OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

The Free and Open Source Silicon (FOSSi) Foundation fosters open source ​ semiconductor design​ and we’re proud to have become a sponsor!  Julius Baxter writes on the FOSSi Foundation blog:fossi_logo_large

OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

We are pleased to announce that OSH Park, the purveyors of perfect purple PCBs, have become sponsors of the FOSSi Foundation’s activities. We are very grateful for their support and would like to recognize this by listing them on our Sponsors page at the Bronze tier.

We are actively looking for sponsors for the Foundation, if you’re interested in learning more about our activities and why we are looking for sponsorship, then please visit our sponsorship page and for more, see our detailed sponsorship proposal document.

More information on the FOSSi Foundation:

Inspired by the success of open source software, the Foundation will help bring about IP and tools of comparable quality to proprietary offerings, and which are developed according to an open source model by a highly collaborative and inclusive community. The FOSSi Foundation will address the issues the field currently faces; fragmentation, legal uncertainty, design quality, and high barriers to entry.

FOSSi has launched LibreCores:

Screenshot from 2017-06-14 20-41-11.png

gateway to free and open source digital designs and other components that you can use and re-use in your digital designs.

FOSSi also organizes the ORConf:

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We’re pleased to announce that ORConf 2017 will be held between September 8th and September 10th in Hebden Bridge in the UK.

Past talks are on the FOSSi Foundation’s YouTube channel such as this introduction from last year (jump to 1:59):

OSH Park sponsors the FOSSi Foundation

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the…

via Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web — Hackaday

Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop


Elkim Roa of OnchipUIS presented recently at the 5th RISC-V Workshop on the latest news of the Open-V open silicon microcontroller and their YoPuzzle educational platform:

YoPuzzle: A mRISC V development platform for next generations

Slides from the his talk:

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Live Demos Over the Internet

You can now program real Open-V dev boards from anywhere in the world and see the results on a live video feed! Here’s our first demo – blinking the dev board LEDs.

screenshot-from-2016-12-23-13-00-31Go to http://onchip.uis.edu/ to remotely program the demo board:

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Open-V and YoPuzzle at RISC-V Workshop

The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller


Hackaday reports that OnChip launched a Crowd Supply campaign:

mRISC-V: The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller

Now, this is finally changing. OnChip, a startup from a group of doctoral students at the Universidad Industrial de Santander in Colombia, have been working on mRISC-V, an open 32-bit microcontroller based on the RISC-V instruction set [..]


Open-V Chip Specifications

  • Package
    • QFN-32
    • No other packages are planned for the first run
  • Processor
    • RISC-V ISA version 2.1
    • 1.2 V operation
  • Memory
    • 8 KB SRAM
  • Clock
    • 32 KHz – 160 MHz
    • Two PLLs, user-tunable with muxers and frequency dividers
    • includes all clocking and bias circuitry
  • Analog Signals
    • Two 10-bit ADC channels, each running at up to 10 MS/s
    • Two 12-bit DAC channels
  • Timers
    • One general-purpose 16-bit timer
    • One 16-bit watch dog timer (WDT)
  • General Purpose Input/Ouput
    • 16 programmable GPIO pins
    • two external interrupts
  • Interfaces
    • SDIO port (e.g., microSD)
    • Two SPI ports
    • I2C
    • UART
  • Programming and Testing
    • Built-in debug module for use with gdb and JTAG
    • Programmable PRBS-31/15/7 generator and checker for interconnect testing
    • Compatible with the Arduino IDE


Open-V Dev Board Specifications

The dev board comes completely assembled.

  • USB 2.0 controller
  • 1.2 V and 3.3 V voltage regulators
  • Clock reference
  • Breadboard-compatible breakout header pins
  • microSD receptacle
  • Micro USB connector (power and data)
  • JTAG connector
  • 32 KB EEPROM
  • 32-pin QFN Open-V microcontroller
  • Dimensions: 55 mm x 30 mm (excluding USB receptacle)
The First Open Source RISC-V Microcontroller