Hackaday: Chris Gammell Talks Circuit Toolboxes

Chris Gammell wants to know: What’s in your circuit toolbox?

Personally, mine is somewhat understocked. I do know that in one of my journals, probably from back in the 1980s, I scribbled down a schematic of a voltage multiplier I had just built, with the classic diode and capacitor ladder topology. I probably fed it from a small bell transformer, and I might have gotten a hundred volts or so out of it. I was so proud at the time that I wrote it down for posterity with the note, “I made this today!”

I think the whole point of Chris’ 2018 Hackaday Superconference talk is precisely what I was trying to get at when I made my “discovery” — we all have circuits that just work for us, and the more you have, the better. Most readers will recognize Chris from such venues as The Amp Hour, a weekly podcast he hosts with Dave Jones, and his KiCad tutorial videos. Chris has been in electrical engineering for nearly twenty years now, and he’s picked up a collection of go-to circuits that keep showing up in his designs and making life easier, which he graciously shared with the crowd.

As Chris points out, it’s the little circuits that can make the difference. Slide after slide of his talk had schematics with no more than a handful of components in them, covering applications from dead-simple LED power indicators and switch debouncing to IO expansion using a 74HC595. And as any sensible engineer might, Chris’ toolbox includes a good selection of power protection circuits, everything from polarity reversal protection with a MOSFET and a zener to a neat little high-side driver shutoff using a differential amp and an optoisolator.

via Chris Gammell Talks Circuit Toolboxes — Hackaday

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Good Vibrations: two haptic and accelerometer FeatherWings by Pattern Agents

From the Adafruit blog:

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Good Vibrations – two haptic and accelerometer FeatherWings

The Agent-DRV2605-FeatherWing allows you to connect Adafruit Feather CPUs,
and/or Grove System Modules all at the same time, using the Arduino Integrated Development Environment. This gives you maximum flexibility for sensor and actuator, selection and reuse.

  • TI DRV2605L Haptic Driver
  • ADI ADXL345 Accelerometer
  • FeatherWing I2C Compatible Module
  • Grove I2C Compatible Module
  • Integrated Current Measurement Connector
  • ERM Haptic Actuator support
  • LRA Haptic Actuator support
  • 3.3V Operation

The Agent-DA7280-FeatherWing allows you to connect Adafruit Feather CPUs,
and/or Grove System Modules all at the same time, using the Arduino Integrated Development Environment. This gives you maximum flexibility for sensor and actuator, selection and reuse.

  • DialogSemi DA7280L Haptic Driver
  • ADI ADXL345 Accelerometer
  • FeatherWing I2C Compatible Module
  • Grove I2C Compatible Module
  • Integrated Current Measurement Connector
  • ERM Haptic Actuator support
  • LRA Haptic Actuator support
  • 3.3V Operation

See the video below and the Wings are available at the PatternAgents website.

Good Vibrations: two haptic and accelerometer FeatherWings by Pattern Agents

Hackaday: A Tiny IDE For Your ATtiny

From Tom Nardi on Hackaday:

A Tiny IDE For Your ATtiny — Hackaday

When writing code for the ATtiny family of microcontrollers such as a the ATtiny85 or ATtiny10, people usually use one of two methods: they either add support for the chip in the Arduino IDE, or they crack open their text editor of choice and do everything manually. 296 more words

When writing code for the ATtiny family of microcontrollers such as a the ATtiny85 or ATtiny10, people usually use one of two methods: they either add support for the chip in the Arduino IDE, or they crack open their text editor of choice and do everything manually. Plus of course there are the stragglers out there using Eclipse. But [Wayne Holder] thinks there’s a better way.

The project started out as a simple way for [Wayne] to program the ATtiny10 in C under Mac OS, but has since evolved into an open source, cross-platform integrated development environment (IDE) for programming a wide range of ATtiny chips in C, C++, or Assembly. Not only does it integrate the source code editor and programmer, but it even bundles in documentation for common variants of the chips including block diagrams and pinouts; making it a true one-stop-shop for ATtiny hacking.

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To actually get the code onto the chip, the IDE supports using the Arduino as a programmer as well as dedicated hardware like the BusPirate or the USBasp. If you go the Arduino route, [Wayne] has even come up with a little adapter board which he’s made available through OSH Park to help wrangle the diminutive chips.

