and their YoPuzzle educational platform:

YoPuzzle: A mRISC V development platform for next generations

Slides from the his talk:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Live Demos Over the Internet

You can now program real Open-V dev boards from anywhere in the world and see the results on a live video feed! Here’s our first demo – blinking the dev board LEDs.

screenshot-from-2016-12-23-13-00-31Go to http://onchip.uis.edu/ to remotely program the demo board:

Screenshot from 2016-12-20 17-42-04.png

 

 

 

 

Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop

The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

dieimage.png

Hackaday reports that OnChip launched a Crowd Supply campaign:

mRISC-V: The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

Now, this is finally changing. OnChip, a startup from a group of doctoral students at the Universidad Industrial de Santander in Colombia, have been working on mRISC-V, an open 32-bit microcontroller based on the RISC-V instruction set [..]

cx4qfdhw8aa7ih-jpglarge

Open-V Chip Specifications

  • Package
    • QFN-32
    • No other packages are planned for the first run
  • Processor
    • RISC-V ISA version 2.1
    • 1.2 V operation
  • Memory
    • 8 KB SRAM
  • Clock
    • 32 KHz – 160 MHz
    • Two PLLs, user-tunable with muxers and frequency dividers
    • includes all clocking and bias circuitry
  • Analog Signals
    • Two 10-bit ADC channels, each running at up to 10 MS/s
    • Two 12-bit DAC channels
  • Timers
    • One general-purpose 16-bit timer
    • One 16-bit watch dog timer (WDT)
  • General Purpose Input/Ouput
    • 16 programmable GPIO pins
    • two external interrupts
  • Interfaces
    • SDIO port (e.g., microSD)
    • Two SPI ports
    • I2C
    • UART
  • Programming and Testing
    • Built-in debug module for use with gdb and JTAG
    • Programmable PRBS-31/15/7 generator and checker for interconnect testing
    • Compatible with the Arduino IDE

onchip-dev-board-render_jpg_project-body

Open-V Dev Board Specifications

The dev board comes completely assembled.

  • USB 2.0 controller
  • 1.2 V and 3.3 V voltage regulators
  • Clock reference
  • Breadboard-compatible breakout header pins
  • microSD receptacle
  • Micro USB connector (power and data)
  • JTAG connector
  • 32 KB EEPROM
  • 32-pin QFN Open-V microcontroller
  • Dimensions: 55 mm x 30 mm (excluding USB receptacle)
The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller