And The Winners Are…

Congratulations to the winners of the Maker Faire Purple Board Scavenger Hunt: Not_Beta_NinjaLowVoltageLabs,  DocProfSky,  NWSayer,  and GeorgeIoak!

Prizes included $100 codes and priority access to swift upgrades when available.

 

PurpleShuttle2

Highlights From Bay Area Maker Faire 2015- Part 1

There was too much awesome at the Bay Area Maker Faire for a single post. So, for now, we’ll share some highlights. Stay tuned for more detail on the purple powered projects, pictures, and our brilliant community members!

We had a wonderful time talking with Eric from Kijani Grows. He’s developed kits for indoor and outdoor aquaponics gardens that provide food for individuals and families, and are wonderful for young students learning about ecosystems. Their new program, One School One Garden, is brilliant. The program uses web-based aquaponic gardens that the students build from a kit as a means to promote STEM learning, environmental education, and provide sustainable sources for healthier eating around the globe.

We were excited to find out that the Bionic Galileo Hand, developed by students at the Galileo University in Guatemala City, is currently being used by a few people in physical rehabilitation facilities! The hand features an ARM M4 powered microcontroller, touchscreen, battery Pack, muscle sensors.For more information, please visit Turing Research Lab.

As always, it was a blast to see Sarah and Mark with their LightPlay Robot Army, and chatting with Chris Gammell of Contextual Electronics, and the folks behind Fried Circuits.

Anouk showed off her fabulous, personal-space saving Spider Dress.

Steamy Tech and Nick Sayer of Geppetto Electronics team up to offer awesome wood creations that light up with a variety of effects. During the Faire, Nick soldered components in a custom pattern onto boards that you could pair with a kit from Steamy Tech to create blinky earrings with your choice of wood stain!

I finally got to see the QuickDrawBot in action.

 

Currently on Kickstarter:
Erin Tomson’s project Modulo is nearing the end of its kickstarter campaign. It is currently reaching towards the stretch goal of $75,000 USD!

Arduboy has a few fun rewards once certain stretch goals are reached. Back the project before 20 June 2015, and the unlocked achievements could include: Arduboy’s pcb can be offered in an array of colors that is seen through the clear polycarbonate case, a gold backing for the Arduboy, and Kevin legally changing his name to Arduboy.

 

ArduboyPlay

Announcing The First Annual Maker Faire Purple Board Scavenger Hunt

If you’re attending the Bay Area Maker Faire this weekend, we are excited to invite you to participate in our first official contest for a chance to win prizes!

 

you win cap

Contest Rules:

  • Take pictures of projects you find at Maker Faire featuring OSH Park’s fabulous purple circuit boards. Be sure the circuit board is visible!
  • Send the image via Twitter to @oshpark using the #PurpleFaire hashtag
  • No purchase necessary

Winners will be notified via twitter by Wednesday, May 20th.

Staff Picks for April 2015

We really love projects! Here’s a selection from our shared projects pages that you may have missed.

 

N6480 by mikejmoffitt is a Nintendo 64 480 Scaler. It digitally and double-scans the 15Khz video signal to produce a 480p signal compatible with a VGA monitor.

 

The BNO055+BMP280BreakoutBoard.v02 by PeskyProducts can also function as a Teensy 3.1 shield.

 

PITInfo by hallard is a Shield Teleinfo for Raspberry PI for recovering tele frames. More details are available in the forum.

 

W5KPM‘s Kelduino 5v Only is an arduino clone with a 2.1 mm barrel pcb as power input, regulated 5v supply, and a capacitor in the DTR line allowing for in project programming. A 5v test port serves as a 5v source for other sensors.

 

ESP8266 Plug was designed by Josip Medved, and posted to our shared projects pages by Probebot. The ESP8266 Plug is a USB to serial bridge that enables debugging of a ESP8266 WiFi serial transceiver.

 


Want us to shine the spotlight on your project or do you want to nominate a project not found in the shared pages? Email a short description, a picture, and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks for March 2015

Welcome to our now monthly edition of Staff Picks! We’ve reviewed the projects submitted to the Shared Projects pages and selected five to showcase for you here.

 

This accurately named HeadlightRelayControl board controls automotive headlight relays. It was designed by Jason Pepas and posted on the shared projects pages by BillyPrefect. A circuit board to control automotive headlight relays.

