Maker Faire New York meetups this week

Here’s a list of meetups that may be of interest to those that are in New York for World Maker Faire week and weekend:

Thursday, September 20th:

6:30pm – 8:30pm: Kickstarter x Hackaday: HACK TUNES

Join us on Thursday, September 20th for a special pre-Maker Faire Meetup! Hackaday MakeIt NYC is once again teaming up with our friends at Kickstarter, this time bringing you a night of awesome music hacks, snacks and more!

7:00 pm – 10:00 pm: Pre-Maker Faire Meetup at Fat Cat Fab Lab

We’re heading East! Join MatterHackers, Ultimaker, and more community friends to kick off Maker Faire New York at Fat Cat Fab Lab for a discussion on different kinds of “Make” with some of your favorite Content Creators. Pizza, refreshments, and great conversation will be provided! All ages are allowed for this portion of the event.

11:00pm – 2:00am: Midnight Games at Hack Manhattan

Join the Hack Manhattan “night crew” for some early morning boardgames. In the city that never sleeps, night owls and insomniacs congregate to draw cards, toss dice, move pieces, calculate odds and bluff opponents.

Friday, September 21th:

9:00 pm – 1:00 am: Bring-A-Hack at the The Leaf

To celebrate our 10 year anniversary and our love of cool hardware hacks, join us for a #BringAHack event in the Big Apple! Join BeagleBoard.org for a casual evening of drinks, snacks and hacks at the Leaf Bar the night before Maker Faire New York.

Saturday, September 22nd:

6:00pm – 9:00pm: DIY Content Creators meetup

Hosted by Make Jagger

Where: Mikkeller Brewing NYC, 123-01 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY 11368

8:00pm – 12:00am: NY Maker Faire After Party

It’s Saturday night at Maker Faire NY and Manhattan is…too darn far! So we’re hanging out at the only rooftop bar in Flushing with a gorgeous view of the city skyline.

MatterHackers, BuildTak, and Fillamentum invite you to a casual cocktail meetup just 10 minutes from Maker Faire. Bring your friends and “make” new ones (…see what we did there?) as we celebrate Maker Faire!

Look for our Drew Fustini in purple!

Maker Faire New York meetups this week

Monoprice Mini Converted to Pick and Place (Kinda)

Would you believe that you can take a cheap 3D printer and easily convert it into a full function pick and place machine to help assemble your PCBs? No? Well good, because you can’t. A real pick and place needs all kinds of sensors and logic to identify parts, rotate them, make sure everything is aligned, etc, etc. There’s no way you could just bolt all that onto a cheap 3D printer, and let’s not even talk about the lack of closed loop control.

But if you have a very specific use case, namely a PCB that only has a relatively large single part that doesn’t need to be rotated, [Connor Nishijima] might have a solution for you. He bought a $150 USD Monoprice Mini, and with the addition of a few printed parts, was able to build a machine that drastically cuts down the time it takes for him to build his LED boards. Best of all the modification doesn’t involve any permanent changes to the printer, he can just pop off the vacuum attachment when he wants to print something.

via Monoprice Mini Converted to Pick and Place (Kinda)

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ERRF 18: The Start of Something Great

From  on the Hackaday blog:

ERRF 18: The Start of Something Great

For years, the undisputed king of desktop 3D printing conferences has been the Midwest RepRap Festival (MRRF). Hosted in the tropical paradise that is Goshen, Indiana, MRRF has been running largely unopposed for the top spot since its inception. There are other conferences focused on the industrial and professional end of the 3D printing spectrum, and of course you’d find a Prusa or two popping up at more or less any hacker con; but MRRF is focused on exploring what the individual is capable of once they can manifest physical objects from molten plastic.

But on June 23rd, 2018, MRRF finally got some proper competition. As the name might indicate, the East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) is an event very much inspired by its Hoosier State predecessor. Held in Bel Air, Maryland, hackers on the right side of the United States for the first time had the opportunity to attended a true 3D printing festival without having to get on a plane. Not to say it was a neighborhood block party; people from all over the country, and indeed the globe, descended on the APG Federal Credit Union Arena for the two-day celebration of everything plastic.

This inaugural ERRF was, to put it mildly, a massive success. A couple of Hackaday Field Agents were in attendance, and we definitely came away impressed with the event considering it was the first attempt. We saw evidence that the RepRap dream of printable printers is still going strong, a gaggle of new printers and products that will be prying at your wallet this year, and an American-made hotend that challenges traditional wisdom. Of course we also saw a huge number of 3D printing fanatics who were eager to show off their latest creations.

We have no doubt that ERRF will return again next year, but until then, you’ll have to settle for the following collection of selected highlights from this year’s show.

