Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 2018

If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

When you can get a decent (but let’s be clear, not great) 3D printer for $200 USD, it’s no surprise that American and European manufacturers are having a hard time staying competitive. But not everyone is seduced by low-cost printers. They know they could buy a decent printer for a couple hundred bucks, but for them that’s not the point. Some hackers are just as (if not more) interested in designing and building the machines than they are churning out little plastic boats with the finished product.

Luckily for us, these are also the type of folks who document their builds and make all their collected information and design files available for others under an open source license. Such builders exemplify the true spirit of the RepRap movement, and we’re happy to report that in a sea of imported printers, there were several interesting home built open source printers.

Whether you want to build your own copy of one of these machines, or simply get inspired by some of the ideas their creators had, these machines are physical proof that just because you can order a cheap 3D printer on eBay right now doesn’t mean you have to.

via Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18 — Hackaday

Quote

Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

UPDATE: Thomas Sanladerer interviews Elias Bakken about the Revolve board

writes on the Hackaday blog:

Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

It’s understood that 3D printers and CNC machines need to control motors, but there are a few other niceties that are always good to have. It would be great if the controller board ran Linux, had support for a nice display, and had some sort of networking. The usual way of going about this is either driving a CNC machine from a desktop, or by adding a Raspberry Pi to a 3D printer.

IMG_20180323_172921

The best solution to this problem is to just drive everything from a BeagleBone. This will give you Linux, and with a few motor drivers you can have access to the fancy PRUs in the BeagleBone giving you fast precise control. For the last few years, the Replicape has been the board you need to plug a BeagleBone into a few motors. Now, there’s a better, cheaper solution. At the Midwest RepRap Festival this weekend, [Elias Bakken] has unveiled the Revolve, a single board that combines Octavo Systems’ OSD3358 ‘BeagleBone On A Chip’ with silent TMC2130 motor drivers from Trinamic. It’s an all-in-one 3D printer controller board that runs Linux.

 

The specs for the Revolve are more or less exactly what you would expect for a BeagleBone with a 3D printer controller. The main chip is the Octavo Systems OSB3358, there are six TMC2130 stepper drivers from Trinamic connected directly to the PRUs, 4 GB of eMMC, 4 USB host ports, 10/100 Ethernet, 1080p HDMI out, and enough headers for all the weird and wonderful 3D printers out there. The software is based on Redeem, a daemon that simply turns G-code into spinning motors and switching MOSFETs.

 

The price hasn’t been set, but [Elias] expects it to be somewhere north of $100, and a bit south of $150. That’s not bad for a board that effectively does everything from online printer monitoring to real-time motion control. There’s no date for the release of this board, but as with most things involving 3D printer, the best place to check for updates is Google+.

You can also checkout the official product page for more info:

Revolve: Replicape has evolved

Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

Midwest RepRap Fest this weekend

11The world’s biggest open source hardware 3-D printer festival is this weekend in Goshen, Indiana (USA):

2c4ebd1e-fb4a-4343-80f4-f38f9464c57c

2018 Midwest RepRap Festival (MRRF)

Friday, March 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM  Sunday, March 25, 2018 at 6:00 PM (EDT)

What is MRRF?   It’s the worlds largest celebration of open source 3D printing with over 1,000 people from around the globe attending in 2017.   If you are a hobbyists, enthusiast or any level of user of 3D printing then come on out and enjoy the weekend with others.  Not sure what 3D printing is or want to learn more about it?  Perfect!  Come out and see what it’s all about.

Screenshot from 2018-03-22 13-42-07

Hackaday has a great recap of MRRF last year:

The Midwest RepRap Festival Spectacular

31.jpg

Check out the MRRF newsletter for the latest details and follow MRRF on Twitter.  And look for our Drew Fustini this weekend who will, of coruse, be wearing purple and carrying lots of OSH Park coupons to share!

Midwest RepRap Fest this weekend

Win Big Prizes With Repairs You Can Print

 writes in the latest Hackaday Links:

Are you a student? Are you part of a hackerspace? We have a contest going on right now where you can win a fancy new Prusa i3 MK3.

We’re looking for functional repairs of items around your house, office, or garage. Did you repair something with a 3D printer? Then you too can get in on the action!

The Repairs You Can Print contest

2539161516057355433.png

Check out the list of entries:

d

 

 

Win Big Prizes With Repairs You Can Print

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

 writes on the Tindie blog:

okay2-Medium

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

Take a look at Tindie’s thriving sound section and you’ll see there is no shortage of people making their own electronic music. These devices take many forms, and one interesting take on sound creation is the OKAY 2 Synth DIY Kit. At face value it features 2 octaves of keys, a built-in amplifier along with a 1/4″ line out, and knobs to select the octaves that you’d like to play — but it gets more interesting under the hood.

Oskitone OKAY 2 from oskitone on Vimeo.

What makes it unique by today’s standards is that it doesn’t use any sort of computer or microcontroller, but instead produces sound using an LM555 timer along with other discreet components for monophonic sound. Given its small size, you could use two at once, perhaps combining them via the line out to be further modified in your synth setup!

In case you’re wondering, the original—or nearly so as it’s version 1.1.1—OKAY is also available. It works largely the same as the OKAY 2, but features only a single octave of keys, and doesn’t have an audio output jack.

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

RAMPS compatible driver module based on DRV8818 by Dean Gouramanis:

Screenshot from 2017-11-15 01-01-04

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

The goal of this project is to fit the DRV8818 driver circuit onto the standard 0.8″ X 0.6″ PCB size used in RAMPS 3D printers. DRV8825 drivers are a popular choice for desktop 3D printers, because they can provide up to 2.5 amps peak current. The DRV8818 is a similar IC capable of driving up to 3.5 amps, but the circuit is too large to fit on PCB using regular methods. Also, without a propper heatsink it will overheat.

Schematic, gerbers and mechanical CAD files are shared on GitHub:

dgouramanis/T18_driver

 
DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

Mr. Runner

Alex Martin is creating a four legged robot with a running bound gait:

9754291472923566463.png

Mr. Runner

The aim of this project is to lower the barrier of entry into dynamic robotics. After seeing Boston Dynamic’s Wildcat I became interested in working on something similar, but was disappointed with what the hobbiest scene had to offer. They all used static locomotion. I wanted it to feel alive!

I hope that if people can see that this style of robotics is reproducible with basic development skills, it will attract a wider range of people to legged robots than just those who want to see a vaguely spider looking device re-implement the same kinematic equations over and over again.

371011500859268418.jpg

The approach is based on the work of Fumiya Iida and Rolf Pfiefer at the University of Zurich in the mid 2000’s. Dr. Pfeifer is well known in the field of embodied cognitive science, and these experiments were an attempt to generate movement in quadruped robots based on those principles.

Mr. Runner