 

Learn to Solder blinking badge submitted to our shared project pages by mkanoap for Hive13.

 

Afterhoursengineering designed this ESP8266 Daughterboard to be a versatile board for use in embedded projects with the requisite power supply and connections to the ESP8266 module.

 

The handheld chiptune player sidstick-gadgetgangster by danringer is a remake of this sidstick, and features the SIDcog v1.3, an emulation of the Commodore 64 sound chip.

 

ildo‘s ATX Breakout Board has dual USB Charging capability. The top and bottom ground layers are stitched together for better heat transfer and reduced noise. The USB bottom port is powered by 5VSB, while the top port is powered by a regular 5V rail fused to 3A. This board is based on ATX PSU Distributor from eMAKERshop, and ATX Breakout Board designed by Francesco Truzzi. EDIT: This is revision A. For revision B of this project, click here.

 

 


Want us to shine the spotlight on your project or do you want to nominate a project not found in the shared pages? Email a short description, a picture, and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks for February 2015

This Arduino Laser Cat Turret, by stuthedew, is an Arduino-based laser automatic cat toy that uses a pan-tilt rig and laser diode. Engage your favorite meowbeast the random laser path, where speed and pauses determined by homebrew Markov chain algorithm. Click the image for to find it on GitHub, or order a pcb from the shared projects page to start making a turret of your very own.

 

 

Willf-j helps meet the need for an accurate, reliable reflow tool, with his cleverly named project “The Reflow Château.” If it looks familiar, that could be because other members in our community recognized its awesomeness and featured it on Hackaday. For a behind the scenes look at bringing this project to life, visit Will’s blog by clicking the image above. You can also click here to find it in our shared projects.

 

The INMP441 I2S Digital Microphone by Pesky Products is a breadboard friendly breakout board for Invensense’s INMP441, a bottom-ported digital microphone that outputs I2S audio as a stream of 24-bit serial words that can be directly read by a Teensy 3.X microcontroller or any microprocessor with an I2S port. Click here to view the shared project page, or click the image above to support this project on Tindie.

 

 

OpenEVSE II HV + Contactor v0.5 by nsayer is a re-designed OpenEVSE. This board connects to an external two-pole 208/240 volt contactor, adjustable to the current you need your charging station to support, bearing in mind that the relay board is only rated for up to 24A of charging current. If you’re a fan of the OpenEVSE project, we recommend reading through the wiki, clicking the image to check out this project over on Tindie, browsing the OpenEVSE store, and/or visiting the shared projects page.

 

 

This Pinguino 45K50 was submitted by MijailR. The Pinguino makes PICs more accessible for project development. This version is based on the PIC18F45K50, which is pin to pin compatible with the older 4550 series, and capable of operating at 5V. Other features include a USB precision integrated oscillator that enables the maker to build USB projects without an external oscillator, and a CTMU unit for measurement applications. Check out the board on our shared projects page by clicking the image above.

 

 

 

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box! Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

 

Please note that the rights of all images belong to their creators unless otherwise stated. The use of these images does not indicate any rights or ownership to any of the images unless specifically mentioned.

Staff Picks For January 2015

Welcome to our first selection of Staff Picks for 2015!

In this edition: netChimes joins the ranks of our top-notch community on the shared project pages, L-Train helps make it possible for you to make your own 96 kHz SNES soundtracks, Rogers Gomez opens the door for beginners into the world of audio projects, and Duncan Lowder does a beautiful job improving his computer’s audio.

 

NetChimes is a worldwide distributed collection of wind actuated instruments capable of sending and receiving state information via Open Sound Control over wide area networks. As individual chimes are struck locally, the action is reported to the network and repeated on a similar set of chimes at a different location, creating a meshnetwork. At the center of the meshnetwork is a single, much larger, set of mother chimes mirroring the action of the entire network with a complementary element for visualizing the information.

 

L-Train designed a shield for the Super Nintendo to output upsampled 96 kHz/24-bit digital audio over SPDIF.

 

Rogers Gomez designed this NP-100v12 hybrid headphone amplifier, which allows “an entry level builder” experience “assembling and listening to their own creation.”

 

This is a very well done USB DAC, upgrade for built-in computer audio uses a TI PCM2707 and has “two LED’s that light up when the DAC is plugged in, one signifying power from the USB bus and another when it has been detected by the computer.”