We’re no strangers to the work [David Shorey] has been doing with 3D printing on fabric, but it’s always awesome to see up close. The concept here is actually quite simple: pause the print after a few layers, pull a piece of tulle (the kind of thing bridal veils are made of) tight over the bed, and then let the print finish. The fabric is caught between the layers of the print, and as long as you aren’t too rough with it, will hold together quite nicely.

[David] wasn’t the only person to have this idea, but he certainly seems to be on the forefront of perfecting it. Perhaps the most interesting element of this technique is that essentially anyone with a 3D printer and a nearby fabric store can try their hand at it.

 

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Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 2018

If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

When you can get a decent (but let’s be clear, not great) 3D printer for $200 USD, it’s no surprise that American and European manufacturers are having a hard time staying competitive. But not everyone is seduced by low-cost printers. They know they could buy a decent printer for a couple hundred bucks, but for them that’s not the point. Some hackers are just as (if not more) interested in designing and building the machines than they are churning out little plastic boats with the finished product.

Luckily for us, these are also the type of folks who document their builds and make all their collected information and design files available for others under an open source license. Such builders exemplify the true spirit of the RepRap movement, and we’re happy to report that in a sea of imported printers, there were several interesting home built open source printers.

Whether you want to build your own copy of one of these machines, or simply get inspired by some of the ideas their creators had, these machines are physical proof that just because you can order a cheap 3D printer on eBay right now doesn’t mean you have to.

via Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18 — Hackaday

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Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

UPDATE: Thomas Sanladerer interviews Elias Bakken about the Revolve board

writes on the Hackaday blog:

Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

It’s understood that 3D printers and CNC machines need to control motors, but there are a few other niceties that are always good to have. It would be great if the controller board ran Linux, had support for a nice display, and had some sort of networking. The usual way of going about this is either driving a CNC machine from a desktop, or by adding a Raspberry Pi to a 3D printer.

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The best solution to this problem is to just drive everything from a BeagleBone. This will give you Linux, and with a few motor drivers you can have access to the fancy PRUs in the BeagleBone giving you fast precise control. For the last few years, the Replicape has been the board you need to plug a BeagleBone into a few motors. Now, there’s a better, cheaper solution. At the Midwest RepRap Festival this weekend, [Elias Bakken] has unveiled the Revolve, a single board that combines Octavo Systems’ OSD3358 ‘BeagleBone On A Chip’ with silent TMC2130 motor drivers from Trinamic. It’s an all-in-one 3D printer controller board that runs Linux.

 

The specs for the Revolve are more or less exactly what you would expect for a BeagleBone with a 3D printer controller. The main chip is the Octavo Systems OSB3358, there are six TMC2130 stepper drivers from Trinamic connected directly to the PRUs, 4 GB of eMMC, 4 USB host ports, 10/100 Ethernet, 1080p HDMI out, and enough headers for all the weird and wonderful 3D printers out there. The software is based on Redeem, a daemon that simply turns G-code into spinning motors and switching MOSFETs.

 

The price hasn’t been set, but [Elias] expects it to be somewhere north of $100, and a bit south of $150. That’s not bad for a board that effectively does everything from online printer monitoring to real-time motion control. There’s no date for the release of this board, but as with most things involving 3D printer, the best place to check for updates is Google+.

You can also checkout the official product page for more info:

Revolve: Replicape has evolved

Turning The Beaglebone On A Chip Into A 3D Printer Controller

Midwest RepRap Fest this weekend

11The world’s biggest open source hardware 3-D printer festival is this weekend in Goshen, Indiana (USA):

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2018 Midwest RepRap Festival (MRRF)

Friday, March 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM  Sunday, March 25, 2018 at 6:00 PM (EDT)

What is MRRF?   It’s the worlds largest celebration of open source 3D printing with over 1,000 people from around the globe attending in 2017.   If you are a hobbyists, enthusiast or any level of user of 3D printing then come on out and enjoy the weekend with others.  Not sure what 3D printing is or want to learn more about it?  Perfect!  Come out and see what it’s all about.

Screenshot from 2018-03-22 13-42-07

Hackaday has a great recap of MRRF last year:

The Midwest RepRap Festival Spectacular

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Check out the MRRF newsletter for the latest details and follow MRRF on Twitter.  And look for our Drew Fustini this weekend who will, of coruse, be wearing purple and carrying lots of OSH Park coupons to share!

Midwest RepRap Fest this weekend

Win Big Prizes With Repairs You Can Print

 writes in the latest Hackaday Links:

Are you a student? Are you part of a hackerspace? We have a contest going on right now where you can win a fancy new Prusa i3 MK3.

We’re looking for functional repairs of items around your house, office, or garage. Did you repair something with a 3D printer? Then you too can get in on the action!

The Repairs You Can Print contest

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Check out the list of entries:

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Win Big Prizes With Repairs You Can Print