Light-Up Poker Chip

Exciting project by Alex Wulff on Hackster.io:

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Light-Up Poker Chip

This whole circuit is the same size as a regular poker chip, but with an added surprise: lights!

Spice up your poker games with these cool blinking chips. They can be programmed on the fly to have a certain number of the LEDs illuminated to indicate value, or you can have the lights blink in a cool pattern. They make great playing chips for championships or great prizes to hand out to the winners.

Video of the board in action:

AlexWulff has shared the board on OSH Park:

Light Up Poker Chip Rev. 1

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Light-Up Poker Chip

Internet of Fidget Spinners

writes on Hackaday:

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Hackaday Prize Entry: Internet of Fidget Spinners

Last week, everyone on Hackaday.io was busy getting their four project logs and illustrations ready for the last call in this round of the Hackaday Prize. These projects are the best of what the Internet of Things has to offer because this is the Internet of Useful things [..]

This is a PoV fidget spinner, which means the leading edges of this tricorn spinner are bedazzled with APA102 LEDs. Persistence-of-vision toys are as old as Hackaday, and the entire idea of a fidget spinner is to spin, so this at least makes sense.

Find out more on the Hackaday.io project page by Matthias:

 

IoT POV Fidget Spinner

A WiFi fidget spinner, taken from concept to ordering parts in one weekend

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The KiCad design files are available on GitHub:

githubm-byte/fidget-pov

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matthias has shared the board on OSH Park:

IoT POV Fidget Spinner (192a97b)

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Internet of Fidget Spinners

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

Teensy creator Paul Stoffregen has shared a new project on OSH Park:

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

The Monolith Synth Project needed to use a large number of these LED lit arcade buttons.

Dimming of the LEDs was required. Initially I considered using this Adafruit 16 Channel PWM board. But the LEDs in these buttons have integrated resistors which require 12 volts, so 16 transistor circuits and another board for reading the switches would have also been needed.

It uses the same PCA9685 chip for 12 bit PWM control on every LED, with mosfet drivers to handle 12V outputs, and also a MCP23017 chip to read the buttons. Every button has a discrete 1K pullup resistor (rather than using the higher impedance on-chip pullups) to help with use in the same cable bundles cross coupling to 12V PWM signals.

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Monolith Synth

Four of these boards where used in the Monolith Synth project:

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The project is featured in this Tested video:

I/O Expander for LED Arcade Buttons

Trixel Interactive LED Kit

Arkadi designed this interactive LED kit:

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Trixel LED

Create your own interactive Light elements by soldering basic shapes, such as triangle, square, pentagon and hexagon to create an interactive LED sculpture.

Here’s a video of the Trixel LED boards in action:

The design files are available on GitHub:

arkadiraf/Trixel-LED

 

Arkadi_Raf has shared the boards on OSH Park:

Pentagon LED

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Square LED

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Triangle LED

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Order from OSH Park

Trixel Interactive LED Kit

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE

Ted Yapo is designing a display for his  LED Oscilloscope Mk. II and decided to automate the process:

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16×32 Display Design

I painstakingly drew the schematic for 512 LEDs in this display, then endured the drudgery of laying out the board. The whole process took about 45 seconds. Yes, I wrote a few Eagle User Language Programs (ULPs) (elapsed time after the scripts were written and debugged). The previous time I wrote one was last century to lay out a circular LED clock face. I figured it was about time I regained those skills.

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The EAGLE ULPs are on GitHub:

led-matrix-generator

 Eagle scripts for LED matrix display generation

LED Matrix Generator for EAGLE

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle

Bryan Cockfield of Hackaday writes:

Brake Light Blinker Does It with Three Fives

Sometimes you use a Raspberry Pi when you really could have gotten by with an Arudino. Sometimes you use an Arduino when maybe an ATtiny45 would have been better. And sometimes, like [Bill]’s motorcycle tail light project, you use exactly the right tool for the job: a 555 timer.

boardsMore details on William F. Dudley’s project page:

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle

The 555 is a clever chip; not only will it supply the oscillator for the flashing effect, it has a reset pin that can be used to force the output to a known state (low) when (other circuitry tells it that) it’s time to stop flashing. Thus the brake light will be steady “on” after a few flashes every time the brake is applied.

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The 555 is happy to run directly off the nominal 12 volt vehicle electrical system, so no voltage regulator is needed. The 555 is almost immune to electrical system noise, so no worries about your Arduino code going off into the weeds if there’s a spike from the electrical system.

 

Brake Lamp Flasher for Motorcycle

Tilt activated LED watch

askoog89 saw a major flaw with many LED watches – you have to press a button to see the time:

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A Watch

I tried fix that problem by using a tilt switch to active the LED showing the time when tilt your arm to look at the watch

The watch uses the low power MSP430G2211 MCU from Texas instruments to control the LED and mesure the time with the help of a 32kHz watch cristal. The MCU sleeps most of the time only waking up ones a second to count up the time and check if the tilt switch is active.  To show the time the watch uses 12 charlieplexed orange LEDs.

Tilt activated LED watch