 

 

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box! Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks

Welcome to our first picks for the new year! From ARM dev to ESC to clocks to soft circuits and embedded projects, our community is filled with wonderful, busy makers  actively creating new projects that we’re excited to shine a purple light on.

 

ARM Pro Mini Ver 1B by zapta helps make ARM development easier with a fully featured IDE, Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows support and eliminating the need for any other programmers and adapters.

 

This Binary Epoch Clock by ManiacalLabs is battery powered and has a relatively simple to assemble design that uses through hole components.

 

VESC – Open Source Electric Speed Controller from Benjamin’s Robotics is safe from 8 volts to 60 volts, allows for sensored or sensorless operation, enables seamless four quadrant motor control, and an increasing number of other useful features. Click the image above for more details on this project.

 

 

Tacuino is a low-cost, modular, Arduino-compatible educational platform from MakersBox. The design allows for you to easily test a working microcontroller circuit with basic inputs and outputs using standard through-hole components prior to snapping it apart and sewing the boards into your soft circuit project.

 

___________________________________________________________

Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box! Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks for 19 December 2014

Welcome back to another edition of Staff Picks! Once again, our extremely creative community develops interesting, beautiful, and useful projects. We’re honored to present a few of them to you here.

The Human Harp attaches the user to the structure via retractable strings, allowing them to play it like a giant instrument. By extending, plucking and moving with these musical strings, the movician can adjust various characteristics of the structure’s voice. Human Harp was initiated by London artist Di Mainstone and is now a global collaboration connecting engineers, dancers, musicians and bridge lovers from around the world

The Human Harp attaches the user to the structure via retractable strings, allowing them to play it like a giant instrument. “By extending, plucking and moving with these musical strings, the movician can adjust various characteristics of the structure’s voice. Human Harp was initiated by London artist Di Mainstone and is now a global collaboration connecting engineers, dancers, musicians and bridge lovers from around the world”. Click here to see it in action.

 

M41T62RTC+MS5637+M24512DFM.v01x by PeskyProducts features an ultra-low-power real time clock combined with a pressure and temperature sensor and EEPROM in a 17.93×7.75mm add-on board for Teensy 3.1!

 

433MHz transmitter add-on by TheAirBoard for The AirBoard, a “thumb-size, Arduino compatible, wireless, ubiquitous computer designed to sketch Internet-of-Things, fast!”

 

DGP – Vox Treble Booster V1.0 by diyguitarpedals is verified! Check out the build kit PDF.

 

Powered by Intel Edison and featuring a splash of purple, Anouk Wipprecht‘s 3D printed Synapse dress and headpiece communicate the wearer’s emotions via lights.

“The dress’s headpiece is fitted with a sensor that track the wearer’s attention level and focus to monitor fluctuations in the wearer’s “internal” mode – where attention level is usually high (around 80%). This functions internally to train your attention span, but also communicates externally by telling others that you are in a high state of focus and “do not disturb” while concentrated on a difficult task…One of the other sensors embedded in the dress monitors proximity: if the wearer feels like someone is invading her personal space, the lights in the dress can give off up to 120 watts of brightness, telling the other person to back off. The dress has a camera on the front that can capture a picture whenever the subject feels either most tense or most relaxed so she can later track what was making her feel that way”

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box! Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Make, Mod, Create

Every day, millions of people are working individually and together to make, mold, and mod the world into a better, more enjoyable place. Crafting the details of Oracle‘s glowing armor, rebuilding a Yak, collecting environmental data, and developing new technology are just a few of the many forms of making. Whether you recognize it or not, dear reader, you are one of them.

Everyone is a maker and our world is what we make it.” – Dale Dougherty

No one is too old to learn a new skill, and breathing life into almost any creation you can imagine is becoming easier. Supplies are more affordable, new tools are more user friendly, websites such as youtube and Instructables bring lessons into your home, and D.I.Y. communities are sprouting like explosive polymerization eliminating the need to be the reclusive tinkerer.

