OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

 writes on the Tindie blog:

okay2-Medium

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

Take a look at Tindie’s thriving sound section and you’ll see there is no shortage of people making their own electronic music. These devices take many forms, and one interesting take on sound creation is the OKAY 2 Synth DIY Kit. At face value it features 2 octaves of keys, a built-in amplifier along with a 1/4″ line out, and knobs to select the octaves that you’d like to play — but it gets more interesting under the hood.

Oskitone OKAY 2 from oskitone on Vimeo.

What makes it unique by today’s standards is that it doesn’t use any sort of computer or microcontroller, but instead produces sound using an LM555 timer along with other discreet components for monophonic sound. Given its small size, you could use two at once, perhaps combining them via the line out to be further modified in your synth setup!

In case you’re wondering, the original—or nearly so as it’s version 1.1.1—OKAY is also available. It works largely the same as the OKAY 2, but features only a single octave of keys, and doesn’t have an audio output jack.

OKAY 2 Monophonic Synth Kit

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

RAMPS compatible driver module based on DRV8818 by Dean Gouramanis:

Screenshot from 2017-11-15 01-01-04

DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

The goal of this project is to fit the DRV8818 driver circuit onto the standard 0.8″ X 0.6″ PCB size used in RAMPS 3D printers. DRV8825 drivers are a popular choice for desktop 3D printers, because they can provide up to 2.5 amps peak current. The DRV8818 is a similar IC capable of driving up to 3.5 amps, but the circuit is too large to fit on PCB using regular methods. Also, without a propper heatsink it will overheat.

Schematic, gerbers and mechanical CAD files are shared on GitHub:

dgouramanis/T18_driver

 
DRV8818 Stepper Driver Module for 3D Printers

Mr. Runner

Alex Martin is creating a four legged robot with a running bound gait:

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Mr. Runner

The aim of this project is to lower the barrier of entry into dynamic robotics. After seeing Boston Dynamic’s Wildcat I became interested in working on something similar, but was disappointed with what the hobbiest scene had to offer. They all used static locomotion. I wanted it to feel alive!

I hope that if people can see that this style of robotics is reproducible with basic development skills, it will attract a wider range of people to legged robots than just those who want to see a vaguely spider looking device re-implement the same kinematic equations over and over again.

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The approach is based on the work of Fumiya Iida and Rolf Pfiefer at the University of Zurich in the mid 2000’s. Dr. Pfeifer is well known in the field of embodied cognitive science, and these experiments were an attempt to generate movement in quadruped robots based on those principles.

Mr. Runner

3D Printing A Synthesizer


From Brian Benchoff on Hackaday:

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Before there were samplers, romplers, Skrillex, FM synths, and all the other sounds that don’t fit into the trailer for the new Blade Runner movie, electronic music was simple. Voltage controlled oscillators, voltage controlled filters, and CV keyboards ruled the roost. We’ve gone over a lot of voltage controlled synths, but [Tommy] took it to the next level. He designed a small, minimum viable synth based around the VCO in an old 4046 PLL chip

The circuit for this synth is built in two halves. The biggest, and what probably took the most time designing, is the key bed. This is a one-octave keyboard that’s completely 3D printed. We’ve seen something like this before in one of the projects from the SupplyFrame Design Lab residents, though while that keyboard worked it was necessary for [Tim], the creator of that project, to find a company that could make custom key beds for him.

Read more on the F0 on Tommy’s blog:

Hello, F0

Say hello to the F0: a minimalist, analog, square wave synthesizer.

3D Printing A Synthesizer

Robotic Arts: Noodle is Gettin’ Bean Feet

Sarah Petkus posts an update on her Robotic Arts blog about her NoodleFeet robot:

Noodle is Gettin’ Bean Feet!

This summer, I am once again diving into designing mechanical personality quirks. I’ll be investigating new and exciting ways for my robot, NoodleFeet to interact with the world. This time, my focus is the wet, tingly and preferential aspect of TASTE.

moduledrawings

From now until the end of August, my goal is to produce four different tasting modules that each demonstrate some aspect of sampling or preference. You could think of them as the “four tasters of the apocalypse”

If you’re unfamiliar with Sarah and NoodleFeet, then check out here great talk from Hackaday Super Con:

Robotic Arts: Noodle is Gettin’ Bean Feet

3D Printed USB Connector

chmod775 on Hackaday.io designed this simple 3D Printed USB Connector compatible with PCBs from OSH Park:

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3D Printed USB Connector

I’ve made this 3D USB Connector because I want to remove the chunky and complex standard metal USB Connector from my new upcoming project.
The design it’s made to be simple and with the height reference from the OSHP ark PCB’s.

 Screenshot from 2017-04-12 21-44-59
3D Printed USB Connector

Midwest RepRap Fest in 2 weeks

Every year, sometime in March, the world’s preeminent 3D printing enthusiasts gather in the middle of nowhere This is MRRF, the Midwest RepRap Festival. It’s only two weeks away. You need to come. Get your (free) tickets here. I’ll be there, and Hackaday is proud to once again sponsor the festival. I need to backtrack a…

via Two Weeks Until The Greatest 3D Printer Meetup On The Planet — Hackaday

Midwest RepRap Fest in 2 weeks