Order from OSH Park

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IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

From Dan The Geek‘s blog:
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IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

I wanted to create a few projects interfacing an e-paper display with the Adafruit HUZZAH 8266 and HUZZAH 32. The HUZZAH microcontrollers are a great fit with e-paper displays. In addition to having WiFi connectivity to grab date, weather and calendar information from the internet, they also can power themselves down and wake up at a later time. Since the e-paper displays retain their display without power, this makes for a great symbiotic relationship. Running the HUZZAHs with the e-paper display for just a few minutes each day can allow the device to run for weeks or even months depending on the size of the battery.

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In all, I was very happy with the result. I no longer need to hand solder a dozen or so wires on a small proto board and the final product looks very clean. Having the same board compatible with both the HUZZAH 8266 and HUZZAH 32 is an extra bonus. I am putting the finishing touches on the code for a monthly calendar display and name plate/badge that you can see in the photo at the top of this article. This code will be released to GitHub and described in a future article.

IoT Calendar: Creating A Custom Featherwing

Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on February 20th

Join Chris Gammell, Andrew Sowa, Drew Fustini and many more for the next Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on Wednesday, February 20th:

February 3H Chicago Meetup

Wednesday, Feb 20, 2019, 6:30 PM

Ballast Point Brewing Chicago
212 N Green St Chicago, il

9 Members Attending

Please bring your latest project with you! Anything you’re working on, electrical, mechanical or software works! We want to see the stuff that you’re interested in! Helen Leigh, author of “The Crafty Kids Guide to DIY Electronics” [1] will be in town for this event. She and Drew are setting up the first 3H events outside the US (in Germany and Wal…

Check out this Meetup →

Please bring your latest project with you! Anything you’re working on, electrical, mechanical or software works! We want to see the stuff that you’re interested in!

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Hardware Happy Hour (3H) Chicago on February 20th

Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit

Bryan Siepert has published a new Adafruit guide on creating custom circuit boards with EAGLE:

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Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit!

This guide will introduce you to the basic process I use to build PCBs based on Adafruit and other open source designs. We will extract parts of the board files as what Eagle calls “Design Blocks” and then we will use them along with a fundamental workflow in Eagle to create a featherwing-like board for the Trinket M0. This board will allow you to securely attach the Adafruit INA219 current sensor breakout to a Trinket without having to use jumper wires to connect them together. We’re starting with this modest goal to keep things simple as we learn some fundamental concepts, while hopefully also ending up with a useful circuit.

This guide will cover using a Trinket M0 and INA219 breakout, however these same methods can be used to make a PCB to replace the breadboard or protoboard. These techniques can be used to extract useful pieces from open source boards to use in your own completely new circuit boards.

Make your own PCB with Eagle, OSH Park, and Adafruit

Hackaday: Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic Call for Talks

Hackaday is known for having the best community around, and we prove this all the time. Every month, we hold meetups across the United States. This, in addition to conferences and mini-cons across the globe mean Hackaday is the premiere venue for technical talks on a wide variety of hardware creation. Everything from Design for Manufacturing, to the implementation of blinky bling is an open topic.

Now, we’re looking for the talk you can give. The Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic is a monthly gathering hosted by Supplyframe, the Overlords of Hackaday. It’s filled with the technical elite of San Francisco, usually held on the last Thursday of the month. We’re looking for a talk you can give, whether it’s about your IoT irrigation system, or that time you created something out of transistors and capacitors.  We’re looking for speakers for all of 2019, and if you have a tale of the trials and tribulations of injection molding or Bluetooth pairing, we want to hear from you.

We have a sign-up form for presenters, and if you have something to present to a group of fantastic, technical people, we want to hear from you. All these talks are streamed and recorded, so if you’d like an idea of what we’re going for, just check out some of the previous talks. We have talks on how to start a decentralized space agencywearable technology and fashionoptics and FPGAs, and System-in-Package tech. We’ve got a speaker travel stipend of up to $300, so there’s no excuse for you not to present your latest work.

There are thousands of people in the Hackaday community that have tons to contribute, and this is your chance. You are the best of the best, and we want to hear what you have to teach the rest of the community.

via Hardware Developers Didactic Galactic Call for Talks — Hackaday

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