If you are having trouble seeing yourself as a maker, or are toying with the idea of making, but uncertain where to start, try following Adam Savage’s Ten Commandments of Making:

  1. Make something, anything. Getting started can be the most difficult part.
  2. Make something useful.
  3. Start right now. Do a mock up with the tools you currently have available. Never underestimate the versatility of everyday items.
  4. Find a project. Always pick a project that will get you interested in learning a new skill.
  5. Ask for help, advice, and feedback.
  6. Share. Share your techniques, your sources. What are you hiding?
  7. Recognize what you find discouraging, so you can work through it. Acknowledge failure is (usually) part of the project, and an incredibly useful learning tool.
  8. Measure carefully. You can always trim a little more, putting it back can be tricky.
  9. Make things for other people.
  10. Use more cooling fluid. Caring for your tools and using them properly will help them last longer and make using them easier.

 

If you identify as a creative type and want to hang out with other creative types, you might try checking out your local chapter of Dorkbot, drop in for an open house at a makerspace, or if you’re in the Portland area, drop by our Monthly Maker Meetup!

 

Further reading:
What I Wish I Knew About Creativity When I was 20
Adam Savage on Becoming a Maker

Staff Picks for the Week of 1 December 2014

Laser safety, GPS tracking, and more! Our community has been busy. Below are a few of our favorite projects from the past couple of weeks.

 

If we had a “Best Safety Feature” award, it would go to Cereal_Killer for this 17mm Laser contact board. It prevents people from hurting themselves with a laser by reversing the bias, preventing the current from flowing if the battery is inserted + end forward (like how you normally would in a flashlight). 

 

dbtayl‘s Runner’s GPS shows the current distance traveled and the time taken to travel that distance. It was sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s ECE Envision Fund. Recently, this awesome project was featured on Hackaday!

 

Max‘s electronic compass with tilt compensation features 36 blue LEDs and 4 red LEDs that are individually controlled from GPIO on the AVR microcontroller. The project also has a 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis magnetometer.

 

P-MOSFET PWD Shield by SmittyHalibut enables you to switch to the common cathode instead of the common anode. Rather than using a N-Channel MOSFETs like most FET shields, this shield uses P-Channel MOSFETs which switch the positive. This allows it to work with loads that have a common ground (like this aquarium light )

 

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box!

Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Hackaday in Purple

After a brief browsing of project pages at Hackaday, it’s easy to lose count of the amazing number of purple circuit boards! So, we decided to make a link roundup highlighting this outstanding overlap of our communities.

hackadaylogo

While extensive, we found it impossible to list all the projects shared. Did we miss yours? Please leave a link to it in the comment section below.

Daniel Taylor:

Henrik Alexandersson:

Rjpope42:

  • AM/FM Transmitter Pair– A pair of Altoids-tin sized transmitters, designed to be a cheap way to get music to an old device with no audio input.

Fyber Labs: The following projects are largely for their Flex modules, which are “Standard low-cost rigid PCB modules with 2.54mm castellations for breadboard and direct implementation on flexible PCB for wearable projects.”

spetku:

Kevin Krieger:

  • CAN-obd2 started as a way to display and save information from my 2008 Honda Civic’s OBD2 port.

Peter Ogden:

DaveDarko:

  • fixietube clock– 30ml jam jars hopefully turned into beautiful LED displays – nixietube like looking without the higher voltage fuzz – fake LED nixietubes
  • Sonic Screwdriver

i.abdalkader:

  • OpenMV, Python-powered machine vision modules

Peter Jansen:

Mathieu Stephan:

Luke Weston:

  • Simple, low-cost FMCW radar– A basic radar system makes radar accessible at low cost for experiments with range finding & navigation of autonomous aircraft or spacecraft.

Nathaniel VerLee:

Kevin Neubauer:

Paul Stoffregen:

Meizhu:

Thomas Wilson:

Digital Corpus:

askoog89:

  • A Watch, PCB LED Tilt activated watch
  • Tilt Touch Time– A tilt and touch activated wristwatch using a “retro” style bubble 7 segment display.

Ceady:


Jac Goudsmit:

Andreas Dahlberg:

RasmusB:

  • CANPi– CANBUS adapter for the Raspberry Pi

Benchoff:

  • Unhappy Hacking Keyboard– Why have a Happy Hacking Keyboard when you can have an Unhappy Hacking Keyboard. Real programmers only need a 1 and 0 key. Perfect for trying out Cherry MX switches.

Pure Engineering:

Radu Constantin:

  • NANDfarm => RFarmer– Small, easy to use, cheap ZigBee developement board for the internet of things.

Eric Evenchick:

  • seCANt– Hardware to connect to a car’s CAN buses.

DatanoiseTV:

Neven Boyanov:

  • The Tinusaur– The Tinusaur is a small board with ATtiny85 microcontroller and the minimum components to run properly plus shield headers and a battery


Tim Wilkinson:

tshen2:

ehughes:

Fabricate.IO:

Neil Movva:

Johan Lans:

  • MIDI2VC– Connects a MIDI keyboard to an analogue synthesizer

tomcircuit:

Pierce Nichols:

  • MultiSpork– A wireless analog/digital multitool & data recorder

akupila:

  • Captain Pugsley – Smart motion sensor, Smart wifi connected motion tracker & iOS app with a personality!


gamaral:

shimniok:

  • PIPduino, a ‘duino especially for putting in projects.

AndyTallack:

Don Smith:

  • PASS– (personal ambient space sensor) humidity, pressure and temperature logger

Rodmg:

mpare:

megahercas6:

Mandy Zheng:

  • Adapative Nodes– Instant prototyping without a single line of microcontroller code

kd8ssf:

  • ATX-Pi– An unholy marriage of an Arduino, an ATX power supply and a Raspberry Pi.


facelessloser:

  • One button TV remote– A TV remote with one button that cycles thought a list of preset channels based on a attiny85

duanebenson:

JamesW_001:

Staff Picks for the Week of 23 November 2014

From data recording for realistic, repeatable experimentation from energy-harvesting sensors to a D89/USB converter and ESC to affordable hearing assistance, the OSH Park community has you covered!

 

Ekho FEB v2.0 by siahman is the the analog front end pcb for Ekho, “an emulator capable of recording energy harvesting conditions and accurately recreating those conditions in the lab.”

 

Stairs Lights Controller v1.2 by androng uses an ATmega328P to control LED strips to add illumination to your stairs rather than the walls or overhead.

 

CardosoTech.com Uniden DB9 to USB Converter v0.1L by BlitzKriegBR enables users of the Uniden BCD396XT to connect their HTs to a standard USB port without needing  an official Uniden data cable.

 

Use WarHawk-AVG‘s Open BLDC Hardware – Power_Driver board v0.3 for a completely open source brushless DC motor controller.

 

Designed to be worn around the neck with an earphone connected to the 3.5mm barrel jack, Earassistible by Blueberry is an inexpensive, open source, battery powered amplifier that takes a signal from a condenser microphone and drives an earphone.

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box!

Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks

Thank you to our wonderful community members, who share their projects! This week’s favorites range from a VGA converter, USB charge booster and juice jacker preventer, optically isolated 4-channel ARD

 

This Charge Booster – DCP Enumerator/USB Wrapper by WarHawk-AVG acts as a USB Wrapper, preventing juice-jacking since the data connection does not connect to the charging port data pins.

 

nslogan‘s ARD4 v1.0 is an optically-isolated 4-channel automotive relay driver, with 1A output possible per channel. Use a jumper to select between active-high and active-low inputs, and between DB9 or external power for the input side. Also featured is reverse-protection on both the  logic and relay side power. There is a LED across relay driver output that indicates if the relay is getting power. Test points exit for logic and relay power, and for each channel on the logic side. The pcb fits Sick of Beige DP8049 form factor, but should be used with 10mm stand-offs between board and top panel.

 

This RGB2VGA for Altera DE0-Nano by lfantoniosi, is “a FPGA implementation of a RGB to VGA converter using the Altera DE0-Nano board.”

 

x-io has designed a helpful breakboard for the Redpine Signals RS9110-N-11-22 Wi-Fi module, which features pull-down resistors in the design.

 


Want to increase your chances of our picking your project? Make sure to include a link to your project documentation or leave detailed information in the shared project description box!

Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

DIY Light Up Plush Monster Tutorial

Follow the steps below to create a light up monster friend of your very own!

Follow the steps below to create a light up monster friend of your very own!

 

Skill level: Beginning to intermediate

 

Knowledge: Designing a basic circuit with LEDs in parallel and hand sewing a running stitch. If you’re sewing the entire project by hand, a bonus knowledge of blanket stitch for sewing around the edges might be helpful.

 

Supplies:

  • 4 sheets of felt
  • 1 ft tulle or other findings you want to add
  • 2 non-metal buttons
  • spray craft adhesive
  • embroidery floss
  • 2 LEDs
  • CR2032 battery
  • Battery holder (You can either make your own or purchase one like this one from Adafruit)
  • Conductive thread
  • Monster pattern- Draw your own or use one of the many awesome free templates available online

 

Tools:

  • Needle nose pliers
  • Hand sewing needle that fits easily through the contacts of your battery holder
  • Needle threader While not absolutely necessary for some, I find threading the conductive thread or embroidery floss near impossible without one.
  • Scissors
  • Optional: Sewing machine
  • 2 different colored markers

 

Step 1: Trace your template onto the felt and cut it out.

 

Step 2: Decide where to put your LEDs, and draw your circuit using different colored markers for your positive and negative traces.

 

Step 3: Use a straight pin or your hand sewing needle to stab the fabric to loosen it where you want to insert the LED.

Insert your LEDs through the buttons and into the fabric with the negative leads on top and positive on the bottom. This will make sewing your circuit easier.

 

Step 4: Use your needle nose pliers to coil the leads of the LEDs. This will allow you to secure them to the fabric with conductive thread.

 

Step 5: To easily sew our circuit from the LEDs on the front fabric to the battery holder on the back, we’ll need to first use embroidery floss or regular non-conductive thread to sew the top of your monster’s head together.

sew fold original

 

Step 6: Using about 2 feet of conductive thread, sew the negative trace of  your circuit from LED 1 to LED 2 to the battery holder, making certain to secure the leads to your fabric by sewing through the spirals we made earlier. After tying off your thread, add a drop of fray check or clear nail polish on your knot. Wait a few seconds for it to dry, before trimming the excess thread. This will help prevent your knot from unknotting.

hand sew neg1

 

 

Step 7:  Repeat step 6 for the positive trace of your circuit.

 

Step 8: Insert your battery and test the circuit.

test circuit1

 

Step 9: Using embroidery floss, sew any additional features, such as a mouth, eyelashes, or patch work style stitches.

 

Step 10: Using non-conductive thread and either a straight stitch on your sewing machine or a blanket stitch if you’re hand sewing, sew most of the way around your plush friend, leaving a 1-2 inch opening.

 

Step 11: Fill with stuffing and close the opening.

 

Step 12: Enjoy  your new friend!

unlit monster_cropped

 

Useful links:

“Sew thru your hardware not your fabric” instructable by Lynne Bruning

Staff Picks

Our picks from the shared projects pages will help you repurpose those old floppy drives to play music, change your voice, illuminate your Boba Fett cosplay, and create your own battery-powered data logger/ embedded controller!

 

vsergeev‘s ARM Bare Metal Widget is an open hardware Cortex-M0 development board with a focus on battery power, non-volatile storage, and debuggability. It is suitable as a battery-powered data logger or a general purpose embedded controller.

 

Ultimate Voice Changer 0.1 by andygrove  is an Arduino Uno shield providing high speed 12-bit ADC with 8 channels and 12-bit DAC with low-pass filter and audio jack.

 

This circuit for the display on Boba Fett’s chest plate, by thatdecade features multiplexed LEDs. For more details please check out the B.O.M., schematic and source code.

 


Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks

This edition of staff picks is brought to you by repaired fuse bits, sensors, and soft circuits!

The Sensor Node by BunneyDude is a multi-sensor, dual radio, low-power node for a 915MHz/2.4GHz network.

MakersBox‘s SnapNsew is a low-cost sewable microcontroller circuit that allows you to easily create and test a working microcontroller circuit with basic inputs and outputs using standard through-hole components and a printed circuit board. Beginners can purchase the kit, which comes pre-programmed, and snap the pieces apart to sew them into a soft circuit project. More advanced users can use an ISP header to reprogram the ATtiny85.

Room board by Frankalicious features a MSP430G2452IN20, PIR module, phototransistor, and nrf24l01 radio module .

 

Atmega Fusebit Doctor V2h by Greg repairs dead Atmega (and Attiny from v2.04) family AVRs by writing correct fuse bits using the parallel and serial high-voltage programming method.

 


Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Announcing Maker Meetups!

EDIT: Please note that there have been a two changes since we first posted about this event in October, 2014:

  • Meetups are now hosted on the first Tuesday of each month.
  • CymaSpace has moved. They’re new address is: 931 SE 6th Ave Portland, OR

 


 

Don’t ever doubt it, you- yes, you- are a maker. From scrapbookers, writers, Rube Goldberg machine builders, and painters to cosplayers, robot builders, sculptors, programmers, and beyond, we’re all makers.
With this in mind, OSH Park has teamed up with Cymaspace to host Monthly Maker Mondays!

 

Maker Mondays are a collision of worlds, techies and non-techies, that helps build a community of makers, creators, crafters, and DIY-ers of all different ages, backgrounds and skill sets. Welcoming everyone, from the completely curious yet inexperienced beginner to the hobbyists and formally educated professionals, we hope to provide an environment conducive to collaboration, project design, and creation.

 

When: The first Monday of each month. The next meetup will be October 6th, 6-9pm.

WhereCymaspace, 4634 NE Garfield Ave Suite B Portland, OR 97211.
Please enter via the glass door to the right of the front stairs.

 

Travis, Edward, Androo, and Myles collaborate on a project at Cymaspace

Cost: Free!*

*CymaSpace is a non-profit that relies on donations to cover their expenses. We encourage you to give when you can to support the space and help ensure great events like this keep happening.

Questions? Email Cat!

 

Further Reading:

 

 

EDIT 8 October 2014:
Starting in November, the Monthly Maker Meetups will be moved to the first Tuesday of each month.

Staff Picks

Welcome back to a new edition of Staff Picks!

This selection from our community includes a graphics display, a bonus round for Squishy Circuits, an interactive biofeedback installation, and a crazy clock that keeps time for you and your Martian friends.

 

The ILI9431 Display (320×240) for the Teensy 3.1 by PaulStoffregenenables high resolution color graphics, and can be used with the Adafruit_ILI9341 library or the Optimized ILI9341 library.

 

Pulse & Bloom is an interactive biofeedback installation by Saba Ghole, Shilo Shiv Suleman, Rohan Dixit, Heather Stewart, Luke Iseman, and Samuel Clay. The pulses of participants are visualized by illuminated mechanical lotuses, ranging in 8 to 18 feet tall. When a participant presses the pulse sensor, their heartbeat is visualized by flashing lights.

 

Squishy Duino by rexxar-tc improves the Squishy Circuits experience by adding an analog-to-digital converter across the dough. The read voltage will change as people manipulate the dough. This circuit allows for the ADC values to vary the tone of a speaker, or change the individual colors of an RGB LED.

 

This open source hardware and firmware Crazy Clock by nsayer is a DIY novelty clock maker’s dream. A variety of firmware loads allow for your clock to tick “randomly” while keeping perfect time. Most of the options tick 86,400 times per day for the approximate 18-months that your AA will last, with the exception of the Martian clock.

 




Have a project to nominate for our picks of the week? Email a short description and a link to any project documentation to Cat!

Staff Picks

This edition of Staff Picks includes everything from adaptors and bubble displays to a dehydration alert system for your plants and a dual voltage regulator.

 

MultiAdaptor from Opendous features “multiple overlapping footprints for any occasion: up to 28 pin SOIC/SO (1.27mm pitch), up to 28-pin SSOP/TSSOP (0.65mm pitch), up to four SOT23, up to three SC70, one MSOP-10 (0.5mm pitch), one SOT223, and one SOT-143. All in a 0.8″ wide DIP board. The header pins are staggered to allow press-fitting them while soldering.”

 

Chirp is a plant watering alarm – as simple as that. You put it into the soil near a plant and it emits a tiny chirp when the soil is dry, reminding you to water the plant. Chirp uses capacitive humidity sensing as opposed to resistive humidity sensing, this means, it does not make an electric contact with the soil, avoiding electrode corrosion and soil electrolysis and resulting in better accuracy and longer battery life.”

 

Cameron Tech’s Dual Voltage Regulator comes in handy when you find yourself needing to “supply both 5v to an Arduino (without its own voltage regulator) and 3.3v to attached sensors at the same time.”

4x4x7Segment by sirkha features four HP 4-digit 7-segment bubble displays on a board designed to be mated with the Adafruit HT16K33 breakout, quickly allowing you to display four values using i2c. 

 

 

The Small VAWT Controller by Blueberry controls the current output of a small vertical axis wind turbine. The board features “a micro-controller to sense turbine RPM, input voltage, and input current, and send a PWM signal to a MC34063 buck converter, and if need be a signal to the gate of an SCR to shut down the turbine.”